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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I cant remember the last time I caught something on a crank, topwater, lipless, etc.
Fishing mostly small lakes around Charlotte. I can usually bring in a bass or two with soft plastics.
I try to mix up size, color, depth.

Any thoughts as to what I may be doing wrong?
Perhaps a couple "slump buster" hard baits you'd recommend?

Thanks All,

Clark
 

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Red X Angler
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This past weekend I threw a few different things while I was out with Brady and Cam... they caught several fish on a rattle trap, and I caught nothing on other baits. Rattle Trap seemed to be a good option at the time!
 
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Those count...more specifically, I suppose, those are considered slash baits but they are basically a jerk bait that can be ripped harder and faster. I like those as well and have caught a lot of bass on them year round.

Not sure if they are a jerk bait but ive been having good luck with XR6'S and XR8'S. Match the conditions for color.
 

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Red X Angler
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XR6 in Glass Ghost does well at Belews.

Out of curiosity, what's considered the difference between a jerk bait and slash bait?
 

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XR6 in Glass Ghost does well at Belews.

Out of curiosity, what's considered the difference between a jerk bait and slash bait?
Rapala was one of the first companies to coin the phrase "slash bait" as it related to a specific type of jerk bait.

A slash bait is a jerk bait or a crank bait, that has enough differences to put them into their own category.

One of the key differences is that slash baits have narrower lips and heavier bodies, weighted so you can really rip them and they won't roll over. It's really hard to "over jerk" them.

If you rip a regular jerk bait like a KVD or a Rogue, the bait will tend to roll over and spin rather than track right and left.

Slash baits are made to be fished fast but that doesn't mean they can't be fished slow, either. Most of them suspend which is a good trait for cooler water or tough conditions. The other thing I like about them is they have great action with lighter twitches, too.

Most slash baits won't get as deep as regular jerk baits which can be a limitation at times, but they are great baits and catch lots of bass!

Just my thoughts, anyway...
 

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Smaller water, the trap is a killer. Im in Charlotte too. Let me know if you want me to show you a thing or two. Haha. JK.. Where are you fishing?
 
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The lipless crank (trap) is also my favorite hard bait. I like to have small to middlin' size ones as well as a few larger ones. The little ones are good for slaying panfish with the occasional bass thrown in and fishing one and catching a few makes it easier for me to then upsize with confidence.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Smaller water, the trap is a killer. Im in Charlotte too. Let me know if you want me to show you a thing or two. Haha. JK.. Where are you fishing?
Sounds good, love the Hornets themed logo you got there.
I'm typically bank fishing in small Ballantyne ponds and sometimes down at Carolina Lakes in SC. Up for wherever though, haven't taken the Kayak out to many places yet! How about you?
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
This past weekend I threw a few different things while I was out with Brady and Cam... they caught several fish on a rattle trap, and I caught nothing on other baits. Rattle Trap seemed to be a good option at the time!
Curious, what differentiates the Rattle Trap from other lipless crank baits? Seems like most imitators have a good rattle to them as well.
 

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Curious, what differentiates the Rattle Trap from other lipless crank baits? Seems like most imitators have a good rattle to them as well.
Mostly the label.

They popularized lipless cranks the way Rapala did lipped stick baits (reading that back, I understand why no one calls them that). I mostly use off brands personally.
 

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I am with Opti, RatLtrap was the first widely used lipess rattlebait and the name stuck. Alot of the earlier versions of other brands (Diamond shad, cordell spot ect) had the similar diamond shape. When KVD won the Classic and put the Red Eye shad on the map, alot of companies began going away from the diamond shapes to keep up, some still refer to these newer baits as "traps"... basically the same thing.

I dont often throw traps unless I am fishing around schools of shad in shallow water or fishing around hydrilla, I perfer a regular lipped crankbait as they are better suited for the water I fish.
 

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Fishing in a bass boat with several rods I might use lipped cranks more. Since I am usually in the kayak with 2 rods total (and using one 80% of the time), I like baits I can let fall to different depths. I often have a lipless crank on one rod and soft plastic behind lead on the other. A lot of bites come on the fall, so another tip to the OP is to get the line tight quickly.

So if I quibble with you on a point it would be:
I perfer a regular lipped crankbait
and I would say you don't prefer "a crankbait"; you prefer 4 or 5... :D
 

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I have around 15 to 18 rods on my bass boat with one always rigged with a lip less bait and I STILL don't use it that much! Hahaha!

I have found them to be useful in windy situations and over grass but generally rely on other baits to get bass in the boat.
 

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I have around 15 to 18 rods on my bass boat with one always rigged with a lip less bait and I STILL don't use it that much! Hahaha!

I have found them to be useful in windy situations and over grass but generally rely on other baits to get bass in the boat.
Wow; so on a typical day, how many have hard baits versus soft plastic? How many different crankbaits?

EDIT - Just to be clear, I do not think that the trap is a better alternative than a bunch of crankbaits that reach different depths if you have a bunch of rods and can have a selection of cranks ready to cast. But if you need to do it with one or two rods casting to the deep water off the point, medium depth along the banks inside the cove and then shallow back in the recesses, the trap is a good option.
 

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Wow; so on a typical day, how many have hard baits versus soft plastic? How many different crankbaits?
I am about like lewis, boat load of rods I usually carry 12-14.

6 of them are "crankbait" rods, this time of year they all have a crankbait tied on, spring and summer 2 of those always have topwater plugs. My big cranking rod for big deep diving plugs pretty much stays in the box as it doesnt work out real good for the baits I throw now, the other 5 are rigged with an assortment of plugs, 2 or 3 that get alot of action, the other 2 not so much but they have their moments, as it gets colder 1 or 2 will be assigned to jerkbait duty.

4 are rigged with jigs or plastic- Usually a flipping jig, swim or finesse jig, a tx rig and a shakeyhead.

2 other rods got spinnerbaits tied on.
 
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