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Red X Angler
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Today broncotwisterjim, Calabash513 and myself got together to see if we could catch a redfish. Man, what a beautiful morning, water was slick as glass.

Approx 5 minutes after leaving the dock we were on redfish. The redfish were stacked up like cordwood. Despite being easily spooked we managed to bring these fish to the boat.

Later on we decided to see if we could bring a few trout to the boat. Trout were caught but nothing of size to report.

Time to hit it again tomorrow morning

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Red X Angler
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Nice work guys!
 

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Does water temp affect how the red will fight? Cooler water temps= more or harder fight, warm/hot water= less fight? I've read there is a need to be careful when water and air temps are high as reds can and will overheat so time is critical and revival should be a thorough undertaking to ensure the fish has time to cool back down.
 

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Matt: I don't think temps affect their fight too much, but high water temps generally increase C&R mortality for all fish. Reds are a lot more durable than most, particulrly specks & stripers. That said, keeping the fight short with tackle appropriate to the task & getting the fish released quickly is the key to enhancing their post catch survival. That's particularly true for the big drum later in the summer. If you gotta take a pic, take it quick & get them back in the water. Think how you'd do if you ran a mile race in late Aug and someone stuffed a dry towel over your mouth and nose at the finish line and wouldn't let you breath for 2 or 3 minutes.
 

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Matt: I don't think temps affect their fight too much, but high water temps generally increase C&R mortality for all fish. Reds are a lot more durable than most, particulrly specks & stripers. That said, keeping the fight short with tackle appropriate to the task & getting the fish released quickly is the key to enhancing their post catch survival. That's particularly true for the big drum later in the summer. If you gotta take a pic, take it quick & get them back in the water. Think how you'd do if you ran a mile race in late Aug and someone stuffed a dry towel over your mouth and nose at the finish line and wouldn't let you breath for 2 or 3 minutes.
Very well put sir, and thanks for the quick reply. I hope I have to worry about those big drum later in the summer, I will try to remember to have a camera ready cause of all these guys on here saying "no pic, no fish" lol. I've only caught 2 reds so far, so hard not to want a pic of every one, maybe after I hit double digits, I'll leave the phone in my pocket unless I hook up with a bruiser. Good luck out there.
 

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I don't know enough about the temps-vs-fight other than it is pretty much common knowledge that the cold makes them sluggish. I can only assume they fight less vigorously when caught in cold weather. I can say that the waters I fish vary perhaps 25-30 degrees from spring to full on sweltering summer and I've never taken notice that there was any less of a fight in the warmer water.
I make it a point to photo nearly all my fish just as personal preference. I use a pretty big net because I got it for free and I leave any fish that will not be entering my mouth in the net as I take the photo. I try my best to keep the fish from rubbing against the net material and keep it floating for the most part. If I didn't use the net because I walked away from the kayak to explore parts of a grass island etc then I try to pull the fish onto wet grass and snap the photo and then get it right back ASAP.
That being said I have never had one croak off on me that I didn't want to croak off BUT I can certainly see where heat, sun and general exposure would do one in much quicker.
Many have said that just because a fish is revived and swims away doesn't mean it didn't die from the experience later on. I cannot prove or disprove this claim. To err on the side of caution I'll assume this happens. This is a good reason to not use too little drag and to get the fish to the fisherman in a reasonable fast manner. People might think that horsing a fish in to land it is detrimental. Of course it is but not nearly as detrimental as fighting the fish to exhaustion. I can see where a fish that is belly up upon arrival and then "revived" could perish later on in the day or week or who knows when.
Still in all these are some tough fish and they fight as hard as any others pound for pound. I would hope some of this toughness translates into more fight to live as well???
 
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