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I wanted to start a thread to share ideas on taking good fish photos. I really enjoy looking at everyone's photos and would like to improve my own pictures. Here's what I've noticed makes a good photo.

1. Subject in full sun.
2. Fish look best just after being caught.
3. A smiling face is nice! (I mean the angler, not the fish!)
4. Crop out unnecessary details (either by zooming-in or editing later).

Of course, point 3 is a challenge when fishing solo. Other suggestions?
 

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I'm no photographer and I use junk digital cameras, but here's a couple of things I've noticed from taking digital kayak fishing photos:

Dave B prefers NOT to see kayak angler's toes - I've been been trying to keep them out of the frame at his request. I've also taken several pics of fish on the floor of the kayak, which is right between the thighs - not really the most appealing photo to share.

I find the zoom on low-end digital cameras to be a negative. Makes the camera too susceptible to shake/blur unless you're firmly mounted on a tripod. Definitely try to keep within the optical zoom range.

Taking highest-res photos eats more storage on the camera but makes better grade material for cropping when you get back to the computer.

When solo, I've been using a fish gripper to get the fish a little farther away from me and get more of my arm out of the frame.
 

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Self-pics from the yak are indeed a challenge. The biggest thing I've learned, though, as Jeff mentioned, is that megapixels are better friends than zoom. Megapixels turn into zoom when you start cropping your pics -- I'll make that trade every time.

Some of the yak-fishin' guys will build a mount and use the camera's shutter timer to take the shot. Shooting over your shoulder is one popular shot, shooting back toward the cockpit from the nose of the boat is another... One guy I saw recently had an 8' arm along one side of his boat, he'd swing the arm out, let it take the shot, then reach out with his paddle and pull the arm back in. Took some real nice pics, from a real good angle...

One thing I struggle with is turning the fish so the good-lookin' side is toward the camera... It always seems to turn bottom-side up at just the wrong moment...
 

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Dont forget the "hold it out at arms length but bend your elbows just enough and get just the right angle, and wear your hat just a bit high and forward to make the fish look as big as possible" technique...LOL!!!!
 
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Dont forget the "hold it out at arms length but bend your elbows just enough and get just the right angle, and wear your hat just a bit high and forward to make the fish look as big as possible" technique...LOL!!!!
Or if your catch is small--Go next door and get the big ones out of your neighbor's cooler for picture taking.:D
 

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Hold the bass so they are curved a bit like the shape of a bow, something about making them look bigger.

I heard this and try to do it when I remember to:
I try not to make the object of the picture directly in the middle center. When outdoors I like to take a picture with the person about a third from the edge or so and allow something from the background to clearly be seen. Like the lake or tree or something. That is something I've heard from hobbyist photographers that take pictures of wildlife and flowers. Their pictures look good. Worth a shot, that is what I love about digital camera's, no more wondering if it is a good shot. I take three pictures and keep the best.
 

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Do you guys have some sort of water proof case you put them in while in the yaks. I would be scared I would go in the water.
Lefty has the photo-quality waterproof bag - works great. I use cheap enough cameras that it won't break my heart 'when' (not 'if') I dunk one. I keep it in a ziplock in a pocket in my vest while not in use.
 

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A couple more thoughts:

If you can get the rod, reel and artificial lure/fly in the pic I always appreciate seeing that too. Like to see the size of the bait in relation to the fish and to get an idea for how it was caught - bottom, top, middle, fly, conventional, etc...

Yak4fish has a stakeout pole with a camera mount on it - he sets the pole, sets the timer then moves himself and the fish back into the frame. Makes for much better solo kayak pictures than you can get from inside the boat.
 

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Do you guys have some sort of water proof case you put them in while in the yaks. I would be scared I would go in the water.
I used one of the plastic bags designed for the purpose -- I think it was an Aquapak, not sure. Got it for around $30 or so. It worked fine - a bit awkward to operate the camera, but not enough to make me consider taking it out of the bag and risking water damage. The most awkward part was, my camera used to zoom the lens all the way out when it booted up, so you'd have to flex the bag to allow that to take place without obstruction, otherwise the camera would shut itself back down. Also, heed the advice in the instructions -- place the lens of the camera against the lens of the bag. The pics came out just fine.
 

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Yak4fish has a stakeout pole with a camera mount on it - he sets the pole, sets the timer then moves himself and the fish back into the frame. Makes for much better solo kayak pictures than you can get from inside the boat.
Wow, now that's a cool idea... Even if you're using a bag wrapped around a non-waterproof camera, you could mount a platform to the stakeout pole and bungee the camera to it... (After you jammed it into the sand, of course...)
 

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A couple more thoughts:

If you can get the rod, reel and artificial lure/fly in the pic I always appreciate seeing that too. Like to see the size of the bait in relation to the fish and to get an idea for how it was caught .
I know some folks like to keep the baits "secret" as that could be their secret weapon.

But you mean like this Jeff?

:)

 

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I try not to make the object of the picture directly in the middle center. When outdoors I like to take a picture with the person about a third from the edge or so and allow something from the background to clearly be seen. Like the lake or tree or something. That is something I've heard from hobbyist photographers that take pictures of wildlife and flowers. Their pictures look good. Worth a shot, that is what I love about digital camera's, no more wondering if it is a good shot. I take three pictures and keep the best.
This also gives you room to PhotoShop the picture and substitute the background with one that doesn't give away the honeyhole. I always get a kick out of the ones Dave posts, with the grouper he catches from the serene, snowy mountain streams. :D
 
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