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Discussion Starter #1
So back in Cali I use to have a float tube that I fished from. Was thinking about getting another one. They are fairly inexpensive and I know how to rig a pole holder to one. I see a lot of people on this forum use a kayak. Just curious as to why and what may be the advantage over a float tube? I personally don't keep any of my fish. Always a catch and release type of guy. Only advantage that I thought of is the fact that some kayaks have live wells? Let me know what you think guys. Thanks
 

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Im not sure the float tube ever made it this far east seriously. Not sure but I used them often in Idaho and Montana.

Gene - Red》X《 - Asheboro
 

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Float tubes are great for short river floats and are an excellent choice for farm ponds. The only downside is the lack of speed. This can be a problem if thunderstorms blow up quickly or one is scared of northern water snakes. They are commonly mistaken for poisonous snakes.

I have one with one torn pocket zipper that I will let go cor 50 bucks. It is the u boat style.
 

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I would rather use a yak simply because of durability. Places I fish are rocky and the yak can take hits. Also, I can store lots of things on the yak if wading with it or camping. Lastly, I can paddle upriver in shallow waters as long as it's not super strong current.


Sent from my kayak...
 

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I use to see a few float tubes on the New River...and have sold a couple...but can't remember the last time someone asked about one. Seems like I saw a guy using one 2 or 3 years ago. Kayaks, canoes and personal pontoons all are very popular for the reasons mentioned and....you're out of the water and don't have to be concerned about temperature; higher for better sighting and ease of casting; can float thru shallows where otherwise you might have to walk thru; can anchor when desired etc. etc.

If price is consideration....and storage and transport space....tube wins in those areas....
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Never fished any of the rivers our creeks out here yet, but wouldn't be opposed. Can you drop a float tube in to Wheeler or some of the other lakes around here like Harris? I've looked at their web pages and saw nothing stating you couldn't.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Float tubes are great for short river floats and are an excellent choice for farm ponds. The only downside is the lack of speed. This can be a problem if thunderstorms blow up quickly or one is scared of northern water snakes. They are commonly mistaken for poisonous snakes.

I have one with one torn pocket zipper that I will let go cor 50 bucks. It is the u boat style.
Got any pics? I may be interested........
 

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Personal pontoon is the way to go IMO. Bring your oars if you're going to cover a huge area, but otherwise all you need are some good flippers and you'll get the best of both worlds.
 

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I've seen guys float tubing on small sections of Jordan. On local lakes, if they expect you to rent one of their boats and swimming is prohibited, I would expect to get harassed about launching a float tube regardless of their "rules".

Range is the big advantage of a kayak or canoe. I can cover 4 miles of river (8 miles round trip) from one launch and no shuttle in my canoe during low conditions in <10 hours. Try that in a float tube.

I see two obvious advantages with a float tube.

1. Cost

2. Portability - If you find a place that's relatively deep, requires a mile or more trek through the woods to the water, and you can't fish it from the bank ... a float tube is one of few options to fish it. These places exist in the Triangle, usually along rivers where access is limited and you can get to the water via a trail or pipeline/transmission line ROW corridor.

A small solo canoe or small yak makes your fishing options endless. A float tube isn't quite as versatile.
 

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I had a tube a long time ago when I lived in Denver. There was a lake in Aurora that allowed them and little else and was managed as a trophy fishery. Actually, I think they allowed other craft but the charge was significantly higher. I don't think they allowed motors. I rarely used it anywhere else; for the reasons listed earlier I usually preferred a kayak or raft (which I had or had access to). Another consideration is the water clarity; you want to rinse your waders well after going in dark water or they start to smell. The water doesn't have to be nasty to be a problem; a healthy warm aquatic environment has a lot of little organisms in it that can get in the outer neoprene layer and then die and decompose.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I've seen guys float tubing on small sections of Jordan. On local lakes, if they expect you to rent one of their boats and swimming is prohibited, I would expect to get harassed about launching a float tube regardless of their "rules".

Range is the big advantage of a kayak or canoe. I can cover 4 miles of river (8 miles round trip) from one launch and no shuttle in my canoe during low conditions in <10 hours. Try that in a float tube.

I see two obvious advantages with a float tube.

1. Cost

2. Portability - If you find a place that's relatively deep, requires a mile or more trek through the woods to the water, and you can't fish it from the bank ... a float tube is one of few options to fish it. These places exist in the Triangle, usually along rivers where access is limited and you can get to the water via a trail or pipeline/transmission line ROW corridor.

A small solo canoe or small yak makes your fishing options endless. A float tube isn't quite as versatile.
I see a lot of place allow you to bring your own personal water craft and have to pay a launch fee in order to. I think a float tube would be considered a personal water craft?
 

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I see a lot of place allow you to bring your own personal water craft and have to pay a launch fee in order to. I think a float tube would be considered a personal water craft?
I was just editing my earlier post when you asked this. I don't think NC does anything like what that lake in CO had; there was a difference between a float tube and a boat. A float tube was treated more like an extension of your person. This info about CO is over 20 years old though.
 

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2. Portability - If you find a place that's relatively deep, requires a mile or more trek through the woods to the water, and you can't fish it from the bank ... a float tube is one of few options to fish it. These places exist in the Triangle, usually along rivers where access is limited and you can get to the water via a trail or pipeline/transmission line ROW corridor.

A small solo canoe or small yak makes your fishing options endless. A float tube isn't quite as versatile.
I have a book on ultralight boatbuilding and in one of the pictures the author is holding a canoe over his head in one hand. A couple of plans get down into the teens. A narrow trail through thick scrub brush or spelunking through stovepipe (it would have to be a really good fishing spot :D) is still a problem.
 

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I've seen guys float tubing on small sections of Jordan. On local lakes, if they expect you to rent one of their boats and swimming is prohibited, I would expect to get harassed about launching a float tube regardless of their "rules".

Range is the big advantage of a kayak or canoe. I can cover 4 miles of river (8 miles round trip) from one launch and no shuttle in my canoe during low conditions in <10 hours. Try that in a float tube.

I see two obvious advantages with a float tube.

1. Cost

2. Portability - If you find a place that's relatively deep, requires a mile or more trek through the woods to the water, and you can't fish it from the bank ... a float tube is one of few options to fish it. These places exist in the Triangle, usually along rivers where access is limited and you can get to the water via a trail or pipeline/transmission line ROW corridor.

A small solo canoe or small yak makes your fishing options endless. A float tube isn't quite as versatile.
Be careful using ROW's, they are private property and unless you have permission to be there you can be charged with trespassing.
 

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One other concern comes to mind browsing current threads - grass & weeds. From this time of year until fall a lot of lakes have weeds at or just below the surface around most banks. Near me, Harris can be particularly difficult to navigate without going through a few weedy spots. Weeds are a real pain when you are hanging down in the water using flippers.
 

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Forgot to mention on advantage of an FT. One can maneuver and cast/troll all at the same time. This cannot be done in a canoe, kayak, or jon. Flyfishing from a float tube in a pond is most relaxing and satisfying.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
One other concern comes to mind browsing current threads - grass & weeds. From this time of year until fall a lot of lakes have weeds at or just below the surface around most banks. Near me, Harris can be particularly difficult to navigate without going through a few weedy spots. Weeds are a real pain when you are hanging down in the water using flippers.
Back in Cali, I seen people rig trolling motors to their tubes! When it comes to weeds, I'm familiar to that type of situation. During the summer months a lot of the local lakes around me would have an abundance of weed lines. I would just fish outside those edges. Now it may be different if there's tall growth under water that I may not see. I wouldn't want to destroy those pads with a flipper!
 

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I notice a lot of the modern designs have above the water seating; more like a personal pontoon. My comments were about the one I had, used with waders. It was like an adult sized baby float ring.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
AAAhhh I see. Even though most of them are above seating, I would still buy a pair of waders for them cold days
 
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