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Thread: A Tip To Make You Fish With More Efficiency

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  1. #1
    appangler is offline
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    Default A Tip To Make You Fish With More Efficiency

    Here is a post i wrote in my blog and would like to hear some discussion on this topic. No link to the blog as i don't want this to appear as spaming.

    How many times have you heard when discussing fishing: “the more you cast the more fish you catch.” It’s a fact if you can locate the fish, figure out their pattern, and get your lure in the water you will catch more fish. More casts also equal more chances to figure out that perfect pattern and to find where fish are holding. So why am I writing this? I want to share a way to get more casts and increase your efficiency on the water.

    Now before I share this tip, I would like to ask you to keep an open mind as this will sound backward to a lot of you. Here is the tip: switch to left handed baitcasters. I know those reading this think I am crazy but here is the trick: you don’t have to switch hands.
    Look at it this way, if you had never used a baitcaster before you would probably look at someone like they were crazy if they told you to “cast, put your thumb on the spool, switch hands, and work your lure.” If you look at this objectively you will agree that it makes absolutely no sense to switch hands after you cast.

    Like many anglers my age, I learned to fish with a spinning reel where one does not switch hands when one casts. When I made the switch to a baitcaster it never made since to me. It messed my hook set up, I couldn’t work a lure right, and reeling was an awkward motion for me. One day while out on my father-in-law’s bass boat he noticed that most of my backlashes happened on the hand switch, and we began to think about trying out a left-handed version. The next time we went fishing he had one waiting on me to try. Seemingly all my problems were solved and he showed me after the trip a side note in Bassmaster magazine that said a tournament angler get 10-25% more casts in a day if he utilizes spinning gear to baitcasting because of the lack of hand switch. Imagine the amount of fish you could have possibly landed last year if you had 10-25% more casts!

    Now that I have given you the pros, here are the cons. There is less of a selection of reels than there are for the conventional right handed reels. You won’t be able to go to Wal-Mart or a major retailer to buy a reel as they generally do not carry them. Also, brand new reels generally delay quite awhile in introducing a left-handed version. However, there are many great reels out there in left handed versions and with online shopping today you can research and purchase a reel without leaving your home. The only other con is that you may get fatigued quicker. I friend that I got to switch to left handed baitcaster said that because he would normally switch from casting to spinning equipment all day, thus changing which hand reeled and which arm worked the rod, he got fatigued quicker by not changing which hand reeled and which arm worked the rod. With some practice though, your endurance we be built and you will not notice anymore.

    If you are looking to become a more efficient angler and you are not dead set in your ways, give this a shot. You will get more cast per trip, which may include you landing that trophy fish you have always dreamed of. Until next time

    Stay Safe, Be Awesome,
    AA


  2. #2
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    Default

    Long ago I switched to left handed baitcasters. I didn't think about getting more casts but that part makes sense two. I did it cause I use so much spinning gear it just was natural for me. Often I would get strike while switching hands and lose the fish - no more. My trolling gear uses conventional reels with right hand retrieve though.

    I have been toying with the idea of getting a conventional reel (with right hand retrieve) for jigging. I currently use a spoinning reel but my arm (not my hand) gets tired after a while when jigging big fish in deep water (200' +). It would be nice to switch off once in a while.
    NCPIERMAN, and oldlake like this.

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    Switched to left handed 30 years ago. As Topsail Angler says above, I also missed a lot of fish getting the strike while switching hands. Funny thing is I now look like a klutz when I pick up a right handed reel!

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    Huh, i didnt realize that people switched hands. Some of the best bites are on the fall of the bait. I grew up fishing baitcasters and use a right handed reel and dont switch hands. Just seems unnatural to have to switch hands. However I am awful with a spinning rod.

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    I use bait casters with crank on the right side and never switch hands . I'm left handed . Casting , spinning , and fly ; rod in left hand ,crank with right .

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    Quote Originally Posted by outsider View Post
    I use bait casters with crank on the right side and never switch hands . I'm left handed . Casting , spinning , and fly ; rod in left hand ,crank with right .
    Amen! It's sooooo obvious that all fisherman should be left handed

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    I spincasted as a kid, what little I fished, and baitcasted before I used a spinning rod, so I got use to reeling right handed and prefer it, but I throw right handed and prefer casting right handed. I move my handles on spinning reels to the right side. I will occasionally cast left handed, as I am not terrible at it, but usually, I just switch hands just as the bait hits the water, and don't think I really lose any time in so doing. Maybe I am wrong, though.
    bwguffey, Lucky Doug, and Stew-Rat like this.


  8. #8
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    I too switched to left-handed baitcasters for the same reasons posted here. So glad I did, never looked back. Biggest drawback is you can't buy a reel just anywhere like you can with right-handed.
    For what profit is it to a man if he gains the whole world, and loses his own soul? (Matthew 16:26)

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    I haven't tried left-handed baitcasters yet as this idea is new to me. I'm not sold on the concept of left-handers making fishing more "efficient". If fishing was one continious motion then yes eliminating the switch would deffinatly make it more efficient. But since it is not, as we pause, pulse, jig, jerk etc. baits through the water, I think I benefit from the switch. The 1-2 second switch time allows the bait to settle or start sinking when it hits the water. This 1-2 second pause could be just enough time for any fish around to notice what I'm throwing before it's yanked away.

  10. #10

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    I cast right handed and reel right handed. I switch all my spinners and rarely use a baitcaster. Don't think I'm missing out since on a long cast I've already got the rod in my left hand and waiting on the lure to touch down and flip the bail with my right hand.On a short open bail pitch I will flip the bail with my left hand. I think if you are missing those fish that hit as soon s it lands you're just not closing the bail fast enough. There is no way I could train myself to reel left handed. If i got 75% morr casts I'd still be horribly uncoordinated.Not sure how I got to be that way. Most of my childhood days were with a zebco- aren't they right hand reel? It's been a while since I noticed but if I remember correctly KVD switches like me -spinner and baitcaster right hand reel.
    Lucky Doug likes this.

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  11. #11
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    So you guys that switch hands can keep a buzzbait on top of the water without it ever going under after casting?

    I think people tend to get stuck in their ways and used to doing it a certain way. My dad fished switching hands for as long as i can remember (30 years) and has started buying left hand reel and relearning over the last 5 years and has adjusted fine. I guess im a bit ambidextrous, i cast a spinning reel with my right hand(reel LH) and a bait caster with my left(reel RH), so I am fairly comfortable doing it either way. There is no argument that can support switching hands other than "i cant/dont want to relearn"

    It does amaze me the lack of left hand reels in a right hand dominant society, it is almost similar to golf, where you almost have to learn to do it right handed.

  12. #12
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    [QUOTE=damarshall7;330575]So you guys that switch hands can keep a buzzbait on top of the water without it ever going under after casting?

    Yes.
    bwguffey, Mack in N.C., and OptiMystic like this.


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    Quote Originally Posted by damarshall7 View Post
    So you guys that switch hands can keep a buzzbait on top of the water without it ever going under after casting?
    YES, it a matter of getting the reel in gear and the rod tip up to keep the bait up. I've been using baitcasters for a very long time and don't even think about it. I cast switch hands and never miss a beat.. Its what I'm use to and I don't even think about it, its a habitual thing. The more you practice the better you get.. Maybe in a few more years when I start drawing SS I'll try it..

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  14. #14

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    The down side to not switching hands, is the wrist gets sore after a long day of cast and retrieve. If your elbow gets sore, you are not doing it right. And damarshall is amphibious. He went to State and can fish with either hand.

  15. #15

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    I'm certainly not arguing just saying what I do a that I don't lose any time or miss fish. I will agree with the percentages used though in the post. Even if your average cast was 10 seconds and this will give you at least 10% more casts the the switch is taking a full second- and after the lure hits. That's too slow so you ought to do something about it.if done while the lure is traveling then you haven't lost anything. Still think the closing of the bail or engaging the reel is a big key here. Alot of times I pop the bail just before it hits the water to help keep from reeling the "bow" out of the line. I just don't think I would ever be able to reel as fast with my non dominant hand and not gonna try.
    If a lack of baitcasters with left hand retrieve is frustrating someone who wants to employ this technique you could just " learn" to cast with your left arm instead and your problem would be solved.
    Mack in N.C. likes this.

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