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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here is a tip I got from paying attention to my non-fishing grandmother. She raised 9 kids on my grandfather's cotton mill paycheck. She was raised up to be thrifty which meant not throwing away anything useful. One of the things she saved were lightly used ziplock bags. They got used one time for food and if they were not greasy or bloody lots of times she would wash them out while she was washing dishes and let them air dry. One day I got a little concerned about what she was using them for and asked one of my aunts who got a kick out of it. She showed me my grandmothers considerable collection in one of the drawers of an old cupboard in the back room and then opened the doors to the top where I could see a whole shelf full of odds and ends such as buttons,safety pins, pincushions full of pins and needles, drawer pulls, Paper clips, staples, screws, nails and etc. If she had it, she knew right where to look for it. It took me awhile longer but I finally figured out that them ziplocks would keep your leaders tangle free. Then I took a tip from the pros and started putting carboard in them ziplocks. Next came the line winder shape complete with line holding 1/2" long cuts snipped in the end of them and holes punched out to accept the hooks and finally cut up coffee stirrers to cover hook points. Most of the cardboard I use is cut from cereal boxes.
 

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Red X Angler
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I do very similar things Sinker. I put each bottom rig already loaded with a 1oz to 4 oz sinker ( I have some of each ) and hooks, as well as each of my flounder rigs in those little half sandwich sized baggies in my box. I also put similar bobbers in baggies as well as my weights seperated by size so I can grab it and get back fishing. I use cardboard to wrap my sabiki rigs on and baggie them also. I keep a bag with reel oil and lube and a rod repair kit. I have a bag for a stringer and use bags to seperate anything I carry in quantity that isnt packaged well when I buy it. I can find a use in most anything..LOL I use Folgers cans, Pringles tubes ( and the new Lays chip tubes are better because they are plastic) for stuff too. I toss all of my worms left from a trip into a Folgers can with holes in the top and after a few trips I build up a stash and don't buy bait. Not to mention what I add when I'm working in the yard and dig a few up. And I've already told about my old aquarium of minnows....
My mom was thrifty since we didnt have much growing up, so I picked up the bug of """Hmmm what can I do with this......"" LOL !
 

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Al--- I can identify with your comments on this thread. Know all about the good old cotton mill village. Hung out on the company store bench, sex education at the barber shop, religion at the Baptist Church. All side by side. Being thrifty was a necessity for survival. Waste not --want not.:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hmmmm I'll have to try out my hole punchers on those milk jugs. I doubt my little single hole cutter would do it, but I bet my 3 hole punch would. I've really had few problems with the card board though. One or two will get wet now and then but on that scale it sure beats untangling a ball of leaders with a few plugs mixed in after a few days fishing. Whether paper or plastic they will save a lot of leaders from being tossed in the garbage. with the cardboard (or plastic) they are easier to to stack and keep under control. I have been known to show up withn a gallon ziplock for a tackle box but a friend of mine fishes bass tournaments with his selection of lures in his shirt pocket and on his rods. He wins his share too.
Sundrop: I have a ton of coffee cans. Plastic Folgers containers also. The metal coffee cans are great for sinkers if you are making them.
 

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I can definitely identify with all of the above. Sounds like we all came up around the same folks........actually I believe it was the generation. I feel blessed to have learned so much from them. I just hope that we are diligent to pass it along to the newer generations. Been using sandwich baggies for my tackle for years. I bet I have 40 baggies in my saltwater box alone. Actually I use an old duffle bag now for my saltwater tackle. Inside of it besides a couple of gallon sized zip locks that hold the smaller zip locks with leaders, live bait rigs and all manners of other various rigs I have two plastic sewing boxes that hold various sized lead as well as two flat plastic storage boxes. One contains an assortment of plugs and the other holds all of my loose terminal tackle. Up until this year I was using an old wooden box that an old man's wife that I helped take care of gave me after he passed. I used it for many years with the same set up above but it just got too darn heavy so I switched to the duffle bag.

My offshore tackle bag is one of those soft coolers that I picked up at a corporate golf tourney and it contains the same storage containers as my inshore bag mentioned above.

I've looked at those over priced tackle systems that the tackle monkey has tried to lure me into purchasing and I just can't see that they would really be any better than my homemade system and probably not as good for that matter.

Praise the Lord for the wisdom that has gone before us!
 

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If anybody needs 3-gallon square buckets with tight-fitting lids, let me know. The lids are awfully close to watertight and airtight, but I can't provide any certifications. I use one to hold one of the smaller bags of charcoal outside under the grill cover. Also got several stacked in the workshop with various sets of tools and workshop gear (one's full of clean rags, one's full of extension cords, etc).

Hope ya don't mind cat-litter documentation on the outside, and (clean) dust on the inside. I get another bucket every few weeks.

Oh yeah, one other thing I'd intended to add -- I've had to set myself some boundaries on useful stuff that I intend to scrounge. I try to have one 5-gal round bucket for scrap cut-off wood that still might come in handy, for example. If I can't stuff this next piece of "good" scrap into the bucket, I need to pitch something. That'll keep all my future-project-inventory collections from overrunning the place (if I can just adhere to my own rules).
 

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I won't admit to how many tackle boxes I own, but I never carry one fishing. Nothing can ruin a day like a spilled tackle box on a boat. I have everything packaged in zip locks and sorted in plastic jars.( I love the new quart plastic Duke Mayonnaise jars)This is all stored in a laundry bag. If fishing from bank -- laundry bag in a 5 gal bucket. Bucket serves as seat and to tote catch.:D
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Fresh Step buckets? I know the ones. Yes Sir, got some of those also. There is a lot of wisdom in the 5 gallon bucket method for wood scraps. A friend of mine basically does the same thing except it is 5 gal.per species. He grew up in his grandfathers workshop and makes his living out of it. It was originally his great grandfathers fertilizer/feed and seed store. Neat and full of old stuff. Loft full of old hardwoods.
Sundrop: many moons ago I made friends with a young Nags Head local who sorta lived on the pier. One day when the kingfishing just wasn't happening I got to trying my hand at bottom fishing. After a while of not having much luck I spy him coming out the pier with a spinning rod and a bucket. He came up sat down beside me and proceeded to work the spots over....what I've been here an hour and caught two fish and you've been here 5 min. and already caught 4.... "It's just now time" he said...5 fish or so later he asked "Where's your bait?" I showed him my pier bought shrimp and he sorta frowned and said "You shoulda bought the blood worms...they are always fresh and spot love'em. Here try some fresh shrimp" when I reeled in to change baits he saw the store bought rig and told me to take it off and he tied me a rig right into my fishing line using the hooks off my old rig and put a 2oz sinker on instead of a 3 and all of the sudden bottom fishing was fun. I still didn't match him fish for fish but I stayed close then. So now I pre-tie all mine in 12 and 30 with no hardware. I use several others tied with different hooks. I just tie a black snap swivel on my main line and snap the rigs on and off but I always keep my sinkers seperate so I don't have to carry so many. The ziplocks stay more compact also.
 

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I showed him my pier bought shrimp and he sorta frowned and said "You shoulda bought the blood worms...they are always fresh and spot love'em. Here try some fresh shrimp" when I reeled in to change baits he saw the store bought rig and told me to take it off and he tied me a rig right into my fishing line using the hooks off my old rig and put a 2oz sinker on instead of a 3 and all of the sudden bottom fishing was fun. I still didn't match him fish for fish but I stayed close then. So now I pre-tie all mine in 12 and 30 with no hardware. I use several others tied with different hooks. I just tie a black snap swivel on my main line and snap the rigs on and off but I always keep my sinkers seperate so I don't have to carry so many. The ziplocks stay more compact also.
Nothing beats a homemade hand tied rig! I've tried all the store bought stuff and still use a few of them from time to time but have much greater success with the homemade stuff without all the hardware. Thanks for sharing that sinker man!
 

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Nothing beats a homemade hand tied rig! I've tried all the store bought stuff and still use a few of them from time to time but have much greater success with the homemade stuff without all the hardware. Thanks for sharing that sinker man!
I can't remember the last time I used a store bought rig of any kind. For bottom rigs I use the same method that sinker man illustrated in another thread except that I make them on a continuos line of about 15 to 20 stored on cardboard in zip lock--simply cut one and tie hook and sinker size for conditions. You have to loose a few big ones on store bought terminals to wise up. Making your own rig raises the anxiety factor, which I find is a big part of fishing.:D
 
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Red X Angler
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I definitely want to start tying my own. I think it is also a good way to use up the odd leftovers from spools of line when there isn't enough to refill your reel. I'm sure the lack of harware makes it more attractive to the fish too.
 

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Funny, I remember when my Uncle Bill used them jam jars for all his stuff.
He'd screw the lid(s) to the bottom of his work bench and shelves in his garage and he'd have everything from nut's/bolts/fishin hooks/rubber bands... all that stuff.

he'd just unscrew the jar and get out what he needed.

He came from the ol' school Air Force when they used to holler commands like, "MOUNT" - "DISMOUNT", plus him being a retired motor pool guy,, he had all kinds of storage tricks and never threw anything away.. somethin always had a use for somethin. That man sure did love them old wood clothes hangers and them metal hooks they had...
 
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