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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm working on piecing together a heavier outfit for bass when the water starts to warm up, and it has me thinking about doing a little streamer fishing for trout too. Do any of you streamer guru's have pointers or go-to patterns you don't mind sharing? Will I need a sinking line in order to effectively streamer fish?
 

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Guru, I'm not. But I fish streamers. I've fished them lots for trout and smallmouth. I use floating line but sinking I think would help if you're in larger deeper waters. You can (I think) purchase sections of sinking line to add. Large buggers and slump busters or their larger counterparts: zonkers are great. I like the heavier conehead weights. Are you referring to largemouth of smallmouth in rivers?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Are you referring to largemouth of smallmouth in rivers?
The short answer is "yes" :). I'm mainly picking this one up to throw bushier patters for largemouth, but would also like to toss a few larger patterns in the smallie rivers to see if I can entice some bigger critters.

I'll have to look into the sinking heads. Those will probably agree with my budget much better than a whole new line will.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I'm certain there were, Richard. Don't know if something got lost when the forum was down last night or what.

Any of you guys have experience with the TFO Mini Mag series? I just stumbled on a ready-to-fish outfit on another forum that's just barely within my budget but I can't find a lot of reviews online. It's the smaller of the 2 rods, BTW.
 

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Thanks Jonathan...I feel better. But, Rouse D you have aroused my curiosity...who is Dr. H ?

Mini-mag?... In the years (10 or so) I've carrried TFO, only one person has ever asked me about the mini-mag rods. So...don't think they are very popular. I think they are heavier than most; only 3 piece; and only 8' long.

Within the budget?... consider the TFO limited production rods that usually retail for about $100...just got some more in. Or the Redginton Crosswater outfits that include a case for about $145 in a 6 or 8 wt. And, I've got a new Sci Anglers 8wt rod, 4 pc, 9' that I've priced at $75.
 

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Hmmmm, there were more posts.....some involving jello. A couple of my posts as well as Dylar's are missing. I noticed the forum acting odd last night. It was down?
Yep. I'll try a one post reconstruction of what was covered.

Rod - Go to a shop, let them know what you want to do with the rod, and cast a bunch of models, until you find one you really like. 8wt is probably your most versatile option, but I use a 7wt, and it handles big fish and heavy cover just fine, and turns over good sized flies, as well.

Line - It's rare that you would need a sinking line to fish streamers for trout in the freestone streams we have in NC. Under most conditions, your best streamer setup is going be a floating line, a longer leader (7-9' depending on the stream) and weighted streamers or streamers fished with split shot.

Use a sink tip or full sink line for fishing aggressive cross stream presentations in high, dirty water, or when you're fishing a tailwater. Certain unweighted flies with a built in action on the retrieve (for example, Todd's Wiggle Minnow, seen below) will fish best on a sinking line.



Keep in mind that lines are going to either have a warm water or cold water coating on them. Bass lines, optimized for warm water, are likely to get brittle and crack if used to fish for trout, especially once the water gets into the 40s or lower. Cold water lines will start to get overly stretchy and feel 'noodly' or 'jello-like' if fished extensively in water that is in the 70s or higher.

Flies - Trout are notorious short strikers, so you might want to tie up/invest in some patterns where they hook is in the 'tail' of the fly. The sculpzilla is a personal favorite here.

STRIP SET!!! If you try to set with the rod rather than the line, you're going to be heartbroken.
 

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warm water or cold water coating....brittle and crack
Manufacturers certainly make lines for temperate or cold water conditions and they make line for "tropic" conditions. The only time I have someone asking for a Tropic line is when they are headed to someplace like Florida, Bahamas, Keys, etc. when it is going to be really hot. Even on some of our hot, summer days here...seems like most cold water lines have performed fine. But there are also some lines made for "all conditions...." a wide range of temperatures without becoming too stiff and coiled....or too limp for efficient casting. I see a fair number of old lines that have become somewhat brittle and cracked with age... I haven't experienced any cracking in bass and trout lines used in cold weather or cold water and I haven't had any customers mention that problem. And some of the Tropic lines have not gotten too stiff when used in colder conditions...but some do.

There are certainly plenty of lines on the market and you can see some significant variations in lines even within the same brand. Someone traveling to a range of climates and locations would be wise to study the variation in lines and the companies descriptions of lines being considered.
 

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I've encountered the 'jello' effect in cold water lines from both Rio and SA lines when fishing the French Broad and Swannanoa rivers for summer smallmouth (water temps low-mid 70s), and I've developed a real fondness for Streamer Express sinking lines precisely because they were designed with big water trout fishing in mind, and hold up to the cold of winter trout streams and tailwaters without cracking, in contrast to Rio's sinking offerings which are "general purpose" lines (and which cracked quickly under winter conditions). I suspect many people fishing with cold water lines in warm water don't even realize what's really happening, because it isn't visually obvious in the way that cracking or peeling would be.
 

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I'd pretty much echo what Dyler said. I've just started getting into streamer fishing myself. This next year I'm actually throwing an 8wt with intermediate line. The rod is labeled 8wt but I'd really call it a 7.5. It makes casting the big 4inch flies easier. I mainly use floating line but don't like how the fly doesn't stay down for as long as I'd like. I think intermediate line will remedy this. I also don't use a very long leader. Mainly because I found with long leaders the fish will strike and spit the fly before I can set the hook. My retrieve is very jerky and I feel some slack and then a fast strip makes the fly move in a erratic motion that attracts fish. I've had big fish follow a fly several times in a row.
 

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I'd pretty much echo what Dyler said. I've just started getting into streamer fishing myself. This next year I'm actually throwing an 8wt with intermediate line. The rod is labeled 8wt but I'd really call it a 7.5. It makes casting the big 4inch flies easier. I mainly use floating line but don't like how the fly doesn't stay down for as long as I'd like. I think intermediate line will remedy this. I also don't use a very long leader. Mainly because I found with long leaders the fish will strike and spit the fly before I can set the hook. My retrieve is very jerky and I feel some slack and then a fast strip makes the fly move in a erratic motion that attracts fish. I've had big fish follow a fly several times in a row.
In general, when I'm fishing with a long leader I'm not doing much in the way of a retrieve. The technique is a lot closer to tight line nymphing with occasional twitches. When I'm fishing the fly really aggressively, I don't think it matters that much how deep the fly gets. The fish that come after an aggressively worked streamer will come up to get it if they need to. I've had fish come off the bottom in 8-10 feet of water to slam a streamer 18-24" below the surface. When I do intend to work it hard and cross stream, I usually do shorten the leader considerably.
 

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In general, when I'm fishing with a long leader I'm not doing much in the way of a retrieve. The technique is a lot closer to tight line nymphing with occasional twitches. .
^^This. You beat me to it. I do a lot of drifting streamers exactly like nymphs/midges. Long leader helps to get down to where the fish are without much drag from the fly line that would hinder the fly getting down quicker.



Sent from my kayak...
 

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Streamer express is the way to go. Generally on our freestone streams streamers are most effective in high water. That weighted line really helps in the larger streams. Not much compares to stripping a circus peanut through a deep off color hole and have a monster brown thump it. For smaller streams sinking line isn't needed. But sinking line casts much easier than a heavily weighted streamer with all the weight close to the fly.
 
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