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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Finally got my son to join me for a morning on the water Saturday...was the first time since March I could get him off a surfboard. Hit the water at 530 and were throwing topwater by 545. Worked an area for about 30 minutes and missed a couple lazy bites then found a small school of big reds pushing in front. Son gets one to take and boats a nice 25" fish. The fish had scattered when he hooked up so we power poled down to let them settle. Well low and behold we had watched a couple of kayakers coming down the ICW towards us for a few minutes, the yaks make the turn and peddle/paddle right through our area about 50' off my starboard side. Sorry to say, my son is a bit more calm than I am and I put the spook jr right between the two yaks and about 20' past them to show them how rude they were. We never saw those fish again. I go out of my way to make sure I am courteous to the yaks and will continue to do so for their safety but ****, if your gonna paddle a mile and more to a spot...what is another couple hundred feet? Had my son not been with me I am positive there would have been an awesome exchange of after 11pm cable english. End of rant.

As for an actual fishing report...the very high tides with a very low coefficient, along with the influx of so much fresh water from recent rains have moved the fish and made for a tough bite. We finished with 2 slot fish and a couple of rats on Saturday, back at the house by 830...Tried a different area this morning that usually holds some fish when the water stays in there for several days to similar results...1 mid slot red, 3 rats and two keeper flounder.
 

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Yaks, cars on the highway, shoppers at Walmart, it is all about ME and never mind about other people.
Sorry you and your son had to have this experience. I had the equal experience coming home from Wake Forest yesterday.
Just seems all to common these days and it really does not matter whether you are fishing, driving a car, walking in the mall, ...
I do blame the parents of my generation, being 57, that we (general term) have raised out kids that they are "entitled".
Again, I am sorry this happen to you and it is all too common these days, that vacuums!
 

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Last week I was on a friends boat enjoying the topwater bite when and old man (and what we assume was his wife) proceeded to set his gill net directly across our trolling path after waiting about 5 minutes to see what we were doing. My friend was only able to hold his tongue because he saw what appeared to be a granddaughter on the boat as well. I'm still not sure why my boy didn't jump on plane and buzz the length of the net.

Some people just don't care.
 

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Glad you were able to hold your tongue. I had an incident at High Rock ramp a few weeks ago where I was unable to, and the kids of the people involved may have learned some new words. I almost made it out without saying anything, but then someone on the other boat said something to me and it was on. I would like to take this chance to remind people that the ramp and dock area is not the place to load up the coolers, dogs and cats, grandma and grandpa, and whatever else you bring to the lake. Get in or out, and get out of the way. Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Have had the boat ramp melt down too...with my wife sitting in the boat waiting to launch...and have watched several others fall prey to the aggravation that can be a public ramp. Fulchers Landing in Sneads Ferry is one of my favorite places to watch all of the things you should not do at a public ramp.

These two yaks were specifically heading to their fishing spot, and yes, after giving up on the fish we had been on and since they had positioned up between me and my #2 spot for the morning...I definitely had visions of a drive by at 55mph. And so the teacher became the student and my 20 year old sons even keel won. The look on the trailing yaks face when he heard the "swoosh" of my cast and realized my rod was pointed his way and then watched the spook fly past his bow...
 

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Ok, let me treat this as a learning opportunity.... I don't know the correct behavior here. Not being difficult, but unlike many of you, I didn't grow up on the water, and I have no mentor to explain the unwritten rules to me.

You were anchored, and not actively fishing, from what I read. The kayaks passed about 50' away from an anchored boat with no rods out. They can't read your mind and know that you were waiting for a school of fish to return. For all they know, you were stopped to have breakfast. They were passing through, you were anchored and not actively fishing. If they would have stopped to fish the spot, different issue... but just passing an anchored boat that's not fishing.... I don't see a problem.

And why is that worse wrong than your behavior of throwing a potentially maiming weapon (a hit with it could have led to a charge of assault), or the advice of trying to intentionally sink or swamp another vessel?
 

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Ok, let me treat this as a learning opportunity.... I don't know the correct behavior here. Not being difficult, but unlike many of you, I didn't grow up on the water, and I have no mentor to explain the unwritten rules to me.

You were anchored, and not actively fishing, from what I read. ]
I would assume anyone with power poles out is actively fishing...

I think that the cast was probably the perfectly appropriate amount of escalation. It sent a non aggressive message without escalating the situation. The yakkers probably thought "dangit and oops." And you weren't the jerk in a power boat, you were the guy fishing down the ICW.
 

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Glad you were able to hold your tongue. I had an incident at High Rock ramp a few weeks ago where I was unable to, and the kids of the people involved may have learned some new words. I almost made it out without saying anything, but then someone on the other boat said something to me and it was on. I would like to take this chance to remind people that the ramp and dock area is not the place to load up the coolers, dogs and cats, grandma and grandpa, and whatever else you bring to the lake. Get in or out, and get out of the way. Thanks.
Expecting this etiquette at High Rock is probably a reach!
 

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I would assume anyone with power poles out is actively fishing...

I think that the cast was probably the perfectly appropriate amount of escalation. It sent a non aggressive message without escalating the situation. The yakkers probably thought "dangit and oops." And you weren't the jerk in a power boat, you were the guy fishing down the ICW.
Nobody is being called a jerk here....

I wouldn't make that assumption about the power pole. I don't know enough about boats to think that a power pole is used more or less from fishermen or people anchored for sunbathing. An anchored boat is an anchored boat. Again, you're asking the kayaker to read the mind of the guy anchored up. The tool he uses to anchor is irrelevant to me.

As I approached the boat (the mere fact that I'm approaching it in a kayak means it is likely anchored), I would look for fishing rods out to ensure that I passed the boat on the side away from the rods, but if I saw no rods out, I would not assume they were fishing that area. I'd say maybe 1/3 of the anchored boats I encounter are fishing, the rest are sunbathing, eating, drinking, or just relaxing on the water. In fact, I would be more likely to pass between the boat and the shore with the theory that the boat is likely to decide to power up and move on while I'm passing it, and I don't want to be between it and the main channel.

And I don't think casting a heavy lure with a pair of treble hooks intentionally at someone (within 20 feet is at someone) is ever called for. I'm sure that anyone who thinks it's OK would not be OK with someone throwing knives or even rocks between them and their traveling companion.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
We were not directly on the ICW rather on a flat adjacent to it...all alone. So we were "anchored" but both actively casting the area. Never thought about the possible assault charge but that would be classic to stand in court and face charges for, fortunately I have confidence in my casting abilities. I did not say what they did was worse than my reaction...rather that my son is apparently a better person than me. If you would like to use this as a learning moment...always give space to someone that even appears to be fishing (especially in calm skinny waters, reds are notoriously spooky...we don't fish for them in this setting, we stalk them and if you ever see anyone poling their boat...give them even more space) unless you are in a restricted area (i.e. people tied up to bridge pilings, narrow creek, etc..) also realize that when you are in a kayak in skinny water, most boats cannot come off plane to slow down for you so brace yourself, and make yourself visible if you are in a creek that has many bends and boats are actively moving up/down...just about took a yak out one afternoon that was below the grass line-behind a bend and scared the heck out of him/me...raise your rod or stand up if you hear someone coming.

The rising popularity of kayaks is understandable but much of this is "common" sense/courtesy as Fuquay fisherman mentions, not unwritten rules...and it is unfortunately, as someone else pointed out, a losing battle in todays world.
 

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Ok, that's a little different than the situation you described initially. If you were fishing an area, then it's yours, and definitely nobody should approach you. The situation as I understood it was quite different, which was you were just parked and waiting.

I realize the plane issue, ... I have the most visible kayak (lime green) it is possible to have, and I fly a flag when I fish coastal areas, as the tall grass can hide me, and I'll turn bow on to your wake so that it doesn't swamp me. You can't eliminate stupid though, and too many people think it's still 30 years ago when nobody but other big noisy boats were on the water, so they go WOT through skinny water where they can not see far enough to stop in time. While it's a very dangerous situation, if you're going too fast to stop if there is a person or a log around the next bend, you're going too fast.

And, oh yeah, casting that close to someone is definitely over the line. If you hit them (and who's to say a wave or wind gust won't throw your aim off), it's definitely assault.
 
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I think the best thing to walk away from the topic at hand is as my son's favorite tv show states (Daniel the Tiger), "if you feel so mad that you want to roar, take a deep breath and count to four..." I'm glad to know that you are the type of person who raised your son with integrity and that you are humble enough to admit publicly that he taught you that day. I'd go fishing with any lot of you cause you all seem to be "men" in the best sense of the word despite the moments that we may not be the most proud of. This reminds me of Proverbs 15:1, a soft answer turns away wrath...

- James -
 

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I think it really boils down to common sense and common courtesy. Kayak or boat, if you're fishing then you should follow the rules, both written and unwritten, IMO. But not everyone is out to ruin your fishing spot or stick it to you on the water, mistakes will be made..

I fish from a 19-foot skiff, and a 14-foot cuda yak, so I see both sides..

That said, a kayak is at a much greater disadvantage on the water in terms of reaction time, like it or not. Gotta be a defensive paddler to avoid getting run over it seems like. Can sort of be compared to bicyclists on the roadway. (not sure of the road laws with cyclists, I'm not one)

I understand it isn't that hard to tell if someone is fishing an area, and you do need to give them their space...but I gotta say, if somebody ever purposefully threw a treble-hooked lure at me while in my yak on the water, we'd have a big problem lol.

I've had people in kayaks and reg boats cross over my fishing "spot" in the creeks and waterway and more often than not they're usually "noobs" to the sport, like most of us were at one point.

Seems to me the better option would be to take the opportunity to inform them of the right etiquette, as opposed to escalating the situation by chucking a lure at them to send a "message."
 

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I hate feeling crowded when I'm fishing, but I completely understand being frustrated with kayakers. People like to feel entitled like they own the water. Watched some yankees with rented yak's and paddle boards at topsail yesterday paddle out to the middle of the ICW and proceed to just float and drift right down the middle,right between all the boats going by on plane. Luckily for them the boats had the common sense to slow down so as not to kill them, but it struck me as a jerk move to stop all the ICW traffic so you can enjoy your leisurely float. People don't realize that the ICW is a highway, not a swimming pool.

I will say that as a kayaker, sometimes you have to upset people for the simple reason that it isn't usually safe to venture away from the bank to pass someone as you would do in a boat. The only option it to quickly and quietly scoot along the bank and apologize for the inconvenience to the boats beating the banks.
 

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From how you described it I imagine the people had no idea of proper etiquette. I'm sure if you informed them that it's for safety reasons they keep their distance they would have understood. I think they'd understand that more than you casting right next to them. If someone did that to me, I'd think it was the person casting at me that didn't understand safety not myself.
 

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I always try to be cognizant and considerate of others while fishing, from either boat or kayak, but sometimes an intrusion is unavoidable. I was recently kayak fishing some grass islands near the Lockwood Folly. I was headed back to the boat ramp and had to go down a deep water canal with land on one side, and shallow flats/oyster rock on the other. There was a guy fishing from his pier, casting a line. He reeled in his line, but I almost ran other two other lines he had out that I couldn't see until the last second. He never said a word about them. I back away and had to go around scraping my way through the oyster rock to avoid his lines. I probably ticked him off in coming so close, but I had no other path to paddle, and a word of warning about the other two lines would have been helpful.

By the way, where can I get one of those "eddie kits" for my kayak?
 
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