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Thread: Neon fly line

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
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    274

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dylar View Post
    The key is that fish are looking up into the light, not down into the darkness. How strong a silhouette the line cuts is more important than the color, and darker, neutral colored lines definitely have a more distinct silhouette.
    Always the contrarian!!! Hah

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  3. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
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    Stallings
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    Tippet itself, if it is in the film, shows a distinct shadow/silhouette under the water. (This month's "Fly Tyer" magazine has an excellent article on what trout see, although the tippet study isn't in it). In the past year, I've started slicking my tippets (almost always fluorocarbon) so they aren't on the surface, but slightly sunk, even on the dries. Not the entire leader, just the couple feet ahead of the first fly, and if a double-dry setup (usually something tiny as a dropper on a indicator dry), on the dropper section of tippet. Last year about this time I had an eye-opening day on the Davidson, experimenting with slicking leaders and tippets...when the lines were slicked to float, in the film, often the fish (mind you, these were 10-12 foot leaders, with the fly line itself well out of sight of the fish) would just drift to the side out of the way as the double-dry rig floated by. The results were much different when i slicked those lines to sink- i actually started to catch a fish now and then, and I'd get many more looks as opposed to outright refusals.
    This year, I found (at least in the Hog Trough/Desperation Hole) that actually staying out of the water can have a big impact as well. Those steps work best as casting platforms; even caught a couple risers no more than 25-30 feet away from me by slicking the lines to sink (still slicking the flies themselves to float) and staying out of the water. At least there, on that "technical" water, it makes a big difference.
    salpal likes this.

    Lifelong fishing nut. Wish I was fishin, instead of wishing!

  4. #18
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    Jun 2009
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    Stallings
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    I agree on the silhouette of the line making a difference; I love my Rio Single-hand Spey line, but getting it to land with any "softness" or "delicacy" is out of the question, and it is a fat line, casting a substantial shadow. My Rio gold line is much better for delicate presentations, and casts a much thinner shadow.
    That being said, I still say, if you're doing it right, THE FISH WILL NEVER SEE YOUR LINE ANYWAY... if they do, you're fishing at the wrong angle or your leader isn't long enough!
    Lifelong fishing nut. Wish I was fishin, instead of wishing!

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  6. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
    Location
    Kinston
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    My question was intended to be a trout specific application but I live at the coast so either response is relevant.

    The responses are even more relevant in that when I do get the opportunity to trout fish I have typically have to dust off some cobwebs and donít approach/ present the fly as I well as intended. So it could play more of a roll for angler if my caliber.

    For the stick imitation theory, I noticed there are frequently plants ( looks light light green monkey grass) on and around the bank full area and mid or point bars that are similar to the bright green color line I just bought. Slightly different profile. So Iím leaning toward color might not matter for most of the waters I fish for trout.

    From what Iím picking up I need to practice more and stop worrying about my line color.

    What product are you using to sink your line? Nose pit grease or a bought product?




    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  7. #20
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    Jun 2009
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    Stallings
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    878

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    I use Gink (float) and Xink (sink). Frogs fanny and fairy dust/Flyagra for the big and bushy deer hair flies. Xink to sink tippets, though.
    salpal likes this.

    Lifelong fishing nut. Wish I was fishin, instead of wishing!

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    4,349

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    I got some new line that is bright yellow after years of using dark green lines. We will see if it makes a difference. I think not
    salpal likes this.


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