Public Comment Requested on CSMA Striped Bass Management
Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Public Comment Requested on CSMA Striped Bass Management

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    36

    Default Public Comment Requested on CSMA Striped Bass Management

    http://survey.constantcontact.com/su...wfjo/questions

    http://portal.ncdenr.org/web/mf/nr-0...ed-bass-correx

    Release: Immediate
    Contact: Patricia Smith
    Date: Jan. 10, 2019
    Phone: 252-342-0642
    CORRECTION: Corrects link in 7th graph

    Fisheries seeks comments on proposed no-possession
    limit for striped bass in some internal coastal waters


    MOREHEAD CITY — The N.C. Division of Marine Fisheries is accepting public comment on a draft temporary restriction for a no-possession limit for striped bass in some waters of the state.

    The proposed management measure would apply to commercial and recreational fishing in the Tar, Pamlico, Pungo, Bay and Neuse rivers and other joint and coastal waters of the Central Southern Management Area.

    A no-possession requirement already exists for the Cape Fear River and its tributaries. The proposal would not impact striped bass fishing in the Atlantic Ocean, Albemarle Sound Management Area, Roanoke River Management Area, or in inland fishing waters under the jurisdiction of the N.C. Wildlife Resource Commission.

    The public may comment on the proposed management measure at a public meeting to be held:
    Jan. 16 at 6 p.m.
    N.C. Department of Environmental Quality’s Washington Regional Office
    943 Washington Square Mall, Washington
    Each speaker may comment for up to three minutes. More time may be allotted, depending on the number who sign up to speak. No other topic will be discussed at this meeting.

    The public may also comment on the proposal in writing online here or by mail to:
    Comments
    Central Southern Striped Bass Supplement
    N.C. Division of Marine Fisheries
    P.O. Box 769
    Morehead City, N.C. 28557
    Public comment will not be accepted by email or over the telephone.

    Written comments will be accepted until 5 p.m. Jan. 23.

    The Division of Marine Fisheries is developing the new restriction through Supplement A to Amendment 1 to the N. C. Estuarine Striped Bass Fishery Management Plan. The division received approval to go forward with the supplement from the Marine Fisheries Commission at its November meeting and from Department of Environmental Quality Secretary Michael Regan in a Dec. 19 letter.

    The division recommended the proposed temporary restriction to protect possible naturally-spawned year classes of striped bass until Amendment 2 to the N. C. Estuarine Striped Bass Fishery Management Plan is adopted. Amendment 2 could continue the no-possession provision or recommend other management actions.

    Research has shown that striped bass in Central Southern Management Area are not a self-sustaining population and that fishermen are mainly catching hatchery-raised fish; however, data suggests there have now been two naturally-spawned year classes. The proposed temporary management measure would offer additional protection for those non-hatchery fish.

    The proposed supplement will be brought before the Marine Fisheries Commission for adoption at its Feb. 20-22 business meeting. If approved, the management measure would be implemented by proclamation no later than March 1.

    Draft Supplement A to Amendment 1 to the N. C. Estuarine Striped Bass Fishery Management Plan and other related documents may be found on the division’s website here.

    nr-06-2019

  2. Remove Advertisements

    Advertisements
     

  3. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    1,949

    Default

    Comment posted. What good does this do if gill nets stay in the water? Would there not be mortality from bycatch?
    "What we do in life, echoes in eternity." - Gladiator

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    36

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by crappie89 View Post
    Comment posted. What good does this do if gill nets stay in the water? Would there not be mortality from bycatch?
    A friend emailed me this yesterday-


    We have heard concern from some that recreational anglers will give the impression we are "greedy" by advocating for limitedharvest under WRC rules. But these fish are stocked fish, fish stocked byUSFWS for the following reasons:National Fish Hatchery System

    For over 140 years, the National Fish Hatchery System (NFHS) hasworked collaboratively with tribes, states, landowners, partners andstakeholders to promote and maintain healthy, self-sustainingpopulations of fish and other aquatic species. The NFHS consists of(72) National Fish Hatcheries, one historic National Fish Hatchery, nine FishHealth Centers, seven Fish Technology Centers, and the Aquatic Animal DrugApproval Partnership Program. The unparalleled conservation efforts of thissystem not only enhance fishes and their habitats, but also angling opportunitiesfor our Nation’s 58 million recreational anglers and associated economies.National Fish Hatchery System propagation addresses toppriorities such as enhancement of recreational fishing andpublic use of aquatic resources, recovery of federally-listed threatened orendangered species, restoration of imperiled species, andfulfillment of tribal partnerships and trust responsibilities. Hatcheries workclosely with Federal agency partners, like the US Army Corps of Engineers, tomitigate impacts of Federal water projects via reimbursable service agreements.In order to maintain excellence in aquatic conservation to ensure healthyfisheries, Fish and Wildlife Service professionals closely monitor the health,status, and trends of aquatic populations; measure the quantity and quality ofimportant aquatic habitat to support strong fisheries; and limit the outbreakand spread of invasive species and disease-causing pathogens. In Fiscal Year2016, (68) NFHS facilities and (2) Fish and Wildlife Conservation Officesdistributed (released and transferred) 238,111,345 juveniles, adults, and eggsof (5) different taxonomic groups, encompassing (83) different species into(47) states.--------------------There is no mention of commercial fishing. Infact, allowing commercial fishing at all is counterproductive to theaforementioned goals.----------Bycatch of striped bass in the gill net fishery has been shownthrough peer reviewed, published literature1 to be the major factor in themortality of striped bass in the Neuse river. The statistics presented arestrong1 (see abstract below). In biological systems, thosenumber are considered a robust number regarding "cryptic mortality. Incontrast, we have seen no statistical information presented by the DMF. In fact, after asking if DMF did any statistical power calculations todetermine how robust their data was, they refused to answer. Moreover,they refused to answer any of the questions we posed as to their methods andadditional data requests. I have heard from many anglers who could stomach a moratorium (and lesstackle dealers that could) IF the nets were removed. I am one of them. Without the nets being removed, why should wehave to go to a moratorium on OUR fish. Yes,these are fish stocked for recreational fishing, not to be wasted as deaddiscards in the gill net fisheries. Tocompound things, the condition of the Southern flounder is so bad, in largepart to overfishing by gill nets, it makes perfect, indeed common sense toremove the gill nets from the affected very limited areas. It’s a “two-fer”. We are going to have to cut Southern flounderfishing by at least 50%, why not bet the best bang for the buck (limitedclosure)?


    1 Exploring Causal Factors of Spawning StockMortality in a Riverine

    Striped BassPopulationKyle T. Rachels* and Benjamin R.RicksNorth CarolinaWildlife Resources Commission, 1721 Mail Service Center, Raleigh, NorthCarolina 27699-1700, USAAbstractThe recovery of theAtlantic Striped Bass Morone saxatilis stock in the 1990s is an importantexample of effectivenatural resourcesmanagement. Implementation of Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission(ASMFC) harvestregulations reducedmortality, protected older and more fecund females, and contributed to theformation of dominantyear-classes in the1980s and 1990s. However, Striped Bass stocks south of Albemarle Sound, NorthCarolina, arenot subject toASMFC management plans, and many populations have failed to attain recoverygoals. Catch-curveanalyses indicatethat the Neuse River Striped Bass population continues to experience spawningstock exploitationrates similar tothose implicated in the decline of the Atlantic Migratory and AlbemarleSound/Roanoke River stocksin the 1970s. From1994 to 2015, Striped Bass instantaneous fishing mortality (F) in the NeuseRiver ranged from0.12 to 0.84 andexceeded the overfishing threshold (FThreshold = 0.41) in 12 of 22 years. A globallinear model usingenvironmental andexploitation factors accounted for 55% of the variability in spawning stockdiscrete annual mortality.Aninformation-theoretic approach was used to elucidate the best linear model forpredicting discrete annualmortality. The bestmodel included previous-year gill-net effort and same-year commercial harvest(Akaike weight =0.64, R2 = 0.50).Model-averaged coefficients for gill-net effort and commercial harvestsuggested total exploitationimpacts that werecongruent with other studies of Neuse River Striped Bass. Results indicate that reducing exploitationto target levels will require substantial reductionsin gill-net effort in areas of the Neuse River where Striped Bassoccur. Reducing exploitation may increasespawning stock biomass and advance the age structure of spawningfemales, conferringan increased likelihood of successful r

  5. Remove Advertisements

    Advertisements
     

  6. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    1,949

    Default

    Is that from someone in the NC-WRC?
    "What we do in life, echoes in eternity." - Gladiator

  7. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    36

    Default

    Ben Ricks and Kyle Rachels are two WRC wildlife biologists assigned to the Neuse and Tar Rivers to manage many things including the WRCs interest in striped bass. Both have written several recent research papers documenting the fishery and identifying bottlenecks to recruitment. That research shows that non-directed gillnet mortality in the rivers and sound is the single largest source of total mortality, exceeding the combined directed mortality of the commercial and recreational sectors.

    Removing nets in the rivers is needed, but is a political hot potato that the WRC probably isn't willing to fight for with an entrenched staff at DMF. DMF has gone as far as to produce highly questionable data trying to prove that gillnet discard mortality is extremely low. It truly is an embarrassment to DEQ and Secretary Regan.

    What is absolutely maddening to me, and should be to everyone, is that with the state of American Shad, Southern Flounder and CSMA striped bass, there is really no reason to have an anchored large mesh gill net fishery. With a 50% to 70% flounder catch reduction looming, or a possible moratorium, gillnet harvest and discards should be the first cut. NC is spending a $million plus to manage the Turtle and Sturgeon ITPs for the gillnet fisheries, a complete waste of money. DMF is protecting staff jobs. A big problem is DMF leadership does not have the guts to make sound biological recommendations because of politics- self preservation while watching our fisheries collapse.


  8. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    108

    Default

    Is there a summary report available for the 1/16 meeting?

  9. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    12

    Default

    JS Smith posted; "That research shows that non-directed gillnet mortality in the rivers and sound is the single largest source of total mortality,"" I can perhaps go along with the statement that gill net discard is a problem in the rivers and sound but to make the claim that its the main culprit is a bit of a stretch. Whens the last time anyone in the NC WR conducted gut analysis of the large flocks of fish eating birds in that area in order to determine that impact as an example. any studies on the long term survival of released stripers either in nets or hook and line gear. Just because a netter or a rec fisherman releases a fish does not make it a sure thing that the fish will live a long and happy life. Far too many wannabe researchers now days are far to quick to come up with conclusions before looking at all of the data

  10. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    36

    Default

    A big thanks to all who gave public comment and it's not too late to still give it. You can write the MFC or call them ahead of next week's meeting in Williamston, or personally attend on Wednesday night at 6pm to give public comment.

    Link to next week's meeting- http://portal.ncdenr.org/web/mf/nr-15-2019-mfc-meeting

    You can find the current public comment on CSMA Striped Bass in next week's MFC Briefing Book starting on page 353- http://portal.ncdenr.org/c/document_...LFE-140040.pdf

    Out of 149 online responses to the online survey, 118 mentioned entirely banning gillnets in some form.

    Below is an example of one of the comments that came from a member of this site-

    SEEMS LIKE YOU WANT TO STOP RECREATIONAL FISHING IN NORTH CAROLINA IN THIS AREA . COST ME 100.00 DOLLARS EACH TRIP FOR GAS , FOOD ETC. AND CAN ONLY KEEP A FEW FISH AND NOW YOU WANT A NO- POSSESSION ON STRIPED BASS !!! FISHING FOR ROCK , DRUM , SPECKLED TROUT AND FLOUNDER IN NORTH CAROLINA IS GOING THE WAY OF HERRING AND GREY TROUT , SO SAD !! IF YOU REALLY WANT TO DO SOMETHING USEFUL , GET THE NETS OUT OF COASTAL CREEKS AND MAKE TROUT A GAME FISH . THANK YOU

    The final recommendation from the Division to the MFC is that they implement a complete moratorium until the completion of the Amendment to the FMP, about two years. At that time, new rules may or may not include the moratorium...a complete closure.


  11. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Posts
    108

    Default

    The no possession of striped bass in CSMA passed and is in effect starting March11. The commission met today in Kinston and told the Director that a no gill nets inside (upstream) the ferry lines is also in effect.
    Commercial fishing groups said they will appeal the decision. Read a detailed synopsis of today's meeting at ncwaterman.com

  12. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    36

    Default

    Thanks for everyone's hard work in doing what is right for this important fishery.

    As Feetup1 stated above, the Kinston meeting shut down the rivers to ALL gillnets upstream of the Minnesott/Cherry Branch and Aurora/Bayview ferry lines. This was not only needed for striped bass but a huge win in overall fisheries management.

    I personally do not see the NCFA filing a lawsuit. The science from WRC is crystal clear- regulatory discards and illegal retention in the gillnet fishery is the problem. With the rec sector taking a closure, the NCFA stands little chance in winning a suit.

    The DMF's junk science tried to paint the recreational sector as an equal problem due to the recent spike in projected release mortality. It's important to understand that the only reason recs have the current level of release mortality is because of the two large year classes of naturally spawned fish, which the recs were begging to protect. Prior to those two year classes of natural spawned fished, the commercial sector was responsible for 85% of total mortality. It was a problem then and it will be again if the nets return.

    The great news is that the MFC in Kinston asked the WRC to concur with coastal regulations in joint waters. The WRC went an extra step and concurred with a complete moratorium in not only joint waters but also inland waters. That action closed 100% of the CSMA to all harvest and all gillnets at the river lines.

    We will now have the opportunity to see what happens in two years.

    The sad thing is both the DMF and Sec Regan (DEQ) issued press releases blaming a rogue MFC for taking unnecessary action with the gillnet closure.

    The fact is that both the Division and the Department are scared to death of legislative retribution, budget cuts. The current mentality at the Division and the Department will provide little in the way of substantial fisheries reform measures. Any significant win for the resource is coming out of the legislature. Please be talking with your House and Senate members every chance you get.


    Latest News & Events




    Division of Marine Fisheries, Wildlife Resources Commission extend year-round striped bass season closure to inland, joint waters

    • 26 March 2019
    • Number of views: 79


    MOREHEAD CITY – A year-round recreational striped bass season closure will go into effect at 12:01 a.m. on Friday, March 29, 2019, in all waters of the Central Southern Management Area where a closure does not already exist. The Cape Fear River and its tributaries are already under a harvest moratorium and are not impacted by this change.
    N.C. Division of Marine Fisheries Director Steve Murphey and N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission Executive Director Gordon Myers issued consistent proclamations today that result in a year-round closure in all joint fishing waters of the Central Southern Management Area. Further, in light of protective measures already implemented through proclamations issued by Director Murphey that prohibit striped bass harvest and limit commercial gear, the Wildlife Resources Commission proclamation also closed the striped bass season in all remaining inland waters within the Central Southern Management Area. A year-round season closure is already in effect for all coastal waters of the Central Southern Management Area.
    The Central Southern Management Area encompasses all waters from just south of Oregon Inlet to the South Carolina line. The major waterbodies and their tributaries impacted include, but are not limited to:

    • the Pamlico and Core sounds,
    • the Tar River downstream of Rocky Mount Mills Dam,
    • the Pamlico River,
    • the Pungo River,
    • the Neuse River downstream of Falls Lake Dam,
    • the White Oak River, and
    • the New River.

    The closure does not impact striped bass fishing in the Atlantic Ocean, in the Albemarle Sound Management Area, the Roanoke River Management Area, or the Pee Dee River and tributaries downstream of Blewett Falls Dam.
    A map of the closed areas can be found here.
    The regulatory changes finalize implementation of Supplement A to Amendment 1 to the N. C. Estuarine Striped Bass Fishery Management Plan, which was adopted by the Marine Fisheries Commission in February. The approved supplement contained a no possession measure for striped bass for both commercial and recreational fisheries in coastal and joint waters of the Central Southern Management Area.
    The two agencies are currently working on Amendment 2 to the North Carolina Estuarine Striped Bass Fishery Management Plan, as research has shown that the striped bass populations in the Central Southern Management Area are not self-sustaining. These temporary management measures will ensure the protection of naturally-spawned year classes of striped bass until the amendment is completed.





    Feetup1 likes this.


  13. Remove Advertisements

    Advertisements
     

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •