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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey gang
I found a LiquidLogic Stingray 12 "blemished" at a local retailer - $545 includes $100 off for the blemish. Looks like not a bad sit-inside... one of the salesmen said it compares favorably with the current Pungos -- I'd heard their hulls are nice enough that their 12-footer compares well with some 14's.

The "console" behind the seat seems to be a unique feature -- there's a space with molded rod-holders and water-bottle holders, and probably enough room left for a small bait bucket, with a heavy bungee to hold everything in place. I took a rod by the store and was satisfied with how it held the rod -- the bungee is good and strong -- although you'll have to finesse it a bit if you want the rod leaning out in a classic trolling arrangement.

Any thoughts from any veterans?
Thanx - kevin
 

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I'm sponsored by Liquidlogic so this may be a little biased :D The Stingray is a really cool boat. The large cockpit makes it ideal for bringing a fish inside the boat and removing hooks instead of laying him on the deck and potentially losing it. The console behind the seat will hold two rods and two Nalgene bottles which make pretty good tackle holders. You could also put a small tackle bag there instead. Trolling may be difficult with two rods since it's hard to get a spread. The rod holders are mainly just for storing the rods. The deck is ideal for mounting Scotty rod holders in different locations.

Did you see the Stingray at Great Outdoor Provision Company? We have several "blemishes" ourselves at that price. They are marked DEMO but have never been used.

Be on the lookout this spring for the Manta Ray lineup from Liquidlogic. This is the sit on top fishing kayak from them that is available in 12 and 14 feet. It is the most customizable boat in the market. There are more flat surfaces than any other sit on top out there, a large center console, anchor trolley mounts, and a 400+ pound capacity.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
If the Manta's due out "this spring", I guess y'all expect it to be on hand for the Demo events in April, right? Any idea what ballpark the price might be in (if there's a public statement to that effect)? I'm looking for a low-dollar boat, not the best mousetrap money can buy.

I'm kinda leaning toward the sit-inside, in hopes that it might stretch the fishing season a step or two. It really seems to me that on most of the sit-on-tops, you'd be sitting in half an inch of water at least enough of the time that your fanny would be damp more often than not. (I guess it's not entirely fair to point out that the eskimos -- I mean native alaskan americans -- didn't use sit-on-tops... I guess it would have been pretty hard to rotomold animal skins, ha ha.)
Kevin
 

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The Manta Ray should be on hand by the time spring demos begin. The price is around $715 and includes 3 hatches and a seat. That is comparable to the best selling and widely used Tarpon 140s.

If you plan on doing much fishing in the winter you will need a wetsuit either way you go.. sit on top or sit inside. I suggest a pair of 3mm wetsuit pants and some good booties. That will run you around $100. I use those in my sit on top and am very comfortable in them.

Sit ins are not very ideal for fishing. The Stingray is the first start and is very capable to a point. The thing that makes sit on tops superior are the open decks and tankwells. Everything can be placed within arms reach without having to fumble with hatches or bags.

Sit insides are not dry either unless you use a skirt. Skirts make the kayak hot and humid. You also lose access to the inside of the cockpit when using one unless you want to keep popping it on and off. You also need a sponge or hand pump to get excess water out if you are splashed or flip. In a sit on top water runs right out of the scuppers. Either way you go, you will get wet whether it's your paddle drip, wave splash, fish, or other boats waves.

In the end you should paddle both styles before you buy. Bring a rod and anything you plan on taking regularly with you so you can test different layouts. Fishing today is a lot different than when the Inuits first tried :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
So it sounds like they're aiming for Manta to compete pretty directly with Tarpon and the OK Prowler. It sounds like you'd suggest that fishing was more of an afterthought for Tarpon and Prowler, but more of an integral design goal for Manta?
 

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Both the Tarpon and Prowler are built for fishing if that's what you're asking. The Manta Ray is a fishing platform that offers more areas to mount your accessories. The entire back around the tankwell is flat as opposed to two circles for flush mounts on the Prowler and the curved rear of the Tarpon. In the Manta Ray you'll be able to put Scotty or RAM accessories anywhere that suit you. The same with the front console. In the Tarpon you have two areas for Scotty and the Prowler gives you a little more room. The Prowler 13 has one Scotty and a second cup holder that is kind of useless. I've seen people use it for RAM but adjusting it is difficult.

Also, the recessed areas on the side of the Manta Ray in the front and rear allow for easy rigging of an anchor trolley instead of tying line to the front and rear grab handles.

Simply, I think the Manta Ray is a big improvement over other fishing kayaks when it comes to outfitting.
 

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Lefty, we might be able to help you a little more if we knew what you planned on fishing for and when/ where? The manta's being sit on tops will be great for poking around in salt marshes and will handle the open ocean as long as it isn't too rough.The sting ray's are designed for lake fishing and I for one prefer that type sit in for lakes and piedmont/ coastal plains rivers. As far as accessories I would keep it as light and simple as possible. It is really determined more by how and where you fish. Don't add anything you don't really need. It is a common mistake by many people to get caught up in the moment when outfitting a boat and go to far. Kayak fishing has been around a long time but the California boats with their tons of accessories and may look cool but they are used in an area that sees little wind and the waves there are slow moving swells with little to no chop. Currently nobody in the US builds a "fishing kayak" that I would recommend for going more than a couple or three miles offshore in the Atlantic or Gulf. As for fishing the sit on tops are at their best in the salt marsh. A lot of fishermen in TX and FL use them to get to wade fishing areas where power boaters can't go and then wadefish primarily. Most new boaters seem more inclined to stay in their boats and do a lot of exploring and that is great too. You can cover a lot of ground in either type boat. Allen Stancill designed both boats. He has been designing rotomold kayaks for about as long as anybody could have. His hull designs are great. He is not a serious fisherman but you can't hold that against him. At least he does pick up a rod and fish now and then. I think you will find either boat easy to paddle, seaworthy and stable. AL
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Well, as far as the type and location of fishing I'd like to do...

My home is closest to Lake Jordan, so I figure that's where most of the time would be spent. It's only 30 minutes away, compared with at least 2 hours to get to salty water. I'd really like, however, to explore the coastal estuaries I've been hearing folks talk about. I haven't done much freshwater fishing at all lately, but all of my saltwater catches (from the surf) over the last 12 months were more fun than what I remember from landing bream as a kid. I've never gotten the attention of a bass, but I'd like to try.

CoachKinsey gets to go fishing all summer long after he sends his high-school students home for the summer. I've gotta work. I'd love to be able to knock off early and go catch up with him and fish through the summer sunsets every now and then. I'd been thinking sit-inside in hopes of perhaps stretching the season a bit. (Hot and humid inside a sit-inside kayak doesn't sound so unwelcome this time of year. How bad does it get in the summer with no skirt on top?)

Some folks have said that since Jordan is so big, I'd appreciate a long boat to help me get from point A to point B more efficiently. My first reaction to that was that I'd rather choose a put-in point closer to Point B in the first place. Coach, any comments on how much time you've spent traveling versus fishing on Jordan?

As for grandiose plans, I like the idea of being able to paddle over to Hammocks Beach SP or a camping weekend, but that really sounds like I'd need more cargo capacity than you can get from a 55-lb kayak, so I'm about concluded that I'd want a different boat for that trip.

Having said all this, I'm in a research and holding mode at the moment anyway. Gotta get those dead presidents lined up in a more fiscally responsible order before I can buy anything of this magnitude. I'm planning on hitting the April demos when they come around -- not sure whether I'll be ready to buy at that time or not, to be honest.

Thanks for the thoughts.
Kevin
 

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Since kayaks are the subject, what does anyone think of the Heritage Redfish 14' Angler? In their specs it sounds like it would be a great all around pick. It's 31" wide will hold 400 lbs., and they say it manuevers well on class 1 and 2 white water. Look forward to your comments, since I'm planning to buy this spring. Thanks, Ken
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
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<edit - post is changing to discussion of Heritage Redfish 14>
Hey Ken,
I've got that boat. Picked it up at a truckload sale in your neighborhood (GetOutdoors GBO) this past august and have been very happy with it. Super stable, paddles plenty fast enough to keep up with or stay ahead of the crowd. Enough capacity to hold me (6'4", 250+) and any stuff I bring. Very dry inside (with scuppers plugged). Haven't done much to it - 2 flush mount rod holders and a screw-top storage hatch behind the seat and a scotty with an extension on the console. Need to get a depthfinder on it, pronto.

Haven't had it on any kind of whitewater but have been out in Snows cut on the intercoastal, fending off the cruiser wakes and put lots of time on Falls & Jordan this fall & winter.

The biggest negative cited about the pre-2007 redfish is the limited storage and the smallish hatch in the front. The cockpit floor is flat and filled with foam between the top & bottom (presumably for floor stability), so there is no real way to store anything (ie. rods) under the cockpit. I've heard rumor that the 2007 redfish will have the bigger oval hatch which will allow much more flexibility getting stuff in & out of the front.

Glad to answer any specific questions you might have.

Jeff O
 
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