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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
With these fish its more of a matter of finding a spot that concentrates the fish and feeding then what they are eating. First and formost find a spot that has plenty of sandfleas. If you don't know what a sand flea is google MOLE CRAB: that is their real name. While you are at it run your fingers thru the sand and take what mother nature offers you. A Coolwhip container will serve to hold them and enough moist sand to keep them alive. Even handier is an empty spackle bucket with a lid and a handle. I tie my own rigs but you can buy them at any coastal bait and tackle shop. For most folks a light 10lb -12lb test rig is ideal. I like to go just a little lighter personaly but you will encounter some pretty broad shouldersd puppy drum with this set up so keep in mind that you will want to be able to land them in the surf. HOOK SIZES: #4 for the little fleas (tops for little fleas or shrimp) these are best when spots and croaker are in the mix along with whiting and pompano #2 for mediums and bigger pieces of shrimp when black drum and puppy drum are in the area. #1 hooks are good for the full grown fleas and these are better for bull whiting and bigger pompano as well as puppy drum and black drum.......(continued)
 

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Cant wait to go and use these techniques in a few weeks. Not sure, but i think most of these pompano are down off the southern coast. I will be a bit farther up north, but i'll give it a good effort! :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
More on The Best Spots: As I stated earlier, in my opinion finding large colonys of sand fleas is paramount to sucess. If there are lots of pieces of sand flea shells up on the beach near the colony the fish have found them too. Take a minute and get a feel for how they got to the place they are. The current can move them a good distance from where they originated. Play Sherlock Holmes and trace them back to the fish. A break in the bar will create a rip current or out suck carrying the majority of the shells unseen out into deeper water. A few of these will get scattered out on the beach on a subsequent high tide so don't get too excited if ther is just a few shells scattered at random but consider fishing the break in the bar especially during the early-mid stages of an incomming tide and after about an 30 min. past high tide. In this case I talking about areas that are exposed at high tide. The places that tend to form kiddy pools on the beach at low tide. If you spot these long kiddy pools at low tide go out in the surf and look for a colony of fleas. Hopefully you will find a colony just up current of thie pool or somewhere along its length. If you do just a hair downcurrent of the main part of the colony is where you will want to fish. Now go up to the high tide line and mark your reference points so you know where the colony will come in at and where the deep spots downstream of the colony will be and where the water will come into the pool from and EXIT. The exit point is key because as the water starts washing into the hole from over the little hump between the bar and the beach a current will form going toward the exit. This will continue until the tide leaves it high and dry. During this time you can position your 2 hook rig on the down current side of the out suck for best results. If that rod doesn't keep you to busy, fish the length of the little slough with a lighter rig. Here a carolina rig with a 3/4 oz egg sinker and a single hook wil work better. Cast up towards the end or past the end and hop the flea back to you in 2'-3' hops. Keep a steady pace or your flea will outrun your sinker and you will miss many of your strikes. When the action tapers off in close you should also have a break in the next bar out found to fish. The inside of the bar just down current of the break and right in the break have been best to me. with the right sinker your bait and line drag will pull the bait from the center to the edge of that area but also cast directly on top of the bar next to the break and ease your sinker over the edge and into the trough. Just over the bar is better on the outgoing tide. just inside of the bar is better on the incoming tides. I prefer shrimp on a #2 hook and 3-4 oz sinkers depending on the distance and current. sometimes you have to use either more weight or a sputnick to hold bottom with these longer cast. You also need to move up to a longer rod and 12-15lb line. Use a 50lb mono shock leader long enough to make 3-5 wraps around your reel spool with the leader run thru your guides and your sinker hanging by your reel when the rod is pointing straight up. Your fish from these areas will average a little larger normally. Most newer fishermen will be able to reach this are only when the tide is most of the way out, but it is a good area on any stage of the tide. It is also the place to put your drum rigs at if you have those.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
They normally are pretty plentiful around Ocracoke and the southern beaches of Hatteras in the summer. North of the point the pompano thin out but are still a part of the catch. In spots like the peat banks north of Oregon inlet a double hook rig with blood worms and a 3 oz bank sinker would be another application of this rig. Especially when the spot start moving thru the inlet. Over on the south side towards the surf a 2 hook fireball rig with a 3-4oz pyramid and cut bait should steadily produce blues along with some other species mixed in. Fireball rigs work pretty darn good anywhere for blues.
 
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