When is warmer water too warm for specks
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Thread: When is warmer water too warm for specks

  1. #1
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    Default When is warmer water too warm for specks

    So I have had pretty good success this past winter finding and catching speckled trout. I really focused on finding warm pockets of water, usually farther back in the creeks and on mud flats, and caught fish steadily December through March. A couple degrees seemed to make all the difference in the world.

    Now things seem to be warming up nicely...surface temps where I fish have moved from the low 50s to the mid-60s. But quite frankly, I seem to have an easier time finding the trout while the water is cooler. I am still catching fish in 2-4 feet of water on those same mud flats I fished in Februarybut am beginning to wonder how long before the fish move out of there to deeper water.

    Somebody please school me on temperature and trout. At what water temperature will they leave the shallower creeks? Where do they go to in the summer, and what structure will I find them on as they move out of the creeks and into the main river? They will be spawning for the next 3-4 months, right? My experience has been that as we get into May-June-July it will be harder for me to find trout as water temps move through the 70s and into the 80s.

    I will probably get pleasantly distracted by the shallow water flounder holding to banks, and they will taste great on my plate, but I really love to catch those specks. How can I make trout-catching a year-round success story? Any and all advice will be appreciated.
    Kayak Angler, Red X Angler, and a Full Time Angler (as of 2/1/18!!!)Retirement!

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  3. #2
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    I have caught them at fort fisher in summer time while I was fishing for flounder.
    Chris52 likes this.


  4. #3
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    Have caught them in July throwing topwaters. ..... ICM
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    Chris52, and steven.brewster like this.


    My wife keeps saying I don't listen to her .... or something like that.

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  6. #4
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    I believe that trout are easier to find during the cooler months because they concentrate in the creeks where they have deeper holes for refuge when the temps really drop. They'll move out of the deeper holes to the flats where the sun warms the water a few degrees and to feed. Then they go back to the holes, but they don't move far when the water is cold. During warmer months when they are spawning, there is a much greater abundance of food so they spread out more widely in the system. At least in my home waters I usually catch the biggest trout of the year from June through August fishing shallow flats early in the day with very warm water on topwaters and jerkbaits like ICM mentioned. Numbers aren't as good as in the Fall, but quality is usually better.


  7. #5
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    Yep, I think it is the scattering part that has me stumped...when I can I am trying to use current (like at creek mouths going in or out) to my advantage, or structure like points or windy banks. It just has not been consistent for me.

    Topwaters, yes I have done OK with them, especially at first light. And it is an exciting way to catch. That bite seems to go away fast, though, and then I am left to searching. At that point I usually go back to Gulp baits under a popping cork.

    All winter I mainly used MR 17s slow slow slow casting, and trolling M 52’s under a cork. Again, I am yak fishing, so have been able to get back into some really skinny places. For summer, I have always thought that I needed to look for at least 5 feet of water if jig fishing.
    Feetup1 likes this.

    Kayak Angler, Red X Angler, and a Full Time Angler (as of 2/1/18!!!)Retirement!

  8. #6
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    As spring progresses they will start to move out of the creeks. If you stop catching them in your winter spots start moving toward the mouth. Also this time of year they will start to show themselves more. You will see swirls sometimes and nervous bait. In the summer they will mostly be out of the creeks completely. Thats why places like swan quarter and out toward the sound are more popular in the summer. If your still catching them where you were keep dong it. When you stop catching start working your way toward the mouth of creeks and so on. They will still be in relatively shallow water a lot of times when feeding in the spring. As the temps progress you might find them on the drop off instead of the bank. The "drop off" could be about 10-15 feet from the bank where it goes from 3'-5' or a little deeper.
    Chris52, ecunupe, and Mr. Wizard like this.


  9. #7
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    For me summer Trout are mostly accidental catches, because I'm targeting Reds with topwaters..... ICM
    Chris52 likes this.


    My wife keeps saying I don't listen to her .... or something like that.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ice cream man View Post
    For me summer Trout are mostly accidental catches, because I'm targeting Reds with topwaters..... ICM
    Id say summer trout fishing is the worst of all seasons. They are typically more scattered and harder to find. I really dont put as much effort in for trout that time of year.

  11. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mumbo_Pungo View Post
    Id say summer trout fishing is the worst of all seasons. They are typically more scattered and harder to find. I really dont put as much effort in for trout that time of year.
    and there is my frustration!!!
    Kayak Angler, Red X Angler, and a Full Time Angler (as of 2/1/18!!!)Retirement!

  12. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris52 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Mumbo_Pungo View Post
    Id say summer trout fishing is the worst of all seasons. They are typically more scattered and harder to find. I really dont put as much effort in for trout that time of year.
    and there is my frustration!!!
    Some times of year are better than others. It's how it is with every species of fish.

  13. #11
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    Was able to go again today...they are still in the same places I have been finding them for the past 4 months, so I won't look a gift horse in the mouth. No pictures, but in two hours caught a dozen 16-18 inch fish on chartreuse Gulp 4 inch swimming mullet baits trolling with my Windsor Bobber Planers. Toward the mouth I caught an 8 pound striper that about ripped my rod holder off the track. Windy all day, though! Appreciate all the advice and encouragement!
    kevcoachk likes this.

    Kayak Angler, Red X Angler, and a Full Time Angler (as of 2/1/18!!!)Retirement!

  14. #12
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    Chris: What a great idea on the Windsor Bobber Planer. I've got larger side planers and a real cool product from Church's Tackle they call a stern planer for nearshore / offshore work, but I never considered applying that technique to trout. The Great Lakes / Midwest guys use those techniques for walleye and panfish. I'm going to steal that play from your playbook. Perfect for a slow presentation on the electric motor to get your bait away from the boat and in the zone.

  15. #13
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    Ive always wondered why the guys who troll never used planers like the walleye guys. I might give this a try one day to, though i normally just troll one bait while im casting on the bow.

  16. #14
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    I wrote a brief review on the Windsor Bobber Planers last week. I had tried to use the Church mini-planers, but they were just too big for my lightweight and medium weight equipment.

    I troll with my rods in a Scotty rod holder, out at a 90 degree angle to the boat and almost parallel to the water—in front of me so I can see them. I think the Windsor brand is the perfect size for yak fishing. I actually troll 3 baits, one left and right on the planers and a third directly behind the boat, and am getting a 30 foot spread. I carry a fourth rod for sight casting.
    Mumbo_Pungo likes this.

    Kayak Angler, Red X Angler, and a Full Time Angler (as of 2/1/18!!!)Retirement!

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