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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just bought my first kayak a used moken. Since i an new to kayak fishing i have a few questions mostly concerning paddles. Firstly is there a paddle length to boat length ratio. (also it seems to me that the longer up to a point the better am i correct) I know that the heavier the paddle the more tiring on long paddles it becomes. secondly are there better brands of paddles to look for and crappy brands to run away from. The boat is 14ft and any help is greatly thanked in advance.
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Red X Angler
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The paddle you used at Bay River was a 260 I think I will measure to make sure. It is heavier than most so if you had no trouble with your 8/9 mile circle at Bay River you will be fine. I personally like a longer paddle than most, a longer paddle will be drier than a shorter one. Lighter is less tiring than heavier etc. Lots of personal preference comes into play. If you haven't gotten one by the next time your out this way, you can pick out one to take home with you to try out. Also if you find a good deal on a cheap one it doesn't hurt to have a spare stored in the yak in case you break your main paddle especially if you are paddling moving water.

If you want a crate with rod holders and trolling mounts I'll make you up one of those. You can have one of the Hummingbirds off of the old jon boat to rig up as well.

She is a beautiful boat, get some water lined up for the next time I am out that way.

Darrell
 

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I don't think there is a relationship be lenght of boat and paddle length.
I think you'll find the wider the boat the longer the paddle.
I have 3 different kayaks and use the same paddle for all 3. the paddle seems too long in my narrow 14ft kayak. just fine in my slightly wider 12' kayak and short in my tandom kayak(ocean 2XL)..short meaning there is more drip from the paddle into the kayak.

paddle holder is a must..
rods mounts too..
most important..a comfortable seat..my current fishing kayak has the best seat but too hard. I added a seat cushion from my father-in-laws old power wheel chair..he sat for hours every day in it..it works.

FWIW

-dkenny
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Mr Darrell i think i can set up some water when ever you get a chance to get down this way. Also it has a nice rail already setup for a milk crate, i think there i can find one at the shop.
 

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Upon further pondering about the two paddles I mentioned earlier in the thread, I do like the rubber grip on the more expensive paddle (Bending Branches). Easier grip and not as cold certain times of year. Other than that I can't put one above the other.
 

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Red X Angler
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Bring the boat when you come this way next time, along with any peripherals you have we'll figure out how you want it set up and where everything should be. I can put it in the garage and work on it so that it will be ready next time you come. I have more free time than you, and can put some smoke in the woodstove when it is cold.

Darrell
 

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You have probably figured it out from other posts, but there is no specific formula for paddle length that works for everyone. It's a function of how wide the boat is, how far from the water line your shoulders and hips are and the paddling motion that is most comfortable for you. IMO a paddle that is a little too long is a minor annoyance compared to one that is too short (which can be a major pain), so if 230 - 240 seems like the right range I would try the 240 first.
 

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another thing I forgot to mention - the higher dollar paddles are more likely to be worth the difference if you paddle for longer amounts of time and in cold water. The aluminum shaft paddles can numb bare hands if the water is cold even on a warm day. The high end paddles are typically lighter but still strong and that weight makes a difference if paddling for long periods of time.
 

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CF will typically transfer heat at a rate of about half what aluminum does. I have to use words like typically and about because CF is not a specific compound. It's heat transfer rate is 21-180 W/m*K, depending on the particular CF product, while aluminum is 210. So it can be as little as a tenth as conductive. Bottom line is if you dip an aluminum paddle in cold water it will suck the heat out of your hands; CF not so much.
 
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