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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Began fishing at 6:15 this morning and scored a couple rainbows and a truck load of chubs and sunnies....When finished fishing the stretch I had came to cover I broke for lunch and off to another area I went.....

I intended originally on annihilating the native trout in a "secret" stretch of water but the fish had other things in mind so after a period of poking around aimlessly I headed back to the truck....

Things got interesting very quickly when I happened upon the pictured timber rattler. I had just topped a small hill on a trail and looked up to see a vehicle passing down the road so I had taken my eyes off the trail. Fortunately, the snake caught my eye when I was around 5 ft from it......I literally expected to see myself standing beside me. I felt like my soul had jumped out of my body. The rattle of that thing might haunt my dreams tonight.....

Sooooo, it was a great day and I encountered my first rattler in the wild.

Good fishing!

P.S. There were some folks downriver of me when I reached my truck and I thoughtfully informed them of the snake because of the young children they had with them. Thinking I had performed a good deed I packed my gear and headed out only to see those fools WITH THEIR KIDS down that trail prodding at the snake with a stick. I had to grit my teeth and keep trucking. Really ticked me off....absolute genius.






















Sent from my kayak...
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
You do know that a snake can reach out 2/3rd's of it's body length while coiled and reach up and grab a hold...do you not?
Yes sir. I know that. I'm glad the snake wasn't trying to "show off" or might've tagged me....

I thought canebrakes which that one is were a differant species fromtimbers? They get much bigger if I remember.
Something similar to fish nicknames varying from region to region I assume. Both names refer to the timber rattler though.



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They are a different species. The canebrake does not have any yellow hue in it. The pictured snake is a timber rattler.
I was under the assumption that the solid black tail marked a canebreak. Heck western diamondbacks are all I had to worry about in idaho and montana has NO venomous snake indeginous! You crazy rebs and your killer stuff!
 

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Both have the black tail. I just did a google search to verify my understanding and both have the same scientific name but it states the differences. Canebrakes are also only in the Coastal Planes region.

Eta: I just googled this and now know less than I thought I did. You be the judge. One site says they are different and the other says they aren't. http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/gaston/Pests/reptiles/canebrake.htm http://www.dgif.virginia.gov/wildlife/information/?s=030013
The second link provided by you states: "It is listed as state endangered". If it crosses my path it will definitely be "Endangered"!!!
 

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[QUOTE Still ticks me off about those people going up the trail and fooling with it though.....[/QUOTE] well, it's that kind of stupidity that keep human's gene pool stronger.. LOL...
 
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