Do we have to carry flares on our boats?
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Thread: Do we have to carry flares on our boats?

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  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Default Do we have to carry flares on our boats?

    I just bought a new Tracker Pro Guide 175WT and sold my Sea Fox center console.....and when I sold the center console, I forgot and left all of the safety equipment in it.....heck I LEFT EVERYTHING in it. Anchor, rope, PFDs, safety equipment, etc.

    So I'm having to restock this new boat.

    I got the PFD's, got the throw cushion, got a whistle, and got a new fire extinguisher.


    I have a question about flares or "visual distress signal" as listed on the NC Wildlife website......it's not exactly clear if it's an actual requirement or a suggestion.

    Also aside from ensuring I have the right type of PFD, throwable, extinguisher, and a whistle is there anything else I am overlooking?

    I'm getting new anchor and dock rope. I'll also probably get a 1st aid kit.

  2. #2
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    Jun 2014
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    This is straight from the USCG Aux who did a vessel safety check for me last month (free):
    - current boat registration
    - nav lights anchor light, & horn working condition
    - appropriate size PFD for every person aboard (child/adult)
    - throwable
    - whistle
    - fire ext not expired
    - first aid kit
    - VHF working correctly if you have one
    - copy of the Nav rules/regs (I have it as an app, he didn't argue)
    - Flares highly recommended if staying inshore, flares required if you go out of the Inlet (words straight from them)
    highcj5 likes this.


  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by blueoceaneyez View Post
    This is straight from the USCG Aux who did a vessel safety check for me last month (free):
    - current boat registration
    - nav lights anchor light, & horn working condition
    - appropriate size PFD for every person aboard (child/adult)
    - throwable
    - whistle
    - fire ext not expired
    - first aid kit
    - VHF working correctly if you have one
    - copy of the Nav rules/regs (I have it as an app, he didn't argue)
    - Flares highly recommended if staying inshore, flares required if you go out of the Inlet (words straight from them)


    You're the man, thanks so much for posting this!

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  5. #4
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    Holly Springs & Oriental, NC
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    Default

    My understanding is that flares are only required when boating on Federally controlled waters. Having a daytime visual distress device, like a reflective mirror or blank CD, is a good idea and when safety checked they usually give you a blank CD if you do not have one.

    Federally controlled waters are confusing too.
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  6. #5
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  7. #6
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    Kernersville
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    Default

    It's a good idea to have something additional in the first aid kit for sea sickness. The kits never seem to have enough meds for sea sickness, and I forget to add sometimes when I trade boats.

  8. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fishscalz View Post
    It's a good idea to have something additional in the first aid kit for sea sickness. The kits never seem to have enough meds for sea sickness, and I forget to add sometimes when I trade boats.
    I've never seen any med wise that would help once you are sea sick, at least not otc. A very quick means of relief is,,, get in the water. I know that's the last place a sick person wants to be, but it does help.

  9. #8
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    The wrist bead bracelets work for me if I don't take a preemptive dose of seasick meds , ear patches work for some of my fishing friends.

    One of my favorite expressions about being seasick:

    "At first you are afraid you will die, then you are afraid you won't."

  10. #9
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    If its federally controlled water, you are required by the USCG to have day and nighttime distress signals aboard. Does not matter if inshore or offshore.

  11. #10
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    Also, since horns don’t always work, the whistle is a wise idea. I keep one on the key fob for my outboard and another tied to the compass. In addition, the throwable device (such as a cushion) is required to be readily accessible (not in a compartment). The Coasties pointed that out to me when they were doing random boardings in the ICW several years ago. In years past, you had to have a working bilge pump or some other way to bail. A small plastic bucket works wonders. If one fire extinguisher is good, three are better. That way, if a wasp has built a nest in the barrel of one or if one goes south and doesn’t have the arrow in the good zone, you have back up. And if you actually have a fire, I want plenty of stuff to help put it out. I understand the official fire extinguisher needs to be mounted on. The boat in an appropriate bracket. Just a few tips from many years of boating. Whitefish 115

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