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I use them in saltwater but they work the same way as the freshwater ones. I mainly use the C-rig when livebait fishing but sometimes with dead natural bait or with soft plastics.

Connect a hook to a piece of 15 - 18 inch leader material (I use fluorocarbon and like to use the snell method), on the other end of the leader attach a swivel (no snap). Optionally you also can add colored beads and a spinner blade in between the hook and swivel. Then add an egg weight to you mainline (it has a hole through the center for your line), a plastic bead below the weight to keep it from jamming on the swivel (I also like to put one above to to protect my rod tip), then attach the swivel from the snelled hook leader.

Try dragging it across the bottom in a slow drift (on a boat) or by retrieving slowly (boat or shore). I like to pause often when using live bait and allow the fish to swim around. I also sometimes just throw one out on the bottom (live bait) and leave it there while I'm casting with another line. I use circle hooks so if something takes the bait while unattended it usually results in a hook-up.

Hope you catch 'em up!
 

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I pulled this from a previous thread that I posted to.

The way I rig a C-Rig is with a barrel swivel tied to the main line with a glass or plastic bead above it to protect the knot and a 1/4-3/4 egg sinker or brass bullet weight above the bead, then a 24"-48" leader tied to the other end of the barrel swivel with a 2/0 worm hook. let the weight slide freely. Here is a link to a good article on C-Rigs.
Learn These Bass Fishing Rigs, Texas Rig, Carolina Rig, Floating Rig


Mark
 
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I'm kinda curious ..
Why the swivel ... why not a continuous line with a split shot as a stopper for the sinker.
Is the concept that the bead/sinker/swivel banging together makes an attrator noise valid ??
Or .. are two different strength lines used .. the lighter being the leader to be less visible and afford more lifelike presentation..
 

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I'm kinda curious ..
Why the swivel ... why not a continuous line with a split shot as a stopper for the sinker.
Is the concept that the bead/sinker/swivel banging together makes an attrator noise valid ??
Or .. are two different strength lines used .. the lighter being the leader to be less visible and afford more lifelike presentation..
Two reasons really - one so that you can use a leader that is harder to see and at the same time tougher than your main line, number two - no matter how hard you crimp that tspilt shot, the egg weight will cause it to move down the line and you end up with everything down by the hook.
 

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There are other ways to rig soft plastics for bass that will work well and sometimes better. For stair stepping down steep points a jighead works better. For worming rip rap jigheads quickly get expensive so pegging a texas rigged 1/4 oz. sinker or going weightless is better. For fishing cover, if you need a weight , texas rigs or weighted hooks work best.
The reason the carolina rig is popular, is because it is very effective in finding cooperative fish. It is an excellent open water search tool. Once you catch a couple from a spot with a carolina rig it is often time to switch to something different. Especially if the water is clear or you are catching spotted bass. Spotted bass tend to pull off of a spot and gravitate toward the boat after a few casts. A spoon, spinnerbait or crankbait is often a better choice for spots after you have caught a couple. If the fish aren't actively feeding they will become sensitized to a lure in only a couple of fish in clear water.
 

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I'm not much of a bass fisherman (I use to bass fish many, many years ago) so something always puzzles me when people advise to find the bass with a c-rig then change rigs. - If you are catching them - why would you change rigs? Sounds similar to leaving fish to go find fish. But I'm sure there is good reasoning behind it so I ask.
 

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I'm not much of a bass fisherman (I use to bass fish many, many years ago) so something always puzzles me when people advise to find the bass with a c-rig then change rigs. - If you are catching them - why would you change rigs? Sounds similar to leaving fish to go find fish. But I'm sure there is good reasoning behind it so I ask.
Alot of times they will hit it but won't take it. So if they are just playing with it, I will switch to a crank bait to get reaction strikes and so forth.

Also like mentioned in another forum, structure can move or you know around abouts where it is. The C-rig will allow you to make long casts and feel what is on the bottom.

Hope that helps.
 

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If you are catching them - why would you change rigs? ...But I'm sure there is good reasoning behind it so I ask.
I always thought that the tackle monkey was responsible for that. I hear this whisper that there's probably something in the box that will work even better on these cooperative fish. If it doesn't, then I have to go to the store and see what else I can find to try next time...
 

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Freshwater fish are a little different from saltwater fish in their reactions to lures. If you find a school of freshwater fish and catch a couple they rapidly become sensitized to what is pulling their brethern up to the surface. Freshwater trout are even more tuned in than bass and crappie. White perch are less likely to turn off after 25 fish than any of the above are after just a couple of fish. Crappie are somewhere between bass and white perch. Biologist say that a distressed fish emits chemicals that that alert other fish to danger. Whatever causes the reaction I have watched it take place many times. I have found that with trout after two fish from one hole it is time to move on upstream. Nothing is going to change their minds but time. With bass you can generally catch one or two more with a reaction type lure or something totally different than what you caught the first one or two on. (Example: Switching from a worm to a jigging spoon.) In murky water you might not experience such a dramatic shutdown of the bite but when you have 30' of visibility you can count on it. I've been there and done that many times on clear lakes. Believe it or not crappie will some times shut down on you and you can change colors of the grub and you will catch 3 or 4 more before they shut down again. Switch tail colors again and catch a few more. I spotted a big school towards the end of a bass fishing trip with my cousin and we decided that we would try and catch enough for a 2 family fish fry. I had the only rod that was light enough. I caught 25 and handed him the rod and he caught abought 10-12 more before we decided that both the fish and us had had enough. We had to keep switching colors but luckily I knew the deal and was prepared. My family, his family, our grandfather and one of our aunts were well fed that evening because we knew to keep switching colors.
 
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