Freshwater Fishingen the Swedish alps
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Thread: Fishingen the Swedish alps

  1. #1
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    Default Fishing in the Swedish alps

    Went to the mountains with my brother and his girlfriend. Target species is arctic charr, had a though first day with 1 degree temp and 12m/s winds but that wont stop us. Today the weather cleared up, still cold but the sky was blue and you could see the mountain peaks!
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  3. #2
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    Dec 2015
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    The boot pic makes my feet hurt. Congrats on the catches.


    Sent from wherever I was at the time...
    Daze823 likes this.


  4. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by 74adamsmith View Post
    The boot pic makes my feet hurt. Congrats on the catches.


    Sent from wherever I was at the time...
    Yea, but picture 5 makes my mouth water. Pretty fish.
    Daze823 likes this.

    2015 Pathfinder 2200 TE, Yamaha VF200 SHO; 2015 Beavertail Vengeance, Suzuki DF90;
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  6. #4
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    Very cool! NCAngler going international.
    Daze823 likes this.

    "What we do in life, echoes in eternity." - Gladiator

  7. #5
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    Wow, did you set that up through a tour, what a great adventure.. The pic of the fish made me hungry
    Red X Angler... I am but a padawan.
    Old Town Predator 13

  8. #6
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    We have a caravan that can manage 4 people at a camping spot there year round.In the winter we pull the snowmobiles up there. The fishing in the area is fantastic year round no guides needed, plenty of spots that produce fish. One of my favorite fish to eat, best smoked in a pasta sauce!


  9. #7
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    Knoxville
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    Arctic Char are very tasty. There's a fish market here, the Shrimp Dock, that has them regularly. They get 'em from all over, Alaska, Canada, Iceland, and Scotland. What other fish are there? ....Salmon, Browns, Pike-Perch...?

  10. #8
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    Nice char!

  11. #9
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    Dec 2017
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    We got a wide variaty of freshwater species some native some "imported", northern pike growing up to 45 pounds, European perch (perca fluvitalis) reaching 5-6 pounds, Big Arctic charr, big browns and seabound browns, salmon, grayling, bourbout, zander the list goes on but those are the most targeted species. A lot of rainbowtrout in stocked streams and lakes.
    Most fishing i do is pike and perch aswell as browns,seatrout and grayling a few trips for charr.

    For sure one of my favorite fish !

  12. #10
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    I had to look up Zander. I found out it was the same thing as a Pike-Perch. It's fun seeing the fresh water fish of Europe. So many of them have similar cousins in North America. I have a poster of European Fish in one of my bathrooms. Did you know that the mountains of Norway, Sweden, and Scotland are all part of the Appalachians? Those pieces of land were on the other side of the Atlantic Ocean when the piece of land that became northern Africa hit the piece of land that was becoming North America. This raised mountains all the way from whats present day eastern Oklahoma all the way up to Canada and the pieces of land that drifted to Europe. This was 250 million years ago. I think that this contributed to so many similar or same species on different sides of the present Atlantic Ocean.Click image for larger version.

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  13. #11
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    It's pretty fantastic, i think a lot of the fish that originally came from Europe were brought over by settelers. Trout for example the brits brought along to a variaty of places around the globe. At the same time there is a bigger variaty of species at least when it coems to game fish in your waters.

  14. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vicko View Post
    It's pretty fantastic, i think a lot of the fish that originally came from Europe were brought over by settelers. Trout for example the brits brought along to a variaty of places around the globe. At the same time there is a bigger variaty of species at least when it coems to game fish in your waters.
    The two European fish that have had significant impacts in North America are Carp and Brown Trout. Carp are a bit of a minor nuisance. Brown Trout are a monumental success. They're such a perfect trout for the southern Appalachians. They're so adaptable and hard to fish out. I believe that the ice ages made Browns so very adaptable. The ice would invade and push them way downstream to warmer water and then the ice would recede and they'd work their way back to cooler headwaters.

    The southern Appalachians is the most bio-diverse part of North America. The ice ages pushed so many species south and many remain to this day. That goes for plants, animals, and fish.

  15. #13
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    It certainly is amazing, my girlfriend moved to Raleigh 3 weeks ago to do her PHd in biology/Ecology. We are both very fascinated as well as intrigued by nature. Will be visiting Raleigh late February early march, will be going both up in the mountains and down to the sea want to experience as much of NC as possible in my first visit!


    Trout in general seems to be very adaptable, just here in Sweden there are a huge variety of Brown trout. We have the "regular" stationary brown trout in various shapes and sizes (phenotypes) as well as the sea bound browns. They all belong to the same species of Brown trout (salmo trutta) but their habitats vary greatly from saltwater to brackish and then to lakes and rivers all the way up to the mountains. Being able to handle the varying temperature as you said probably is because of the moving inland ices, I don't actually know. But it's truly fascinating.

  16. #14
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    Try some Smallmouth Bass fishing. They're very fun to catch. They jump a lot and have great strength and endurance. Try some of the reservoirs that have Rainbows, Santeetlah, Apalachia, and Calderwood would be on that list. You'll catch some Browns in those lakes too. There's more Browns than Rainbows in Apalachia. Santeetlah has a good Walleye population. I caught one just shy of 3 Kg there last summer. Don't be afraid to cross the border into Tennessee, where I live, there's some terrific trout lakes. Watauga is great for Lakers, Rainbows, and a few Browns. Plus, there's Smallmouths and Walleyes. Two years ago I got a Laker there that was close to 4 kg. The lake and state record is over 10 Kg. I hope to catch one that's 5, or more, kilos this coming season. Chilhowee Lake, also in Tennessee, is a terrific Rainbow Lake. There's lots of 1-3 Kg Rainbows and some bigger ones if you can land them. There's Smallmouths, Walleyes, and Yellow Perch too. I netted a Smallmouth there for a friend that went around 4 Kg about 20 years ago. It took him 30 minutes to get it to the boat on 4 pound test mono. The drag worked overtime! ...and well! The series of lakes on the Little Tennessee River all offer good fishing.

    Imagine how the fiords of Norway and Iceland looked during the height of an ice age. The sea level is so far down that they're river canyons. England is connected to Europe. What Baltic Sea....! ....more like the Baltic Basin.... The deltas for European rivers are out in what's open sea now. Iceland and Greenland were way bigger.

  17. #15
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    Im really looking forward to doing some bassfishing. Watched a lot on youtube as it's so common in the US it's featured on a lot of
    channels. Il be bring takle for a little of everything, allthough it's not really a fishing trip (a)
    Lakers are also something i have really wanted to do, we have few bodies of water in Sweden were you can catch them. Last year the Swedish record was broken and the new one is around 9.8 kilos if a remember correctly. But their caught in lakes or reservoirs where they breed fish commercially, so it's not very natureal acording to me at least.
    Sounds like you have some wonderfull fishing aswell. There is nothing better then the sound of a drag working as hard as it can.
    I would have loved to visit tennesee but will be spending about 6 days aroudn asheville and then head for the coast.
    Any suggestions in those areas ? How is fishing in early march, can you fish the rivers and lakes or do i need my ice fishing gear ?

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