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I was just curious how many rods most of you guys take out fishing. I would assume this varies on a few things, such as bank fishing vs boat fishing, etc.. I'll take 3 or 4 on the boat most times, but I struggle with how many I want to wrangle with when I'm on the bank.

SO how many do you take on the bank? On the boat? Etc.?

ME:

Boat: 4
Bank: 2
 

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Red X Angler
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If fly fishing I take one since that's all I've accrued thus far. If spin fishing I'll take 1-2 depending on where I'm at. I don't mind tying differ met baits on to keep my line fresh.
 

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Kayak fishing.... 2. Ultra light for crappie & bream, and a medium for bass/catfish.

Bank fishing.... 4. 2 ultra lights, one with casting bubble & fly, one with small hook for gulp cricket and/or gulp minnow, and 2 mediums - One t-Rigged for worms, one for lures.

boat fishin.... Well, I had a pontoon with 18 upright rod holders and a 4 rod trolling brace on the back, so everything went into that, up to and including the kitchen sink. Crappie poles, heavy catfish rods, mediums with sabiki rigs, bass rods, ultra lights, mediums rods, and a tackle box that weighed 30 pounds.
 

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Red X Angler
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Bank fishing, never more than 2, the size of which depends on the targeted species. I'd rather change lures a couple of times if need be than carry all those rods.
 

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3 most of the time. 5'10" Ultralight for small spinners and plastics, 7' med worm/speedcraw rod, 7' med for everything else (I use a snap-clip to switch cranks, top water, larger spinners, chatterbaits...)

Just started kayak fishing but it seems to work there too. If I'm pressed for time, I'll just take one.
 

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Good discussion here.

I 99% fly fish out of a canoe and take 2 rods. One is strictly a spare. Sucks to break your rod 2 miles into a 6 mile float without a spare. What sucks worse is loose or break your paddle and have no spare. Seen that one happen a couple of times.

for everything else (I use a snap-clip to switch cranks
tallastro, funny you mention that. When I have proven the fish aren't taking topwater, I put on a good size snap (minus the swivel) so I can change flies rapidly and for most subsurface flies, that loose connection gives much better action.
 

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I usually have about 15 in the boat, 7 or 8 on deck. Most of my rods are somewhat technique specific, I pretty much have a rod out for everything I plan to fish that day ready to go so I dont spend as much time changing lures. Some of those rods might only get picked up 2 or 3 times for a few minutes throughout the course of the day.
 

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Boat or bank, it's 4 for me. 1 ultralight for roostertail or small rapala, 1 med for topwater and 2 med 7' for all plastics (fluke, senko, craw, finesse, etc.)
Good inquiry. Interesting to read all the responses.
 

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Last weekend I had 6 rods on my kayak:

2 spinning rigs: one for drop-shot, one T-rigged.

4 casting rigs: one for deep cranks (7.10 cranking rod w/Revo Winch), one w/a buzz-bait, one T-rigged, and one general purpose that I typically swap (I use Sea Striker Fast Snaps) between a DT6 and a KVD 1.5 square-bill crank.

It sounds like a lot for a yak, but I got a system, and it works most of the time. Minimizes re-ties and lure changes. And I typically have a plan (e.g., work buzz-bait along a weed-line at this point in the lake, hit that point with deep crank and drop-shot, etc.), but of course open to "improvisation" as opportunities present themselves.

// joel
 
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Nearly always 2 that I intend to fish with; often have a spare left in the truck.
Expounding a little after reading some other replies...

I tend to fish a little on the light side most of the time but bring a rod rigged up for whatever the larger somewhat common fish are and throw that some of the time. For example, on local lakes and rivers I usually have a twisty tail grub on a UL I will throw 80% of the time and I will bring another rod rigged with a plastic worm, crank bait or some other offering that is targeting larger bass.

An exception to this is when I am in a catfishing mood; I may bring 3 rods or I may go with a medium set up that I use a snap on to switch between a grub and the other baits.

Similar strategy in salt water with a much heavier big rod.

The spare sometimes comes with in the yak, in which case it will likely be a push button Dock Demon (fits in practically no space and better than nothing if things go badly wrong with primary rods).
 

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One rod to the bank.

Wow do I feel puny. First I decide where I want to go. Then I decide what lures I think will work best for where I am going and what conditions are. Then narrow down from there which lures I want to bring most that will/kinda work with the one rod that matches the lures selected.

But for me it’s about the homework and priority is the brain massage. Catching is the happy ending.
 

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Red X Angler
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bank for bass 2
bank for trout 1 fly or spinner
bank for cats 4 if I am by myself
yak 4or5
boat 4or5

Darrell
 

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Bank fishing 2 maybe 3. Poking around in a jon boat on a pond maybe 4.

I can carry up to 10 rods on the yak, and have done so in tourney situations. Most of the time fun fishing its 6.. or 7... or 8.. I tend to carry a little more than necessary but I swear every time I leave a certain thing that's when I need it. Some days if I want to practice a certain technique I try and make myself bring a limited # so I can focus on it.

Like SpiderCrack I've developed a pretty simple system and I'm comfortable with being able to switch between rods. Also, like others have said my gear is pretty technique specific so that factors in too.
 
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