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I saw an episode last night that had him and his son fishing out of the hank Parker signature line of hobie kayaks. this really made me realize just how versatile these things were. Makes me wonder about buying one when the bonus comes out in July. Anyone have any comments on this or anyother type of kayak?
 

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Tarheel Fish and Game has them in stock. If I were to buy another I would probably go with the Hobie because you can still move the boat while fighting a fish. However, the cockpit is always wet because of the slot that the pedals are attached through.
 

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The Hobie Adventure is very popular among a lot of yak-fishers. It does cause spelling problems, though, unless you actually have to sell the boat ('peddle' it) to make it go. :D

There are a lot of lower-cost options out there. In my case, I decided to start with a lower-cost yak, and if I missed the pedal drive, I'd consider buying up in a couple of years.
 
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The Hobie's are expensive, but the pedal drive is awesome. I test drove an Adventure and it was a rocket, but a little tippy for my tastes. The outback and outback sport are very stable shorter kayaks - great for small waters and some folks happily use them in the ocean. The new Revolution looks like the bomb for pedal-driven fishing - longer and sleeker than the outback (=faster + storage), a little wider than the adventure (=more stable).

A couple of things the pedal drive doesn't do well:
- go backwards. Still have to have a paddle along for anything other than forward thrust.
- go shallow. You can press both pedals forward and the flippers will lay mostly flat against the underside, but not all the way. Will still bang on rocks, drag in sand and catch weeds.

Still, for the option of 2 handed fishing its a pretty fair trade off. Leg power is much more efficient than arms/shoulders/chest/back, and the propulsion that the flippers give is unbelievable. No question that you can go faster and farther under pedal power than you can with the paddle.

I went with paddle power on my first kayak, mostly because of price but also because I wanted to experience kayaking as well as kayak fishing. There's something majestic about the paddle stroke and silently carving through a glassy surface (though much of that majesty is lost when you're heading back to the ramp after a long day of fishing, upwind and upcurrent - then its just a workout!). I'm inclined to go with a paddle power tandem/single convertible (Native Watercraft Magic 14.5) on my next one as well, but am toying with a Hobie for my wife - she loves pedal boats, but hasn't found the kayak bug yet.
 

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Can't say anythig about the Hobies but I love my yaks. I have 10' and 12' Tarpons by Wilderness Systems. I bought the 10' first and fish it mostly in the New and Nolichucky rivers for small mouth. Later I found I great deal on the 12 footer and couldn't pass it up (now I always have a boat for a buddy). I fish it in lakes and down east and it does just fine, though 14' or 16' would do you better on big water. No matter what you end up with it'll be loads of fun.
 
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