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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm going to take the easy way out on this. Right now I don't have access to a digital camera but a Texas coast sharker has done an excellent job of publishing a step by step set of instructions along with great pictures of how to accomplish the job at hand. Basically we are talking about an oversize surf weight or a grapple hook with #6 copper wire hooks. I got the idea while trying to come up with a better anchor design for coastal kayaking. Kayaks being small and relatively easy to swamp or flip require an anchor that will hold the yak in place in a pretty strong current but break free if the a large clump of grass or etc catches on the anchor line and threatens to swamp or flip the boat. Thats the last thing you want to happen in a strong current such as you might find in an inlet or channel between two large bodies of water. Also a major problem is snagging an anchor on an oyster bed or worse a rock or shipwreck of the beach. I feel this design is the best and safest anchor for swift water applications. You can scrounge the materials or buy them: your choice.
Materials needed: 11/4 lbs of lead, 6" of 1" copper pipe, 1 1" copper pipe cap, and 3' of #6 copper wire. You will also need a way to melt your lead and possibly a fan to carry away any lead fumes. A gas or propane grill or stove or a propane fish cooker will take care of the heat requirements. Paracute cord is the handiest anchor line. anything larger would require a larger anchor and defeat the purpose. Two warnings: make sure everything is dry inside and out because if it isn't you are liable to be wearing molten lead. Moisture will cause a dangerouse steam explosion. #2. don't breathe in the fumes as lead fumes are poisonus and accumulate in the body. LONG sleeves, long pants, heavy leather gloves and eye protection should be worn while working with lead. Now for the how too segment. I send you to Texas Shark Fishing with just a click. (Just too easy)
http://groups.msn.com/TEXASSHARKFISHING/makingsurfweights.msnw
Thanks to NC Angler's FOJOLOY AND PTORRES for their help in testing and critique of this anchor. wires used for prongs were 16" long w/ 6'' extending below cap. finished wt. is 11/2 lbs AL
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Now that we have pictures and instrutions I have suggestion for those who would like to have that type of anchor but don't want to fool with melting lead. you could accompolish this a little easier also. Use plastic pipe ...10 " of 1" pipe or an 8"x 11/4" plastic tailpiece from a lavatory or kitchen sink. Pour the pipe Full of concrete after making sure the wires won't get pushed down. Allow plenty of cure time as the pipe will reain moisture, AL
 
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