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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
OK, sometimes my brain works ... sometimes it just goes into neutral. I have told everyone that I am a rank amateur as far as salt water fishing is concerned but that seems to be my new interest. I like saltwater fish better than freshwater on the table.

Now, for my pontification today. I was just looking at a boating catalog and came across underwater lights for floundering. As one who has gigged more than one flat fish, it suddenly occurred to me that flatties are found in the shallows near grass lines at night. The biq question is this; do they exhibit the same behavior during the day (except maybe during the hottest months)? If they do, I have just answered a lot of my own questions about catching them. If not, more study is required until the weather becomes bearable for me and my 'yak.

Coach
 

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Coach,

That is a big question you are pontificating on. There is no set answer but I'll try to "shed some light" on it and hopefully some of the salties (we are blessed with some great ones) on this board will ring in as well.

First - let's examine gigging conditions. Most folks go when it's a low tide with clear water and little to no moon or it is overcast. These are ideal gigging conditions because you can find them in shallow water near the shore line (grass) and because there is little light - they will sit still even as you approach them. They don't hang out here all the time though. But at least we now know where to hunt for them under those conditions.

It's important to remember they are ambush setters, they like structure and they like the dinner to come to them (they are not hunters). So watching bait patterns and tidal flows give you big clues of where to look for them under different conditions. Closer to high tide you can find them near docks, oyster rocks, ledges and the like.

Here's a general rule of thumb - in shallow water (low tide) baitfish have less room to manuever so flounder can set an easy ambush on the flats or near the bank but in deeper water (high tide) baitfish have more room to move so the Flounder looks for other ways to set an ambush (structure and current eddies).

Likewise - knowing whether its a rising or falling tide helps you decide which side of channels and inlets to position yourself.

I rarely stay put when flounder fishing, I either drift or if casting, I move ever 10 or 15 minutes. However patience is the key to flounder fishing.

We have a thread in the saltwater tips section titled "Flounder tips" - you may want to browse that thread if you haven't already.

Hope this helps you some.

Mike
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks, y'all ... I'll keep reading and studying through this cold weather and, hopefully be better prepared to catch some flounder come spring. A

s a teacher I often get asked by my students when school will be out. I always tell them "never". They are always surprised by that answer until I tell them that there will always be something they will need to know, consequently, there will always be school. Now, off to do my homework.
 
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