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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
got a tracker aluminum boat and in the process of replacing deck and adding deck/compartments.

what is used to seal the plywood and where can you get it? not looking anything $50/gal.

also, am going to add padding between the carpet and wood, anyone have a good suggestion for a closed cell foam type material that doesn't compress flat horribly?
 

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A coating of primer such as kilz and some paint would probably be a pretty inexpensive option. Alot of bass boats these days have padding under the carpet on the front deck, places that sell marine carpet might have something. If not you may be able to use the rubber antifatigue mats under the carpet.
 

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Red X Angler
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I mop mine down with rustoleum, or any "deal" I get on porch/barn paint or other exterior oil based paints. Be sure to wet down the edges really well. I mop it on thick with a wide paint brush and it seems to hold up pretty well for me although I haven't really kept anything Ive done that too more than 5 yrs but also the boats I've used it on are seldom out of the weather too. It is definitely not the "right" way or the right materials but it works good enough for what I do. You want to make sure your wood is good and dry and paint it well all over on both sides and all edges a few coats. Don't know about the padding, never used any. I prefer to use a non skid paint topcoat or boat carpet that can breathe so it doesn't hold moisture against the wood.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Main reason for the pad is because I can't stand on plywood all day, it kills me. Think I will coat something like y'all suggest, paint like. I'm ok doing again in 5, as it's a beater boat.
 

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Red X Angler
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you could use one of those workers fatigue mats like you stand on in factories. Maybe buy one big enough to cut to fit and roll it up when hauling?
 

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If you want it to last the ONLY thing to use is a marine epoxy.
The way I replace decks. 2 coats all surfaces including the edges.
The floor will outlast the boat hull.

I can tell you this with complete certainty.
Paint is not water proof....not even close.
Your wood treatment products are not water proof. Not even close.
Polyester resin is not water proof. Not even close.
Vinylester resin is not water proof. Not even close.
Polyurethane is not water proof. Not even close.
You see the pattern here? These are all relatively inexpensive products.....That don't work!

And now I'm going to rock the world with this next statement.
Marine plywood is not treated with anything to make it resistant to rot. In fact some of the best marine plywoods are made from woods that aren't very rot resistant species. It's more about how the plywood is made, the glue, and to what standard it's made.
And another statement that may rock some back on their heels. Fiberglassing something is not waterproofing. Fiberglass cloth aint a water proofer, it protects from physical damage and adds strength to structure.

Boat soles (floors) typically rot out from the bottom up, not the top down.
Carpets, rubber matting, faux flooring, and improper storage all lead to constant moisture and trapped moisture.
The wood gets into a situation where it never dries. It may appear dry from the top side but it's not.
It's why most times if you have soft spots in a sole, more than likely you have stringer and transom damage as well.
If you got foam below the sole and a rotted sole.....your foam is shot as well. Please don't use foam in a can. There are insulation foams and there are flotation foams. Unfortunately flotation foams are, you guessed it, EXPENSIVE.

The epoxy is the only way to go. You can get a 3 gallon kit for around 150-180
Well worth the penny.

The key is encapsulation. You are creating a 99% water impermeable barrier. If you were going to drill a 1/2" hole in the barrier, you would first drill a 3/4" hole, fill it with thickened epoxy and then drill your 1/2" hole through that cured epoxy plug.
Your sole, transom, stringer...whatever will literally last forever given the right product and care .

So Jarrett Bay down in Beaufort makes one of the world's top sportfish boats......out of plywood.
Always use the right product for the application and there will be no problems.
 

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Red X Angler
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DR is right, he knows the proper way to do this and that would be a long term fix and if you can spare the extra cash now its the best way to go.
 

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There is this big thing called false economy.
I do the same job my way and spend 400 in materials and 20 hours in labor. One time deal.

You go the cheap route and you do it 2 or 3 times over the course of ownership, spend 1500 in materials, and 200 hours in labor.

I don't know about yall but my time is at minimal worth a shop rate of 50 dollars an hour. It's time away from family, fishing, or doing something else I may need to do or want to do. Always include your labor in your cost. Your time has value .

Pay me now or pay me triple later.
 

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Red X Angler
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I fix cheap for 2 reasons. I either cannot do it right now and do it any other way (better to have it work for now than do without) or I have no plans on keeping it and do not see any value in the investment to do it right. Otherwise, the "proper" was is always the best investment. I don't really keep up with my labor unless it's a resale item I am working on, then to me it has real value.
 

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Red X Angler
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Yeah but why do $1500 worth of repairs to a $1500 boat is usually my situation..

I fix the right way because....
It's easier to sell a Cadillac than a piece of hammered ****.
 

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Some things are better left unfixed unless it carries more sentimental value than worth.

The thing is, when you fix them the right way you know where the manufacturers are really sticking it to the consumer.
To do a project like this the right way just stop and look at the difference in material.
His budget is 80 dollars on something to put on the wood. I'm buying 3 gallons of marinepoxy for around 175.00.

So we're talking roughly a 100 bucks more in the material.
If a 100 bucks is a bank breaker, the last thing you need to be worrying about is a boat.
 
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