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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just joined the site.
Moved down here from Minnesota.
My question is, all my gear is for freshwater. Can I use it for saltwater or will it rust easy?
Anyother advice is greatly appreciated!
 

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Red X Angler
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Salt playes "Hades" on freshwater gear, just be sure to flush it good with fresh water as soon as you can. It depends somewhat on the brand or quality your using too as some better stuff is more stainless/composite parts than others.
You'll get plenty of freshwater action in the Cape Fear river over your way too!
 

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I would say use it. But when u are done fishing just make sure you give it a good spray down. I have a couple of freshwater reels that i have had for a while now, just so u clean them they are good to go.
 

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I grew up with salt water but seldom get there now. The advice to flush with plenty of fresh water is the best you can do, but be sure to include any chrome rod guides and include your lures and other tackle. That small stuff corrodes too and is easy to overlook....and it's expensive to replace.
 

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You have plenty of fresh water right at your finger tips. Plenty of lakes on Bragg.

Freshwater gear can be and is used in the salt all the time. As long as its not completely submerged for periods of time you should be fine. like they said a good flush when you get back home will help trememdously.

tight lines and welcome to the board.
 

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My question is, all my gear is for freshwater. Can I use it for saltwater or will it rust easy?
You can use your gear for saltwater fishing. Depending on how well made it is and how much care you give it will be the difference in how well it holds up to the salt. For instance, I mainly use the Shimano Stradic reels for my saltwater inshore fishing. The Stradic is classified by Shimano as a freshwater reel.

Most reel makers will tell you not to FLUSH, DUNK or hit it with a HEAVY spray. This can result in the freshwater pushing the saltwater further into the reel. Instead, they recommend using a light spray of freshwater. It's also important to keep the reel well lubed. Another potential problem area is the rod guides (if made from metal), make sure you rinse them off and be sure to get the underside too.

Another rule I abide to for my rod and reels: if it goes with me, it gets cleaned. Even if I don't use it, just being exposed to the salt air or mist can cause problem down the road.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
From all the fast replies I think I should be good to go!
I run a collection of Stradic Reels w/ St. Croix rods.
I love the Stradic Mgf 1000

I'm heading out to Holden Beach to try my hand at Flounder fishing!
I hear they bite like a walleye, but you have to wait a long time to set the hook? (10 Seconds???)
Don't know if I can wait the long when I know a fish has my hook in its mouth!

Thanks for the info guys.
 

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I just spray em off after I get back and have never had a problem. I have some Mitchells that I inherited from my dad that have been fishing the salt for 30 years or more with no problem.

And just like TA said if its in the boat make sure it gets the hose.
 

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I'm heading out to Holden Beach to try my hand at Flounder fishing!
I hear they bite like a walleye, but you have to wait a long time to set the hook? (10 Seconds???)
Don't know if I can wait the long when I know a fish has my hook in its mouth!

Thanks for the info guys.
When using live bait, especially finger mullets, you need to wait to set the hook. I'm not sure how Walleye bite but often a flounder bite is nothing more than some tightening or tension on the line. The flounder will pick-up the bait and then settle down on the bottom very nearby. They don't usually grab and run like some fish. The reason you have to wait is often they will "turn" the fish around in their mouth so if you try to set the hook too soon you will pull the bait out of their mouth.

If you are using artificial lures, set the hook as soon as you detect a bite.
 

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From all the fast replies I think I should be good to go!
I run a collection of Stradic Reels w/ St. Croix rods.
I love the Stradic Mgf 1000

I'm heading out to Holden Beach to try my hand at Flounder fishing!
I hear they bite like a walleye, but you have to wait a long time to set the hook? (10 Seconds???)
Don't know if I can wait the long when I know a fish has my hook in its mouth!

Thanks for the info guys.
I have seen on some websites that there could be problems with the Shimano spinning and baitcasting reels that have magnesium in them being more prone to corrosion because of the reaction between saltwater and the magnesium.
 
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