Articulated streamers with multiple hooks in designated trout water.
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Thread: Articulated streamers with multiple hooks in designated trout water.

  1. #1
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    Default Articulated streamers with multiple hooks in designated trout water.

    Hey look! Itís a fly fishing post.

    Trying to jump head long into the streamer side of things. Got me thinking. All water, other than hatchery supported, is single hook.
    Im ďassumingĒ that game wardens would consider that a big streamer with double hooks would be in violation.
    Although sleuthing around on the subject, I saw in a Washington state forum, that someone said articulated streamers were considered two separate flies, one tied to the other. That was debated by the way.

    Whats the consensus here? Do you clip off one of the hooks? If so, which one? The head or tail?
    sboro likes this.


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  3. #2
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    I asked this very question in late December, and the Enforcement Officer said to call the Enforcement Officer that oversees the area you are fishing. It seems there is interpretation involved even in the field.

    To be clear, I asked for clarification regarding droppers and articulated flys in single hook waters.

  4. #3
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    I've been checked several times on the Davidson, the wildlife officers here have always considered "single hook" to simply mean the use of single pronged rather than treble hooks, which is perfectly in keeping with the spirit of the law.
    Fishscalz, and sboro like this.


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    Not sure I would make that argument for a stinger though.
    -Andy

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dylar View Post
    I've been checked several times on the Davidson, the wildlife officers here have always considered "single hook" to simply mean the use of single pronged rather than treble hooks, which is perfectly in keeping with the spirit of the law.
    Excellent, good to know.

    thanks Dylar

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    Straight from the regulations:" Lures/Bait Restrictions* Artificial lures with a single hook. Natural bait may not be possessed." One lure=one hook.
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    Red X Angler

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    Maybe that's the reason I received the answer I did.


    Spirit of the regulation vs. letter of the regulation.
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  10. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by finstalker View Post
    Straight from the regulations:" Lures/Bait Restrictions* Artificial lures with a single hook. Natural bait may not be possessed." One lure=one hook.
    Nah, if it meant that, it would read artificial lures with one single hook. Read your way, it would permit the use of a single treble hook, which is not in keeping with the clear intent of the law.
    bonz, and sboro like this.


  11. #9
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    Interesting debate for sure.
    Im imaginging the enforcement of which could depend on the mood of the warden that checks you.

    hey, I’m just glad to see people are at least checking in on this forum.

    Ill try and post more drivel and random thoughts to get discussion going when I think of something.

    i think about fishing a lot more than I actually fish.

  12. #10
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    I had a similar inquiry last year but misspoke with my stream terminology with the Davidson and West Fork Pigeon in my original post making it somewhat confusing.

    https://www.ncangler.com/forums/thre...ht=single+hook

    One good suggestion from another angler was to clip a hook at the bend if you would still like to use the fly but it is on single hook designated waters. This is common practice for spin fishers as noted in the post. I have yet to try it but I would think the back hook would be the hook to clip on articulating flies as most strike I have gotten have been the upper hook. This also makes since when looking at other streams which typically have long "tails" behind the hook bend.

    Fishscalz offered some guidance on my post as well. I was curious if there was a minimum or maximum length for the dropper.

    ***Below are my thoughts and not sourced from any regulatory entity:
    I would assume this would follow in line with double nymph rigs but the question is what would distinguish it from an articulating fly tied with a mono connector. There is no minimum or maximum length requirement of line between rigs, I think partially due to the fact that the laws are stated as they are above and doesn't address the double lure vs double hook debate when talking about these types of techniques. I feel this means you could use a dropper rig or double nymph as they are two separate lures both containing one hook on a rig vs the articulating flies which I would view as a single lure containing two inline hooks.

    I would appreciate any more knowledgeable comment on my opinion as I am mostly a salt guy and have just started to dabble in the cold water trout.

    As Dylar states about it being about the clear intent of the law, but I (as a somewhat inexperienced trout fisherman) can clearly see where trebles can poss threat to trout, feel there is less threat with double rigs and possibly tandem (although I see where this is a stretch and would avoid this) but could be wrong and would like correction if so.

  13. #11
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    I cannot say that the benefits of articulated streamers are enough to warrant such tedium. There are meat items of the flyfishing side that are drifted and not stripped, that work perform much better than any streamer would, and have ONE single hook.

    Your best streamer fishing is probably going to take place on large hatchery streams that hold wild, or naturalized stockers, or perhaps undesignated rivers such as the Hiwassee.
    sboro likes this.


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    Quote Originally Posted by mrpossumtail View Post
    I cannot say that the benefits of articulated streamers are enough to warrant such tedium. There are meat items of the flyfishing side that are drifted and not stripped, that work perform much better than any streamer would, and have ONE single hook.
    Under the conditions that favor streamer fishing, I don't find this to be true at all. High stained water conditions put a premium on covering water, which is better done with a stripped fly than a dead drift. Articulated patterns provide more natural movement (even when dead drifted, so there's that), a more visible profile and move more water (an important consideration in stained water or low light conditions). They get more and better hookups from (notoriously short strike prone) trout. The design of many articulated patterns makes them track better and remain in the kill zone longer than smaller, single hook patterns. They more closely approximate the size and action of the larger meals big trout (especially big, predatory browns) favor. These flies definitely have a niche, and it's not one that can easily by filled by others types of patterns.
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  15. #13
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    Watching) a very current video, where the subject came up. (Some,of yíall have maybe already watched) and they are saying you need to cut one of the hooks off. Guessing the interpretation of the law is at the discretion of the officer who checks you.
    @mrpossumtail I get what youíre saying and Iím sure youíre correct in some circumstances. Iíve just been intrigued by a lot of reading/watching Galloups stuff and even some locals( @Dylar not withstanding). Iím going to give it a try.

  16. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dylar View Post
    Nah, if it meant that, it would read artificial lures with one single hook. Read your way, it would permit the use of a single treble hook, which is not in keeping with the clear intent of the law.
    From your earlier answer, "I've been checked several times on the Davidson, the wildlife officers here have always considered "single hook" to simply mean the use of single pronged rather than treble hooks, which is perfectly in keeping with the spirit of the law."

    My question is, why does your 'single hook' mean a single pronged hook but my 'single hook' means a treble?
    Red X Angler

  17. #15
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    Man, wish this was posted last night. I fished the Davidson today and actually saw a warden in the hatchery parking lot. He didn’t check me, but I would have asked him this question had I thought about it.
    btw, I was fishing articulated flies with both hooks. Definitely not the right choice for the day, only got a couple follows by a small fish...but #ionlyfishmeatthough

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