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drum stick
06-08-2011, 04:54 PM
I've been researching trying to find out which ice chest keeps ice the longest. I've never owned one that would keep ice more than 3 days and then it would mainly be cold water. I've looked at the Engel, the Down Under, and a few more that advertise to keep ice 5 days, but I've never owned any of them because they are so expensive. Which cooler to you think keeps ice the longest?

earnjam
06-08-2011, 05:04 PM
I don't personally have one, but I've heard people rave about the YETI. Seem to be really nice.

http://www.yeticoolers.com

speckhunter80
06-08-2011, 06:17 PM
If ya got the money and you really need to keep ice for five days without restocking it(WHY?), then a YETI is the way to go.

FATBUOY
06-08-2011, 06:18 PM
I've always heard about the YETI, I can't put that kind of coin in a chest. Coleman and others make a 5 day chest, that's optimum conditions, keeping the lid closed type stuff.

papadave
06-08-2011, 07:28 PM
The Coleman Xtream coolers do a very good job. I found a few comparisons on the web and for the $$ the Coleman is the best buy.

I bought a 50qt from Wally World for $35 ..... took it out to Bear Island last October. It got into the high 70s, low 80s every day for 5 days and there was no shade to protect the cooler. Nights were low 50s - high 40s. For ice we used 2 liter bottles of water frozen solid & started with the cooler inside in the AC for a day. Everything we put in had been frozen or refrigerated, all the drinking water was frozen. We carried a smaller cooler for day use - each morning while it was still cool we moved everything we needed for that day(including frozen drinking water) into the small cooler. This way we only opened the Coleman once per day.
At the end of the 5th day we poured all of the water from the 2 liters to reduce weight for carrying. There were still small chunks of ice in the bottles and the remaining drinking water was very cold.

With the big buck coolers you will absolutely get a tougher cooler that will last 3-4 times as long and take a heck of a beating, but if all you need is something that holds the cold for a long time the Coleman 6 day will do the same job or better.
Igloo makes an extended use cooler also, but the reviews aren't nearly as good.

yakattaxx83
06-08-2011, 09:06 PM
I have an Igloo 150 qt cooler that was given to me by a friend its a 7 day ice retention cooler and it will do that if you can keep it out of the sun if not its 4-5 days. I only use it when I camp and I usualy only camp 2-3 days at a time so its perfect for me. I think new their 90$. Brad

sundrop
06-08-2011, 09:54 PM
ditto the top quality versions of igloo and coleman. I also like that you can buy repair parts, hinges etc in most outdoor shops. I occasionally score a cheap/free igloo or coleman at a yardsale and fix it for less than $10-20.

NCPIERMAN
06-08-2011, 10:55 PM
YETI only way to go for extreme weather and long lasting ice IF you can afford one ;)

Bread Man 1
06-08-2011, 11:10 PM
The Xtreme Colemans are great for the money. Keep the plug open so water will drain off, keeps ice longer.

drum stick
06-09-2011, 06:36 AM
Thanks to everyone for the reply. I'm leaning towards the Yeti, mainly because they can be purchased locally. My place on Tucker Creek is a mile back in the woods thru Croatan National forest. If I get up on the third morning I'm there and want to go fishing, I want to go fishing, not drive around all over the place looking for a store open to buy ice.

papadave
06-09-2011, 06:46 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6-TE4RnqT0U

papadave
06-09-2011, 07:00 AM
20486+20488+20489+20487

crappie89
06-09-2011, 07:58 AM
I have the 120 qt coleman green cooler. It was 50 bucks at walmart and so far I have been happy with it.

http://www.walmart.com/ip/Coleman-Xtreme-120-Quart-Cooler/14574678?findingMethod=rr

jlr
06-09-2011, 08:44 AM
Wow, I didn't even know $300+ coolers existed.

I wonder if something like a big thick block of frozen metal (aluminum or copper) would provide more cooling power than block ice? Not sure if the physics would work out - I suppose there's a good chance the phase change from solid ice to liquid water would make the ice more effective...

Other options would be dry ice, or maybe even active cooling - it looks like propane-powered coolers (http://www.propanecooler.com/purchase.html) do exist, but I have no idea of the weight, fuel consumption, etc.



20486+20488+20489+20487

Not as crazy as it might seem at first - they make propane coolers/refrigerators:

http://home.howstuffworks.com/refrigerator5.htm

FishinCary
06-09-2011, 09:25 AM
I know water takes something like 80 calories per ounce at the liquid to solid state. The latent heat of fusion, does it release this same energy when it changes back? If so then there might be something to Jlr's idea.
Search "latent heat" on wikipedia. Basicly when water changes from liquid to solid it releases a certain amount of heat into the air. At least thats what i think based on what it says. Too much info for me to understand but mabye someone who is good with science can say if the change does release energy or not.

jlr
06-09-2011, 09:56 AM
I know water takes something like 80 calories per ounce at the liquid to solid state. The latent heat of fusion, does it release this same energy when it changes back? If so then there might be something to Jlr's idea.
Search "latent heat" on wikipedia. Basicly when water changes from liquid to solid it releases a certain amount of heat into the air. At least thats what i think based on what it says. Too much info for me to understand but mabye someone who is good with science can say if the change does release energy or not.

The change from solid to liquid requires (absorbs) heat energy (and cooling the area in the process), while the reverse process gives off heat energy (like the coils on a refrigerator).

Looks like water has a relatively high latent heat of fusion (334 kJ/kg), much higher than nitrogen at 25.7 (ie liquid nitrogen) and carbon dioxide at 184 (dry ice). The freezing point is much lower for both nitrogen and CO2 though, which must be why they're used. Ammonia has a slightly higher latent heat of fusion than water (338), and also freezes at a much colder temperature (-75C) - this probably explains why it's used as the coolant in the propane-powered refrigerators.

Well, now I'm curious, I think I'm gonna have to go look up the heat capacity of copper, etc, and see if I can compare that with an equivalent amount of ice.

FishinCary
06-09-2011, 10:00 AM
Good stuff jlr, try to figure it out based on IF a chunk of frozen metal would work better, not if it made sense as in weight and effort to get it super cold. Im intrigued as to if it would be better overall for keeping the cooler... Cool

'Bout Time
06-09-2011, 11:05 AM
Here's a tip for you. buy an average priced cooler such as a Igloo marine cooler. Then if you want to keep things cold or even frozen for several days (5 to 7) use dry ice in it along with regular ice. We did this when we went to the SKA nationals last year. Carried Frozen bait and food in my 96 qt. igloo cooler packed in dry ice and regular ice. When we got back home 8 days later things in the cooler were still frozen. The key is NOT opening it too often.
This way is a lot cheaper than buying a super high priced cooler.
As for the dry ice you can get it at bigger Wal-Marts and Ice houses. I know the Wal-Mart in Wilson carries it and am told the ice house in Beaufort NC carries dry ice.

jlr
06-09-2011, 11:11 AM
[Disclaimer: I'm not an engineer and haven't taken physics since college, so this could all be completely wrong. :D]

So, with some quick research, it looks like we need to compare the latent heat of fusion of water (334 kJ/kg) to the heat capacity of solid copper (3.45J/cm3/K). We can do this by volume or by weight, but I think volume is probably more intuitive, so I'll try that.

1kg of liquid water at 0*C is close to 1000 cm3, but solid water ice at 0* is less dense, so 1kg of ice = 915 cm3, so the latent heat of 1000 cm3 of solid water ice at 0*C = 354 kilojoules.

For copper, we need to include the temperature change in our calculations (in degrees Kelvin). First we'll start with a 0*F block of copper, and in order to compare with the phase change of water, we'll calculate how much energy it will take to heat it to 32*F. Copper holds 3.45J per cm3 per *Kelvin, so given our 1000 cm3 block and a temperature change of 18*K, we have a cooling power of 62.1 kilojoules. Looks like the melting ice has about 5 times the cooling power of our chilled block of copper, for the same volume. Impressive.

To have an equivalent cooling power in our copper block, we'd have to chill it to about -152* Fahrenheit. Brrrr.

FishinCary
06-09-2011, 11:13 AM
Very nice job on those numbers jlr. Who knew! I suppose ice is the best way to go. Can you figure out something simular for dry ice's cooling power.

jlr
06-09-2011, 11:38 AM
Very nice job on those numbers jlr. Who knew! I suppose ice is the best way to go. Can you figure out something simular for dry ice's cooling power.

CO2 is interesting, since it goes directly from solid to gas, skipping the liquid phase. We have to use the "enthalpy of sublimation" for CO2 (571 kJ/kg), and it looks like 1000 cm3 of dry ice (weighing about 1530 grams) would absorb 873 kilojoules, almost 3 times as effective as water ice.

speckhunter80
06-09-2011, 11:44 AM
Wow, I didn't even know $300+ coolers existed.

I wonder if something like a big thick block of frozen metal (aluminum or copper) would provide more cooling power than block ice? Not sure if the physics would work out - I suppose there's a good chance the phase change from solid ice to liquid water would make the ice more effective...

Other options would be dry ice, or maybe even active cooling - it looks like propane-powered coolers (http://www.propanecooler.com/purchase.html) do exist, but I have no idea of the weight, fuel consumption, etc.




Not as crazy as it might seem at first - they make propane coolers/refrigerators:

http://home.howstuffworks.com/refrigerator5.htm

For $300 you will only be able to get a 45qt. YETI. A 120qt will go for $470

speckhunter80
06-09-2011, 11:45 AM
BTW, jlr you got way to much time on your hands. Maybe you should use all this extra time and go fish :)

jlr
06-09-2011, 11:50 AM
BTW, jlr you got way to much time on your hands. Maybe you should use all this extra time and go fish :)

That's probably a much better way to spend my lunch break, though I am glad I ran the numbers - it's interesting to see the relationship between water ice, dry ice, and just a cold block of metal.

Flat Doggy
06-09-2011, 12:14 PM
So a Thermos keeps, hot things hot, and, cold things cold! But how does it know? ;0)

ecufisherman
06-09-2011, 01:47 PM
that IRP cooler in the clip looks pretty cool!