NC Angler Forums banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had heard from a couple places that carp will sometimes kill off other freshwater fish populations because they eat all the nutrients from the pond. Does anyone know for sure if this can or will happen? I'm asking because my family has some farm ponds in Louisburg that my buddies and i fish pretty often and one of the better ponds has eight carp that were pretty recently put in and i was worried about the effect they will have especially on the bass and catfish populations.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
59 Posts
dgw - I think this may just possibly be one of those 'old wives tales'.. unless your pond is very short of food I suspect that 80 carp would not have any impact, let alone 8. If you want 'em out though, I'd be happy to help catch and move then for you;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
493 Posts
Carp are not going to be harmful to the ponds. They may impact the catfish some, because they will forage stuff while cleaning up the bottom, but I don't believe the cats will be in any danger. Should be plenty of food for all. I'd worry more about run-off chemicals and acid rains.
 
  • Like
Reactions: dgw89

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,911 Posts
possibly pushing further down the wives tale path...but I think this some of this makes sense.

I've heard of (and seen) places where the carp population has overrun the available food supply (weeds), and turned a cover-rich, healthy lake into a barren bowl. Other fish still survive, but its certainly not as easy for the little ones to hide from the predators, which could hurt the population. Also as a fisherman I like some amount of weeds, because it defines the highways and ambush points that the predators use. Somewhere between too many weeds and too few weeds lies the right balance. If I were doing it I'd start with a small number (below recommendations) and see how it went for a year or two before increasing.

Another challenge might be competition for spawning areas - if you have a pond with very little good spawning habitat, the carp roiling around in the shallows might be a problem for the bass and panfish. Maybe not in eating eggs, but in spoiling beds and pushing the spawning fish away. I suspect they'll find a way to do their business anyway, but it could be a factor.

Among wives tales that I have heard but cannot confirm are that the sterile introduced carp sometimes figure out a way to reproduce and overrun a lake.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
59 Posts
Jeff - interesting points indeed - some further thoughts/observations:
I have fished very many waters containing (common) carp which have heavy weed growth too - would agree that grass carp are voracious weed eaterers (that's their assigned role when introduced into many city lakes).

I've also noticed that catfish are very active in areas carp are spawning in - sure they love to eat eggs and fry. An example in a lake I currently fish with a lot of flatheads - it contains few if any commons less that 10 lbs.

No experience of sterile (grass) carp spawning, but who knows in nature.

Suspect it is all around balance of carp numbers versus richness of water and other fish density -
All the best
Tim
possibly pushing further down the wives tale path...but I think this some of this makes sense.

I've heard of (and seen) places where the carp population has overrun the available food supply (weeds), and turned a cover-rich, healthy lake into a barren bowl. Other fish still survive, but its certainly not as easy for the little ones to hide from the predators, which could hurt the population. Also as a fisherman I like some amount of weeds, because it defines the highways and ambush points that the predators use. Somewhere between too many weeds and too few weeds lies the right balance. If I were doing it I'd start with a small number (below recommendations) and see how it went for a year or two before increasing.

Another challenge might be competition for spawning areas - if you have a pond with very little good spawning habitat, the carp roiling around in the shallows might be a problem for the bass and panfish. Maybe not in eating eggs, but in spoiling beds and pushing the spawning fish away. I suspect they'll find a way to do their business anyway, but it could be a factor.

Among wives tales that I have heard but cannot confirm are that the sterile introduced carp sometimes figure out a way to reproduce and overrun a lake.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,834 Posts
I know that several Wildlife agencies have stocked the Triploid Grass Carp in a lot of waters to control vegetation. However, I have been unable to find any information where they may have caused either the nutrients or oxygen in a body of water to be depleted or reduced. I can see the above point that they could be responsible for turning a lake barren if too many were introduced.

Here's a link to a company that Bill Dance is involved with that design and manage Bass Ponds and lakes Aqua Services Inc. Aquatic Vegetation Management . I think there are some tips on their site that you may find useful.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top