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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been offered a great deal on an Alumacraft 16.5' Classic Deluxe CS. I know this boat is built for lakes and rivers, but I have read good things about its use in the sound/ inshore.

I plan on buying a boat that I can split time at the coast and in the lake. The boat will be taken out of the water after every drop and cleaned well. As long as I take the proper measure to keep electrolysis and corrosion from occurring, do you guys see any issue with dropping this boat in the sound?

It seems like a great starter boat for all types of fishing, and the deal is from a friend who is nearly giving the thing away.

It is in great shape with a 40 horse yamaha with less than 50 hrs.

Any suggestions or recommendations by the veteran boat owners?

I am new here and already love this site. Thanks.

-Josh
 

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Hey Josh. Can't help but really looking forward to the answer. Had aluminum and loved it in freshwater, but never tried it in the salt. Light weight for easy towing, no crying over cracked gel-coat, low speed doinks off stumps, beaching on gravel, etc.. I was more concerned with the motor and the topside accessories on my particular boat than the hull itself for salt issues. Didn't really have a saltwater feel back then, but now that I've got the bug I really like the idea of an aluminum bay-style boat for inshore saltwater fishing.
 

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I dont see a problem with it at all.

Galvanic corrosion usually hits hard when the boat is left in the water for extended periods of time and if you have dis-similar metals (i.e. stainless screws into the aluminum.. etc...)

if you're just using it one day and hauling it out same day and hose it down really well with fresh water.. shouldnt be an issue. Inspect rivets and welds occasionally.

Also, make sure your protective anodes (Zincs) on the motor are in good shape, replace if needed when they get about half worn down.

Welcome on to the site!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Good news...sounds like you guys are reinforcing what I already thought.

The main idea for the saltwater use of this boat is to pick my dad up in Fayetteville and go to the coast for a 1-2 day fishing trip. The boat will always be pulled out of the water and washed down real well.

Like Jeff said, I really like the idea of the boat for economical reasons. Easier upkeep and lighter for the tow. I drive an older F-150 and don't want to wear it out with a heavy glass boat that looks funny when put in the lake.

Thanks again for your replies....
 

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I have been using a 14' aluminum in the salt and have had no problems with it. I have also heard of some guys putting a rhino linning on the bottoms to help seal them up and extra protection from the oyster beds and what not. I am going to try it on mine so I'll let ya know how it turns out.

Just make sure you keep a check on the zincs like Dave said and you should have no problems. Don't and it gets real expensive.
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Also, the 40hp Yamaha on this boat is the the original setup. Obviously it is not a marine specific motor.

Question 1: Are regular outbards fine for saltwater without any conversions? (as long as they are flushed well w/ freshwater after each use)

Question 2: Are the Zincs/ anodes something that comes on all motors or is this strictly an aftermarket addition for those wanting to prevent corrosion? (I understand the concept as I have dealt with electrolysis in automobiles....just unsure of boat set-up for the anodes)

I am pretty good mechanically, but new to boat motors explaining all the questions. Thanks again for all the help! This is making my decision much clearer.
 

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Most "saltwater" versions of engines were advertising hype with a few minor improvements that have been emplemented in all engines today. Flush w/each use and check/lube things regularly to protect against corroson and you'll be fine. I keep looking at different boats thinking on what to buy and in my price range it looks like I can get more boat for the $$ if I go aluminum and probably will when I do buy. SeaArk has some CC boats that appeal to me. Keep in mind in salt water flushing the trailer and keeping the wheel bearings lubed and wiring protected is very important as well. I shoot white lithium grease in every bulb, socket, connector, cable, pivot point and even in the key hole to protect against the salt.
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks sundrop....

Well all my questions have been reinforced by the members here at NCangler.com.

As soon as I work up the money, I do believe I will grab this great deal. As soon as it happens, I will post pics of the boat and the harvest from the first fish.

Thanks again to everyone who posted answers for me.

Best,

Josh S.
"Keep it 'tween the buoys"
 
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