NC Angler Forums banner
1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I'm taking a trip to Oak Island with some family early/mid October and I'm looking to get away and get my line tight. I'm more used to fly fishing for bass/trout so I have a few questions. A little guidance would go a long way for me.

I may be able to bring a kayak, but I'm also not opposed to wading. Where should I target them this time of year? I know they can be caught in the surf, but that seems a bit tricky with a fly rod. Would I be better off targeting them inshore in the marshes? Are there any good spots or access points to get in (or wade) to find them?

Also I've read a lot of conflicting information on what they'll go after this time of year. Should I use a fly popper/topwater fly? Or get something like a redfish crack, or use a baitfish pattern?

Thanks, and tight lines
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,435 Posts
I don't know the area well enough to give you any tips on locations for inside fishing. There will be reds in the marsh, and a kayak is not a bad idea. Many areas down here are not wadeable due to the mud bottom. Also, bring good footwear because there are usually oysters in the marsh. There will also be reds in the surf, probably a lot of them, and a fly rod is a great way to target them. For fly fishing the surf, I usually try the last couple hours of a falling tide. Look for outflows and rips, and try to feed your line and fly into that current. I strongly recommend a stripping basket as line management is the biggest challenge to fly fishing the surf. You don't need to bomb out 80' casts. 30' - 40' are more than adequate in most places. Generally speaking, you're best off fishing down the beach, somewhat parallel to the shoreline or at a 30 - 45 degree angle rather than straight out / perpendicular. Time your casts to land on the back side of a breaking wave and try to swim your fly through the wash just as you would if it were a river. When the next wave starts to break, haul your line out and repeat. Try to read the currents and use that to feed your line into likely holding or feeding areas. Look for baitfish getting whacked and throw casts at that too. I generally prefer a floating line for that type of fishing, but some guys like Intermediates. To me that's not necessary as most of the water I'm targeting is no more than 2 - 3 feet deep, plus it's a lot easier to haul a floating line out of the water than any kind of sink tip. Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,579 Posts
I don't fly fish, but have a few friends that try.
What I observed was pick the calmest bluebird day, wind at your back & go.
Sinking line is what I recalled Seth said he was using.
Hope this helps ........ICM
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top