Inshore Summer Trout
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 28

Thread: Summer Trout

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
    Location
    Kinston
    Posts
    22

    Default Summer Trout

    I have been fortunate enough to get out a few afternoons and mornings recently to do a little paddle fishing in the swansboro area and man has the trout bite been hot. Initially targeting reds and flounder my attention quickly was diverted to their speckled cousins. After watching some blow ups I have been able to find my limit of 17-21Ē fish most days in just an hour due to time constraints along with a few rats, blues and flounderClick image for larger version.†

Name:	IMG_0035.jpg†
Views:	126†
Size:	35.4 KB†
ID:	195431. At first I was under the impression it was the high tide shift that was producing the activityís but it seems to be more associated with sun position.

    They have been holding up current of oyster beds and have come on soft plastics of all colors as well as top water. Gona give the gugler clouser combo a shot today and see if I can break my cold streak on the fly.






    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk


  2. Remove Advertisements

    Advertisements
     

  3. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    3,224

    Default

    That's encouraging, thanks for the report...... ICM
    salpal likes this.


    My wife keeps saying I don't listen to her .... or something like that.

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
    Location
    Kinston
    Posts
    22

    Default

    Agreed ICM, should be a good fall.

    Managed an hour after work and the passing storms yesterday and didnít get the fly out but caught a few on on the spook jr. including my first topwater red. A little anti climatic since he was only about 12Ē but was an objective outing.

    Question about redfish, I have been catching rats consistently in the creeks where I have been fishing mostly this year. Typically I like to target reds behind the islands closer to the ocean and the fish are usually slot sized. Is there any driver behind this, seasonality or behavioral tendency of younger redfish to be in creeks vs more barrier island marsh/flats?

    Thanks


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  5. Remove Advertisements

    Advertisements
     

  6. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    3,224

    Default

    Try fishing closer to the inlets in this heat, would be my suggestion ..... ICM
    Saltwater Republic likes this.


    My wife keeps saying I don't listen to her .... or something like that.

  7. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Posts
    10

    Default

    I caught a 22 incher in the newriver underneath the bypass bridge. First time I have ever caught a trout in the summer.

    Sent from my Moto E (4) Plus using Tapatalk

  8. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
    Location
    Kinston
    Posts
    22

    Default

    Superbike1, Iíve been hearing solid reports of the new river all summer but have never made it down there. Might have to make the trip this fall. Would it be smart to assume working upriver of the Highway 17 or 24 bridge in the fall as the best game plan or do most of the small feeder creeks gold fish as well? Also good job on the 22Ēer .

    ICM, thanks for the advise. Do you think this is a salinity seasonal or temperature reaction of the fish? I donít own a refractometer or thermometer but the bait is everywhere so I donít think it has to do with that.

    Last query, do trout harbor worms/parasites in the summer? Fishing in Florida I was told the trout were not worth keeping due to worm content which was suppressing since I have always known the as good table fair. The most recent fish I filleted had what seemed to be a worm in the fillet but I wasnít 100% confident it was, could have been fat or other sliver of an internal organ.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  9. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Posts
    10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by salpal View Post
    Superbike1, Iíve been hearing solid reports of the new river all summer but have never made it down there. Might have to make the trip this fall. Would it be smart to assume working upriver of the Highway 17 or 24 bridge in the fall as the best game plan or do most of the small feeder creeks gold fish as well? Also good job on the 22Ēer .

    ICM, thanks for the advise. Do you think this is a salinity seasonal or temperature reaction of the fish? I donít own a refractometer or thermometer but the bait is everywhere so I donít think it has to do with that.

    Last query, do trout harbor worms/parasites in the summer? Fishing in Florida I was told the trout were not worth keeping due to worm content which was suppressing since I have always known the as good table fair. The most recent fish I filleted had what seemed to be a worm in the fillet but I wasnít 100% confident it was, could have been fat or other sliver of an internal organ.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    I haven't fished the up river part during the winter so I couldn't give an assessment. I fish the feeder creeks in the winter and do ok. Last year, there were a lot of small fish. Everyone says it will be great this year. I hope so. Out of the thousands of trout I caught last winter ( I do mean thousands) there were not many keeper size. I had some hundred or more fish days with none meeting the minimum size keeper limit. I will be back on those same creeks this winter to see if what the old timers are telling me is true.

    Sent from my Moto E (4) Plus using Tapatalk
    salpal likes this.


  10. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Swansboro
    Posts
    1,276

    Default

    Sal Pal: I'll try to answer some of your questions without claiming any more expertise than your average weekend warrior.

    Redfish tend to school up by size. Summer months those young of the year (10" - 12") take refuge in the shallows in the marshes where flipper, jaws and other predators have a hard time going. I think they have a little more heat tolerance than the larger fish who will gravitate to the deeper waters of the ICW, inlets and beaches where the water is cooler and more oxygenated. But they'll still go up to feed in the marshes as the tide comes in. A friend of mine got spooled by a 30" + red just this week on a trout rig up in the marsh shallows, and another friend of mine hooked and lost a 30 pound + fish up in the marsh grass a couple of years ago. As the water cools in the summer, the slot redfish, local and migratory, will be found in good numbers in the surf and close to inlets as the bait pours out and migrates south for the winter. Then, as the water cools and the bait thins out, many of those slot and slot + fish will move up into the marsh creeks for the winter. They follow the tides and move up into the small creeks and grass to feed during the highs then back down into the deeper holes in the larger creeks during the lows. I seen schools of over 100 fish up in those places. But it's shallow, the water is crystal clear, and their metabolism slows as the water gets cold, so stealth, long casts and down-sizing lures and leaders help a lot. There's another group of slot, slot + redfish that will stay in the surf, usually close to inlets, through most of the winter. Huge schools sometimes that can be caught from the shore if you're fortunate enough to find them or by backing a boat within casting distance of the surf zone if the swell is not too big--not something for a rookie boat handler as that can be very dangerous.

    As far as New River trout (and I'm no Ricky Kellum or Breadman or shaving off the ICM), they are spread throughout the main river system this time of year, and this year in very good numbers with some quality fish in the mix. You'll probably find better numbers closer to the inlet or ICW where the water is cooler and better oxygenated. Creek mouths and structure near them will hold fish. But there are still very good numbers in the main river from the Rt. 17 bridge down. General pattern is they will move onto the flats at night to feed on the finger mullet, pogies and shrimp that are there in big numbers right now. Find those flats (Google Earth is your friend), find bait and fish those areas with top waters, twitch baits, soft plastics and popping corks. On clear days, that bite is over by 7:30 - 8:00 AM as the fish move deeper. On cloudy days maybe a couple three hours later. They can still be caught later in the day but they are harder to find. As the fall months approach, usually after the first big blow in late Aug or early Sep, those fish will school up. Some, which I believe are resident fish, school up near the main creek mouths-- SW, NE and main stem near and above the Rt. 17 bridge. Those fish move progressively up into those creeks as water cools and bait thins out, then they over winter in the deep holes, sometimes way upstream where the water is almost fresh. Another group, which I think are migratory, school up in the inlets, ICW, creeks off the ICW and off the beaches. They'll remain there until it gets too cold, the bait disappears or the strike netters scoop them all up.

    As far as worms, I've never encountered any trout in the New River that were excessively wormy, though nearly all nearshore fish will have some parasites, usually not visible to the naked eye. That's why you shouldn't eat them raw in sashimi or ceviche. I've eaten trout out of New River for many years, and so far the wife hasn't had to take me to the vet for de-worming.


  11. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
    Location
    Kinston
    Posts
    22

    Default

    Superbike1: I think the zeitgeist on how this years fall fishing will he is correct and I am very excited. I look forward to hearing how it works out for you in the New river. I hope to expand my stomping grounds that way but itís easy to stick to what you know especially when queens and the white oak are at my back door.

    Bmac: thank you for your thorough local analysis of the fisheries. Very interesting, You have built upon my own knowledge/guess on what they do quite a bit. I have never had luck with the deep holes at low tide and mainly fish high tide marshes and the winter surf my self.

    As for worms/parasites, the trout was delicious. I am curious why parasites are more prevalent in some species, my guess is food sources but I feel like I find a lot more worms in black drum than sheepshead I catch in the same area.




    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  12. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    Swannanoa
    Posts
    53

    Default

    Floridian transplant here and I have a degree in Wildlife biology. Not an expert but can help some with the parasite question. Black drum due to the fact they get rather lethargic the bigger they get, habitat and diet are the reason why their at the top of the list for worms/parasites. Black drum love shellfish, barnacles etc.. take a good look at a living barnacle and you can see the worms/parasites growing on the shells. Smaller drum "Normally" do not have worms. To me they are better eating anyways. Supposedly these worms are not harmful to humans if cooked ! but I do not personally want to knowingly eat a worm !!! I have never seen many in sheepshead either, it would seem they would also have alot, since they also love shellfish. Maybe because they have such small mouths and nibble at their food, maybe they kill the worms before digestion.

    Seatrout, same logic applies and is the same for most species when it comes to parasites/worms, mercury and other toxin levels "Heavy metals". The older/larger the fish more of all the above is very possible. There is a good series on youtube on how to recognize worms in saltwater fish, worth watching. Happy fishing


  13. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    52

    Default

    Lots of good info on here.... Cant wait for fall weather. Hate it for my garden but love it for my freezer.
    LIVIT, and salpal like this.


  14. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    Swannanoa
    Posts
    53

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Saltwater Republic View Post
    Lots of good info on here.... Cant wait for fall weather. Hate it for my garden but love it for my freezer.
    I hear ya on this. But the trade off, with the excellent fishing for me is worth it.

  15. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Raleigh
    Posts
    258

    Default

    Don't wait for the fall. I have been catching trout all year. Especially on the lower Pamlico and Neuse. A bad day of fishing is under 15 trout. We've had days where we have caught them on every cast.

  16. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
    Location
    Kinston
    Posts
    22

    Default

    Was able to go out again this morning and was able to limit with a decent batch before sunrise. But after a few more decided to venture out and look for some other species while the overcast conditions held. No luck there. all fish came on sub surface smoke color soft plastics.

    Gona try bear creek this afternoon. Anyone know what the upstream portion of the creek is like? Does it get deep when it narrows or does it stay shallow?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  17. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    3,224

    Default

    Enough talk get out there & fish.
    Sunday's cold front had them chewing.
    Monday was a little slower but bigger Trout..... ICM
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version.†

Name:	DSCN5373 (2).jpg‎†
Views:	232†
Size:	65.6 KB†
ID:	195511Click image for larger version.†

Name:	DSCN5389.jpg‎†
Views:	230†
Size:	81.5 KB†
ID:	195513


    My wife keeps saying I don't listen to her .... or something like that.

  18. Remove Advertisements

    Advertisements
     

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts