I'm going to start taking a string trimmer with me
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Thread: I'm going to start taking a string trimmer with me

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2020
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    Chapel Hill
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    Default I'm going to start taking a string trimmer with me

    Do you guys ever see this? A place where there's a nice creek, and its legal to be there and fish... but while it's legal to fish, the powers-that-be don't do anything specific to cater to fishermen. As a result, the bank is all overgrown with weeds that are knee high or more... and almost certainly full of copperheads, water moccasins,king cobras, pit vipers, black mamba's, alligators, crocodiles, barracuda, piranha, great white sharks, rusty nails, broken glass, and a 1978 Ford Pinto.

    Anyway, I've found a few places I could fish, if I had snake proof gaiters with me, or was willing to risk wading through this little pseudo rain forest that has grown up around the creek. I'm seriously (not joking) tempted to buy a portable, cordless, electric string trimmer and keep it in my truck. I find a spot like this, I can mow myself a path down to the bank. I'm sure I'd get some weird looks running a trimmer beside a bridge embankment along the edge of a road, but it might just be worth it.
    Dr Steve, and drjon like this.


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  3. #2
    Join Date
    May 2015
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    350

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    I’m not a shore fisherman. I do have a friend in Chicago who frequents many ponds and in the winter when the vegetation has died back he goes into lumberjack mode and trims trees and clears brush that will allow him shore access during the growing season. He will often drag the larger limbs out on to the frozen pond. When the ice melts he has instant structure ,plus he knows where it is.
    Trim away my friend.
    ~JOE~
    mindcrime likes this.

    Ad maiorem Dei gloriam


  4. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
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    High Point
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    A machete may be a better option. You don't have to worry about accidental electrocution (or destroying your trimmer) if you fall in the water and it makes a good weapon for encounters with snakes or that '78 Pinto.

    Brush busting is part of stream fishing. The best way to combat it is to just get in and wade. Waders and a machete are cheaper than electric trimmer anyway.
    meenyt, mindcrime, and noseman12 like this.

    Tight lines,
    Andrew

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  6. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
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    Apex
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    "copperheads, water moccasins,king cobras, pit vipers, black mamba's, alligators, crocodiles, barracuda, piranha, great white sharks, rusty nails, broken glass, and a 1978 Ford Pinto."

    You forgot poison ivy!

    I have one river I fish that is posted but I was able to trade trail work for access. So far I have hauled a string trimmer, chainsaw, pole saw, mower and a hoe out there. Well worth it.
    drjon, and mindcrime like this.


  7. #5
    Join Date
    May 2020
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    If this is legal then I'm going to start doing this. Just out of curiosity, what kind of location do you find your creeks in? Using my best judgement here, if it's in a suburb or something I won't, but if its more rural and people can't see me from the road, I might start chopping things down.

  8. #6
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    Mar 2020
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    Chapel Hill
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    Quote Originally Posted by TopKek View Post
    If this is legal then I'm going to start doing this. Just out of curiosity, what kind of location do you find your creeks in?
    It varies, but a lot of times I find creek access from land that is owned by local government units: county, town, city, etc., that is nominally for some utilitarian purpose: maintenance shed, wastewater treatment plant, pumping station, or just undeveloped land that appears to have no specific purpose at all. Often times these spots are a bit "out of the way", at the end of a long dirt road or something, and there's never anybody around. I mean, how often does somebody actually need to go out to the pumping station to adjust something, or fix a broken pump? Even more so after normal working hours or on weekends, there's almost never anybody around.

    So I figure if it's govt. owned, isn't specifically posted as "no trespassing / no fishing" and there's nearly zero chance of encountering anybody "official" out there, then it's a decent place to fish. And if they get a little bit of free yard work from me, they probably aren't going to complain.

    There are obviously also state owned right-of-way areas along roadsides, but with those, the one thing is that you're pretty much by definition somewhere where you're going to be seen. I don't think there's anything particularly illegal about fishing from those spots, unless there's a sign specifically prohibiting it, but you might get some weird looks or attract undue attention doing too much "mowing" out there. I'd probably chance it if the spot looked juicy enough though.

    To that end I went to Lowes this weekend and picked up some tools. No, not a string trimmer, although that is still on the list. But I grabbed a sling-blade, some long-handled clipping shears, a machete, etc. to use for doing some access clearing stuff.

  9. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    Clayton
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    Default

    Shrubs trimming hand saw comes in handy also. Machete can slip and hit shins, knees, other body parts if careless while using. Maybe first aid kit also. Treat clothes with permitherin or other tick killer. Last river access ticks where falling from branches while hacking a new trail.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    drjon, and mindcrime like this.


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