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Red X Angler
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more gimmick than anything. A very light cheap reel that fits the long noodle poles people use for spider rigging crappie.
 

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I prefer a baitcasting reel for my long jigging and spider rigging rods. It's a lot easier letting out line that with a spinning reel. They are also a lot more comfortable to jig with than a spinning reel. I use the cheap $25-$30 reels. Since you aren't casting it isn't a big deal to have a good braking system so it's not hard to get by with the cheap reels.
 

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I think those reels are designed mostly for tight lining or trolling with the long rods where you are dropping straight down or letting line out behind the boat. I cant see casting small jigs with anything but a spinning reel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yeah I can see the advantages for letting down small jigs. Although I'm not sure I can see the advantages of a 10 or 11 foot rod from a kayak. I was using a 5 foot ultralight yesterday and its easy to reach up and grab the line pull or break the jig off if you get hung up.
 

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Trolling for crappie is the spiderlineing deal you use long rods and step it down in leanth each set. You can see guys with 10-15 rods out. Bait casting rods are better and it's a panfish so brake and drag are no issue
 

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We used to run 12 off the front and 12 off the back on Kentucky and Barkley Lakes.....The long rods are a pain in the kayak. I did do a little spider rigging from the yak last spring. I used my 8 foot jigging rods instead of my usual 12-14 foot rods. Wasn't as bad but still a pain. I'll only fish that way from the boat from now on. The kayak will be for the couple of places my boat can't get to. Let me rephrase that, the places I run the risk of getting stuck if I get in and the water rises. Had a very near miss last year...
 

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I was with Trigger for that "near miss"...caught a boatload of crappie but almost didn't make back under the bridge. We should have kept more fish to help weight down his boat! For crappie fishing locally (along the coastal plain), a good 5 1/5' to 6' ultralite spinning outfit loaded with 4-6# mono is all you'll need to throw tiny tubes, beetle spins, jigs, and small live baits under a small float. Those long poles and small baitcast reels you pictured are a better application for inland lakes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I'm not really interested in spider rigging. Too much structure in the creeks in the eastern part of the state for it to be effective imo. If the crappie stay in the places they were yesterday I'm goin to have a lot of fun for next 4 months or so. Tho I can imagine they will get tougher to catch when the water temp drops to the low 40s....
 

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I could see the long rods being an advantage as you can hang your baits straight down in a fairly shallow brush pile without getting the boat close enough to spook the fish. Also spread out across the front or back of the boat, your spread can cover more water.
 

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I fish for crappie from the banks and just use light Abu Garcia combos I picked up at dicks for 30$ plus a 10$ rebate on each so a good deal. Plus they are nice UL rods and reels for some small pond basing. My previous crappie setups were Zebco 303 combos I think they were like 12$ each from Walmart.
 
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