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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When a flounder picks up your line, you will feel the line being pulled slowly out, give the flounder line so it doesn't feel the weight of the sinker. This is the hard part, don't set the hook instantly, give the fish time to get your bait into its mouth real good. A count of twenty to thirty is usually long enough. Then take up the slack in the line and set the hook. You have a better chance of getting him in now. This is esp. effective on light tackle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Flounder are likely to spread out over a wide area but like to sit and wait for an opportunity to pounce on something to eat. On a falling tide drift around the mouths of inlets, rivers, and the edges of channel, rather than anchoring. On rising tides work the pilings around piers and docks by drifting past them as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
When flounder fishing with hook and line, many anglers prefer using a jig with a plastic tail that resembles a shrimp or minnow. Live or cut bait can also be utilized with a jig head, as can an effective additive such as the new "Gulp" or "Fish bites" products. Using a carolina type rig works well when drift fishing or casting. Some anglers prefer a slip sinker rig when using live shrimp or baitfish. When using the slip sinker rig cast your bait and let it sit on the bottom for a couple minutes. If you don't detect a pickup lift the rod tip and let it sit again.
 

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Topsail Angler --- I like fishing tips, so keep them rolling. I grew up in a time that dynamite was easy to get, old crank phones were being phased out and we were using them to call up catfish in Alamance Creek. It seemed we could always get a fish fry together though, so I'll try to keep it legal, somewhat. I saw your post about Gulp Baits. I checked price at the Neuse and almost knocked two display rows over backing up. For years I have been using menhaden oil mixed with mineral oil to sweeten soft grubs. I use a hypodermic needle to inject them right after putting them on the hook. A drop on a fly doesn't hurt. Don't knock it, it works. My good neighbor tells me that I cheat and he's been threatening to turn me in to the DEA for illegal paraphernalia. :D


Regards , Forrest
 
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Never tried dynamite (probably would of if I coulda found some), but I did have an old crank phone generator years ago. Worked great for catfish...but could get "ticklish" if you were standing in the water! Ha!

I appreciate the flounder tip using menhaden oil. Interesting.

Used to poke holes in dog food cans to attract shrimp for bait. Also used fishmeal rolled up with clay and "chummed" for shirmp. Wait a while and toss the cast net. Whoa! Someone told me recently they thought that had been outlawed.... :confused:
 

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Seabiscuit---Wow! Have they really outlawed chumming shrimp. I use a mixture of fishmeal and muck inside a piece of ladies nylon hose. Even catch flounder feeding on the shrimp. I'll never go without seafood as long as I am able to throw my cast net. Obtaining the hose can be as interesting as fishing sometimes.:D
 

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I just heard this recently...haven't confirmed it. I'll see what I can find out.

PS The "limit" on live bait shrimp is 100 per man. Ever heard of anyone being checked? I find that hard to imagine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Forrest - Great tip regarding the menhaden oil, thanks!

Yeah, those new gulp and fish bites baits aren't cheap but then again they last a long time. I fished a strip cut from the Gulp flat package (about 75 cents worth) for about 4 hours and was still catching fish on the original piece.

When I was on Guam in the 70's - I made freinds with a lot of the local fisherman. I met few that were missing a hand or a few fingers from dynamite fishing. Guess that was popular there for a while cause after the war there was plenty of explosives around. I decided to stick to monofilement.
 

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I thought I'd try and rejuevinate this thread mainly because it is a great way to help new fisherman get to the catching and eating part. speckeled trout would make a good next tips thread. Anyway not being an expert flounder fisherman maybe I might learn some more tricks. Here's my limited contribution.

When flounder fishing with live bait remember that the fish will be keying on the most abundant species of bait. While they feed mainly on minnows and small fish they will take advantage of shrimp runs also. Normally I start the year off fishing mud minnows and as the small schools of baby menhaden become common I try those first. In the late Summer and early Fall I switch to finger mullet and usually try to increase the size of the baits. Strip baits made from flounder bellies will suffice if you need a couple of extra baits to finish out. Just make sure you leave the head and tail intact so the fish can be measured should the need arise. AL
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
When fishing for flounder or sea trout using artificial lures with soft-plastic tails and jig heads as hooks, try to use contrasting-colors. For instance, If you have a light-colored lure, try using a red jig head. If your lure is dark-colored, use a white jig head. Contrasting colors draw more attention to your lure. Experiment with different combo's till you find the right one for the conditions. Tie your jighead onto the line directly, don't use a swivel. Make sure you put the plastics on with the hook showing on top of the bait (so belly down, as the jig head is designed to travel hook point on top). This cuts down on snags and makes the lure travel more natural.
 

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Mike--- You are putting out some mighty fine advice, especially for the guys just getting into saltwater fishing. Many moons ago when I first started fishing saltwater I thought you to have a big snap swivel on everything you fished with, no wonder that I never caught anything.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks Forrest. But honestly, I'm just a warm-up guy for the real Salts like yourself. I appreciate your advice as well as your humor - especially about those gummy worms :D

Yeah I made the same mistake when I was younger with the swivels. Made it easy to change baits.....which of course I did often cause I wasn't catchin fish :rolleyes: Same thing with leaders - took me a while to figure out when to use them and when not too.

Still don't always get it right. In hindsight, I should have put a leader on this week-end when jigging the Gray Trout. I lost 3 Sting Silvers - probably due to rock cuts or maybe a Blue attack judging from the very light tap before nothing was left on the end of the line. I don't think a dark brown colored metal leader would have cut down on the catch in this case but would have saved $12 bucks of hardware.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Here is two more that are fresh in my mind from this week-end.

An old salty fisherman once shared this one with me many moons ago: He said when the cold weather first sets in, you'll find the flounder up in the mud bottom areas before they leave the sound all together. He went on to explain that the mud stayed warm longer than the sandy bottom. I have found this to be true. For instances, all my flounder yesterday was caught in a muddy bottom creek channel (about 5 feet deep). You'll find mud bottoms near land - in the land based creeks and in areas where the estuaries feed into the sound.

If you are like me, sometimes when you have live bait out on the bottom, you get distracted and leave the rod alone for a little while. When this happens, when returning to the rod always lightly tighten any slack that may be in the line, then give the line a quick short tug to set the hook. Set the hook you say?....right, just as if you felt a hit on your line. Sometimes a flounder will pick up that fish while you aren't paying attention and if you just start to real the line in, he'll spit the bait out. Like yesterday when I was flounder fishing, I saw some top water action near me (something cutting through the baitfish) so I reached for my other rod that was rigged with a She-Dog lure and made a few casts in that direction, didn't have any bites so I returned to my flounder rod. Out of sheer habit, I tighten my line and gave it a "set the hook" motion and sure enough I felt that ole familiar, pleasant wiggle and tug, up comes a 16 inch flounder!

Tight lines and fat flounder to ya.

Mike
 

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Mike, thanks for the great flounder tips. I can not wait to get out on the sound this summer and try my luck. I may even have a chance now. Maybe this is also why I have never caught one of those rascals. Got to wait a bit after the bite to set the hook huh? I am used to those fast hitting spotted bass at Lanier where you almost have to set the hook before the bite to hook'em. Hahahaha. Thanks again.
 

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These are all good tips, but you left-out the most important one!
After catching a flounder roll him in HOUSE-AUTRY seafood breader then pitch him into some hot grease about 350 deg. A little lemon juice and maybe some hushpuppies.
Now this is the best flounder tip you'll ever get!!!
 

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They don't have tender mouths, but the way they eat the baitfish, sometimes you can snatch the hook right out.
When I fillet mine, I split the fish pretty much down the lateral line first. Then I cut across the tail top to bottom, and the head the same way. You go back to the lateral line cut, and fillet the meat right off. Start at the head, hold the meat in one hand and run your knife across the bone and the meat will come right off. You will get two fillets off of each side of the fish. You do each side the same way. You should be able to see through the fish when you are done. With a sharp knife I can do one in about a minute to a minute and a half. Once the flounder reaches five pounds and up, it is also best to skin the fillets if your are going to fry the fish. You don't scale the fish if you are going to skin it. Again you need a sharp knife. Flip the fillet skin down. Start your knife at the tail end of the fillet, and work it to the head end. It is very easy once you do it a couple times. It is the same way you would do drum, grouper, spanish, etc. You start the knife between the skin and meat. Grab the skin where you started,and pull the skin while you work the knife the other way. When done properly, there will not be any meat on the skin. Hope this is clear enough, and helpful. If not, I am sure some of the other guys will chime in.
 

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I have had some luck in finding an area that looks good then baiting it with canned corn then coming back at next tide change and catching good #s of flat fish.
Just my .02's
 
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