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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok yesterday I borrowed a friends ocean kayak ( glad water is warm ) and headed out onto lake lynn to give it a try. Just took one light action rod with wacky rigged senko on it since this is a recreational kayak no rod holders etc. The wind was up a little so I first moved into a cove so I could get the hang of maneuvering and fishing. After abut 10 minutes had first bass on. I wasn't sure at first since I was still drifting a little but got it to the boat.

However that was the ONLY one I got to the boat. I had about 7 other real good bites however each time seemed like the line would slack and I could never catch up since fish were running toward me, usually when I finally went to set the hook the fish was under or near the kayak and when I ripped they came off.

I have great hook set success on plastics from the bank was just wondering if there is something different like pulling to the side versus up when sitting in the kayak?

I fished for 2 hours kinda enjoyed it and surprisingly not killing my back this morning, but I would need to buy a proper kayak, seat and some good towing way to haul it to the lake and back each time.
 

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Do you take a big step back as you set the hook bank fishing? Can't do that in a yak. Keep you rod tip low so that raising it will take up more slack.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Nope don't take a big step back like ya see all these videos of people doing. Just either try to catch up slack or wait till line tenses than just rip. The drifting even so slightly seemd to be the key factor. Will try keeping tip lower next time I give it a try.
 

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You do also need to be aware of the drift and reel to compensate when necessary. If there is enough of a breeze so I am constantly getting pushed in one direction or another, I either anchor or pick a line to get pushed along that is easy to deal with.
 

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One thing that helps me if I'm going at faster speeds, and I'm a good distance from shore is actually have my kayak backwards and just back paddling. That way my line is always tight. To keep from going too fast I pretty much just bump it off the bottom and real in the slack with my worms. It works well for you buzz baits too, and all you have to do is just slightly slow your retrieve. It just doesn't work in tighter areas when you're near the bank since your kayak will go over the area before your bait...you'll probably be scaring them off.
 

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One thing that's different about fishing in a yak is that when you make that initial hookset, if it's a decent fish you'll be pulling yourself toward it. Not like on the bank. Set the hook normally and take in the line quickly enough to keep it taught during the entire battle.
 

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One thing that's different about fishing in a yak is that when you make that initial hookset, if it's a decent fish you'll be pulling yourself toward it. Not like on the bank. Set the hook normally and take in the line quickly enough to keep it taught during the entire battle.
The guys who do mothership trips for big billfish have a really tough time with that. I have noticed it a few times when I would find a place to "park" up against a rock or something at Harris (always seems to be windy, so sometimes I will back in between a couple of rocks on a point); setting the hook on a bass or catfish will pull me free from my spot.
 

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Take a trick from the folks that fish powerboats off shore and use a drift bag,or bucket in my case. I went to the paint store and got a couple of 1 gallon paint buckets. I took the bails off,drilled a couple of holes in the side and ran a small length of rope to make another bail/handle. I attached 6 feet of line to the bucket and I clip it to my anchor trolly. I adjust it to the direction of the wind and the bucket slows me WAY down and allows for slower drifts,and since you're drifting slower, a better hook set.
 

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spidey,

I my experience fish will more often than not move toward deeper water when they take a soft bait. So, yes, it is different in how to get a good hook set. Take line up until you feel the fish, then set quick as opposed to hard. You'll hook more fish securely like this, but I still like to reel until the drag slips, then play the fish normally.

Fishscalz
 
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