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Thought I'd lob this question out knowing some of you guys will have some great advice. Most of my bass fishing success has been on lakes or on lower water conditions when the current is minimal. As you all know, we've had rain regularly this year. Given I work like most of you, I have to fish when I can and can't necessarily take off when the conditions are ideal. I like in southern Pitt County and have ready access to the Neuse and Tar Rivers as well as Contentnea Creek.

So, here's the question - what is your advice for fishing higher and moving water? Go to baits? I like to fish weightless worms wacky rigged. Thoughts on adding a bullet weight to fish the worms? Go to jig and trailers? Spinner baits?

Thanks in advance for advice.

(over/under on excellent advice from Scott Hobbs is three hours! :D)
 

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As a shallow water guy, high water is often a welcome sight for me. Flipping plastic and jigs around flooded cover is my method of choice for high water, a spinnerbait or buzzbait can be good to.

In most lakes in NC, when the water rises the fish hit the bank and will get on nearly anything. Kerr Lake is famous for it's flooded bush and sweetgum tree bite in the spring.

In a river where increased current may be a factor, look for current breaks, slack water areas and cuts off the main river that are out of the current.
 

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If you try contentnea you better have a buzzer on. Suggestion for the high rivers is to get out of them. Any slough or creek that is in the banks or close to it will be better. If the river is in the banks you are in business pretty much anywhere for the two mentioned.
 

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I'm with Neilslure. I'm a shallow water guy also, and with the rainy past few years we've had, it's really forced me to learn how to fish mud.
For lakes, beat the banks. This time of year, pitching to shallow cover is my favorite in muddy water. Chatterbaits, spinnerbaits, and shallow cranks are also great. I love to fish a wacky worm, but high and muddy is usually not the time.
As for rivers, some river guys may have some better advice, but if it's high, I fish the creeks. If the water is over the banks in the creeks like it is right now in my neck of the woods, I'd go to a lake instead.
 

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High water doesn't always mean muddy water...Lake Norman, for instance, is pretty high right now and for most of the lake, it is still relatively clear. Even here, the bass that aren't on beds are pulling up to shallow cover, whether that be brush, trees, ramps or docks.

Jigs, jerk baits, squarebills and spinnerbaits can be pretty good for these fish.

With muddy water, visual baits become less effective and vibrating/rattling baits are better. Jigs with rattles attached, spinnerbaits and rattling squarebills can be good for these times.

When it's muddy, the bass relate tighter to the cover, using it as a wall...sort of like when someone turns the lights out on us...we try to feel our way around and the walls of the house help us feel our way around. Fish do this also, to an extent, using the edges of walls, rocks or wood to "feel" their way around, too.

Fish tight to the cover in the mud, fish shallow in any water clarity. The clearer the water, the more stealth may be needed.
 

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High water doesn't always mean muddy water.
That is very true. Depending on the layout of the lake and where most of the water inflow comes from, cleaner water is almost always available somewhere, you just have to look for it. I remember fishing Kerr one weekend, it had come up a bunch the previous week and we got another torrential down pour late that week, the lake came up a foot between the time I put in and took out, i was still able to find water i would call clear.
 
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