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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Had a guy at cabela's tell me today that states were banning felt soles, I was going to cherokee trout fishing next week and was trying to find out to make sure cherokee NC hasn't banned them.
 

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I know some states are or have banned felt. Only a few. The last time I checked NC wasn't one of them though. I'd call some fishing shops up there to make sure it's not different on the reservation though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks guys just spoke with a fly shop there in cherokee through FB and they said they were not banned in NC or the reservation. Just thought it was kinda crazy that some states have banned them! To me felt is the safer sole when it comes to slick mosdy rocks and that type stuff. Course I have never used anything other than felt bottoms. All I use is the boots, I wade in shorts with my gear in a fanny pack. To hot in summer for me to wear waders!
 

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Make the switch to lugged soles with studs and help protect the fishery. I use a wading staff if the water is moving to quick for my comfort.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
When these felts wear out, im going to just buy the Strap on type studded that straps over the boot and use those until I can save up to purchase a good pair of studded.
 

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I've yet to try the spikes. I'd like to see how they compare in traction capabilities. I've heard almost all no answers when I inquired if they were as good as felt.

The felt argument is more complex than most folks like to realize. Tons of things transfer the species that they're trying to keep out. Birds, boats, boat trailers, a wool fishing fly, pants, gloves.....etc. A large portion of blame are handed to felt boots mainly in part to their lengthy drying process. Also, this is circumstantial depending on the actual water that's being dealt with. Climate is a big factor. Felt boot banning is but a very small band aid on a huge wound.

I will say though that if any help at all is to be offered then it's better than nothing. That being said, I don't know that it's worth being injured in a remote area just to try and use a different soled boot. Use what's safe for you. I've seen rocks that felt can't "shake a stick at" in regards to traction. I know rubber or spikes aren't going to save your bacon.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I've yet to try the spikes. I'd like to see how they compare in traction capabilities. I've heard almost all no answers when I inquired if they were as good as felt.

The felt argument is more complex than most folks like to realize. Tons of things transfer the species that they're trying to keep out. Birds, boats, boat trailers, a wool fishing fly, pants, gloves.....etc. A large portion of blame are handed to felt boots mainly in part to their lengthy drying process. Also, this is circumstantial depending on the actual water that's being dealt with. Climate is a big factor. Felt boot banning is but a very small band aid on a huge wound.

I will say though that if any help at all is to be offered then it's better than nothing. That being said, I don't know that it's worth being injured in a remote area just to try and use a different soled boot. Use what's safe for you. I've seen rocks that felt can't "shake a stick at" in regards to traction. I know rubber or spikes aren't going to save your bacon.
I absolutuly agree 100% Let someone slip and hit their head on a rock. That to me is more a concern than spreading bacteria through rivers!! That's why I don't think we will see many more states if any at all ban them. Peoples safety is more important than a bacteria in a stream!
 
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