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When I first moved to North Carolina a friendly saltwater fisherman invited me to go "striper" fishing with him - I sort of knew what he was talking about. I told him that when I used to fish the Ohio River I would see guys catching massive "stripers" out in the middle of the river. He didn't seem to believe me, probably thinking that there was no way a "striper" was in the Ohio River. After some thought I realized I should have clarified - they called them "hybrids," though some guys called them "stripers." I guess they were a cross between a largemouth or white bass and a real striper. I just remember this one guy with a whole stringer of 10 pounders - wouldn't say it if I didn't see it. He had a 10 foot long rod and would cast this massive white and orange popper plug, which was followed by a teenie-little stick-type lure about - no kidding - 1 1/2" long into the middle of the river. They would gather a lot of attention because they had to rear WAY back and throw like a mortar to hit the middle of the river - where I know it was about 30' deep, near a dam. They would jerk that huge popper thing into a mess across the water and then BOOM one of those bass would hit that wee-little lure. Does anyone out there believe me???
 

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I grew up around the Ohio river and I had never heard much about the striper fishing until I went home on leave one year and a friend me along with him. Their kind of stiper fishing is a little different than the NC kind. The tailrace of the dams seem to be the target at time. Everyone guaged the best time to fish based on teh amount of water that was being released. The way everyone fished as I recall was to find as heavy a lure as possible to reach the middle of the river and so it would get swept downstream too quickly. It didn't have to be fancy either. My friend fashioned his plugs out of lead pipe. He would cut about 4 to 6 inches of pipe and smash both ends down with a hammer, then put a split ring on one end and a treble on the other and he was in business. I remember thinking that there's no way that would catch fish but after he pulled 6 nice stripers in about an hour I just decided to shut up and fish.
 

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He would cut about 4 to 6 inches of pipe and smash both ends down with a hammer, then put a split ring on one end and a treble on the other and he was in business. I remember thinking that there's no way that would catch fish but after he pulled 6 nice stripers in about an hour I just decided to shut up and fish.
Reminds me of rule number 1. Put your line into the water.
 

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The Hybrid Bass or Bodie Bass is an engineered species created for stocking purposes. It is a cross between a White Bass and a Striped Bass. They were engineered to be sterile, but there have been reports of hybrids crossing with pure bread stripers.

The hybrids are very easy to identify. They are much taller than stripers, and not as long. The most distinguishing feature is their lines or stripes. Just behind the pectoral fin, a hybrid's lines are broken, normally they drop down and continue down the lateral line.

Pound for pound, a hybrid is much stronger than a striper.
 

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i see this thread is 2+ years old, but if you are still listening----there are both stripers and wipers in the ohio river. i live in indiana and fish the markland dam pool from time to time. below dams are popular, but the locals tell me a prime wiper and striper area is about 3-4 miles below the dam.
jim
 
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