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Red X Angler
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You will find sand in that truck 6 months after being on the beach. It just keeps appearing. But as long as you do an undercarriage wash as well as exterior you should be fine. The only way I wouldn't do it is if I had those high dollar chrome rims.....
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Ok, any tips on how to drive on the beach and what not to do. Ill be buying the beach pass on Sept 15th. I know the basics but I'm not use to driving on sand. I'm more used to mud. Do I really need to lower my PSI every time I get on the beach? I've rode with friends on the beach but never actually drove myself. Any tips are appreciated.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
So I'm just picturing the worst case scenario. If I get stuck on the wrong part of the beach, I'm pretty much screwed unless I can get it out before the tide comes in. So should I not risk it and lower my psi every single time? I don't like to take risk, if I can prevent something, I would like to. Also what's a good PSI for the beach?
 

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Exactly why I stay off the firm stuff right down by the water.
Salt spray will still get it. Fished Hatteras by vehicle for thirty five years until they closed most the beach to ORV. No way to avoid it. When the spray didn't get it, it seemed like at least once during the weeks stay the Pamlico would flood HWY 12 and would have to run through it to get back to the house.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The salt can't be worse then the salt they put on the roads during the winter. I'm more worried about my rotors, brakes, and undercarriage getting sand all in it. I guess it's the price you pay to be able to fish from the beach. I didn't buy a 4x4 truck to just let it sit in the driveway.
 

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I'm assuming by your avatar and the fact your buying a pass on Sept 15th you are talking about driving the beach of Emerald Isle. I have been driving that beach for at least 10 years and may have lowered my tire pressure once. On the Outer Banks I wouldnt consider driving on the beach without lowering it to about 20psi. The sand up there is a good bit looser then it is down here. However since you havent got a lot of experience it may be a good idea to lower them the first few times to get a feel of the beach and determine from there if you need to keep lowering your PSI. As for what are of the beach to drive on, down towards the water vs the high side where it's usually dry, you shouldnt encounter any problems on towards the water during a low tide on the hardened sand. That's not without exception though and I have seen some sand by the point that was almost quicksand and people in trouble that way. My best advice for that is to look for tracks from someone before you and you can usually guage how the sand is packed by how deep tracks dig on it. When driving in the softer sand make sure try to avoid any quick stops and just gradually slow down w/ your wheels straight. That will make it easier for you to stay on top and not dig when you start back up.
 

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Red X Angler
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I've driven beaches without lowering air pressure but I usually do lower it to around 18 psi. Not a big deal to air back up when you come off and the bigger footprint gives you a smoother ride I think. If you're staying close by you need not air up at all until you go home. The places you are likely to get stuck are the access points. Stay above the high tide line if you can and travel in the tracks of others. Steady and easy in 4 High is the ticket. A short handled shovel, piece of carpet and a chain or cable is a good idea to have in the truck just in case. Drive the beach for a day and you will be comfortable doing so...
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I'm assuming by your avatar and the fact your buying a pass on Sept 15th you are talking about driving the beach of Emerald Isle. I have been driving that beach for at least 10 years and may have lowered my tire pressure once. On the Outer Banks I wouldnt consider driving on the beach without lowering it to about 20psi. The sand up there is a good bit looser then it is down here. However since you havent got a lot of experience it may be a good idea to lower them the first few times to get a feel of the beach and determine from there if you need to keep lowering your PSI. As for what are of the beach to drive on, down towards the water vs the high side where it's usually dry, you shouldnt encounter any problems on towards the water during a low tide on the hardened sand. That's not without exception though and I have seen some sand by the point that was almost quicksand and people in trouble that way. My best advice for that is to look for tracks from someone before you and you can usually guage how the sand is packed by how deep tracks dig on it. When driving in the softer sand make sure try to avoid any quick stops and just gradually slow down w/ your wheels straight. That will make it easier for you to stay on top and not dig when you start back up.
Good info!!! Thanks! The reason why asked about PSI is because I noticed when I went to Nag Head we always lowered the psi. When I rode with my buddy in EI, we never did anything. So what you said makes a lot of sense. Ill lower it the first couple of times out but I'm glad I don't have to do that every time!
 

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I'd lower your PSI every time even if you don't think you'll get stuck. I notice my engine runs alot cooler and at lower RPMs when I air down. I drive on Fort Fisher though and I think the sand there is worse than alot of places. But driving a brand new truck...I'd air down every time regardless.
 

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Sand on Bogue Banks is packed pretty hard due to all the beach reclamation projects. Sometimes it's like concrete. When you are driving up the ramp to the street is when you may encounter problems. Nice deep ruts in the soft stuff back there.
Gordon is absolutely correct about this, especially as the season goes on. The trickiest part of beach driving can be getting on and off the beach. You pretty much need to not let off the gas at this stage all the while keeping an eye open for someone coming the other direction since the accesses are only wide enough for one way traffic.
 

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Red X Angler
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Black skimmer is the worst ramp, its steep and gets torn up in the sand pretty good and the sand is soft down to BIP. At the point the sand get bad sometimes around the ramp. Remember when coming onto the beach those off going at the ramp have the right of way so back up please..as I said sand is soft and hard for some to stop and get going. I carry a shovel. I have tow pulled and jump started and even brought ambulance people to help a medical emergency on the beach. Oh and carry a tow rope. Ive been lucky enough Ive never been stuck but help dozens of people every year. If you wish ill give you the number to the one tow truck guy that will come on the beach and get you for $250. Im in a tan ford f150 pole holder on the front and a mounted cutting board on my tail gat, stop and say hi!! Have fun and well worth the $100 and by the way they have the stickers already.. Have fun be safe and good luck!!
 

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OEM tires, right? Not the best for sand. Take it slow. If I cannot talk you out of it, at least take 10" wide boards. Take a buddy with a strong back and make sure he has goggles to protect his eyes from sand thrown by spinning wheels. Turning presents a unique problem so do it slow with a big turning radius. If the front tires begin plowing instead of rolling, straighten them, don't turn them more sharply and don't try sliding the rear around by emergency brake or by brake torque-ing. Consider the disk brakes for a minute. Sand WILL get between the brake pads and the rotors. Sand is the enemy. Please don't.
 

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Hey man if it is a GM turn the traction control off so you can actually have control of your accelerator in the event of wheel slip. With it on it cuts power at the first sign of slippage and sounds terrible.

Only thing I can offer.

Sent from my XT1080
 
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