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Just wondering If anyone had any first hand experience with one. Don't have the means to haul or store a traditional ridged kayak. So I have been looking at some of the inflatable models I've seen on the market. Any info would be greatly appreciated.
 

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Because of my size, they weren't on my radar. They are very popular in Europe, where more people seem to have storage issues. But I buy and sell used sporting goods, and inflatable kayaks show up occasionally, so I've learned a little bit about them.

Buy quality.... You do not want to be miles from your put in when it sinks. Seyvolor, Intek, and Coleman are junk....The bottom end sea eagle is also junk. If you get more than 10-12 uses out of one of those, you're doing VERY well for yourself, or you've had a lot of luck.

You will spend as much for a durable inflatable kayak as you will for a quality fishing kayak.... The low end ones are not worth owning, IMO they will get you into a situation that they might not be able to get you out of.... Talk to someone who knows inflatables (I think danattherock has some knowledge, and read some of the reviews on Paddling.net)....

I understand the need, I'm just cautioning you that the products which might have caught your attention might be bad choices.
 
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Yeah, I almost bought the Farm in one...my buddy and I took one fishing for Lake trout....After landing a 20+ pounder
First thing...we didn't realize the wind...it blew us right into ice shardes....Some guy saw us waving...and towed us in...we both should have Died...it was 1 day after ice off.
Be careful water does not play.
 

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Yea, had a sea eagle. Used it for about a year, 20x maybe.. After that, i had like 3 small holes.. Get a hole while your out on the lake, and you will find a way to store and haul a real kayak. (ME) Got foam blocks, and a kayak the next weekend.
 
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Find a way to haul a regular yak. Get a rack or whatever you need and find somewhere to store it if at all possible. You'll be glad you did.


Sent from my kayak...
 

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Storing is a real problem for some...

I like in an apartment complex.... No room in my apartment would accomodate a kayak, and I can't store it outside. A storage unit is $40/month ($480/year) for outdoor storage... An inside storage unit large enough for a kayak would be at least $70/month.

I'm lucky my GF has a garage she lets me use. But if you don't have a house, it's very difficult to find a safe place to keep a kayak.
 
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I had one. They are a pain to put away. Trying to get all the air out, grass, sand and mud off and get it reasonably dry is not as simple as you might hope. They have their place. They are slower and often wetter but I did fish quite a bit off mine and wasn't sorry I had it. Wasn't sorry to see it go either...

Sent from my phone with TapaTalk
 

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Storing is a real problem for some...

I like in an apartment complex.... No room in my apartment would accomodate a kayak, and I can't store it outside. A storage unit is $40/month ($480/year) for outdoor storage... An inside storage unit large enough for a kayak would be at least $70/month.

I'm lucky my GF has a garage she lets me use. But if you don't have a house, it's very difficult to find a safe place to keep a kayak.
I concur. I would exhaust every possibility before writing it off though.


Sent from my kayak...
 

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Just wondering If anyone had any first hand experience with one. Don't have the means to haul or store a traditional ridged kayak. So I have been looking at some of the inflatable models I've seen on the market. Any info would be greatly appreciated.
I would strongly reccomend pack canoe over inflatable anything.

Gene - Red》X《 - Asheboro
 

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Everything has it's costs. The less you have the more it costs in some cases in more ways than one.
Whether you are buying a bass boat or a kayak. In some shape, form, or fashion, you will pay to play. 70 dollars a month for a storage unit if that is the only option is not that bad considering how many people will go out and without be dragged kicking and screaming spend 3+ grand on a PLASTIC boat + equipment.

What it boils down to is, if you want to get off the bank, how much you personally are willing to pay and for what.
 

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Does anyone have experience with those Point 65 Tequila modular kayaks? I was considering them but think I will go with something else. Never seeing one mentioned or photographed in the forum makes me skeptical.
 

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Does anyone have experience with those Point 65 Tequila modular kayaks? I was considering them but think I will go with something else. Never seeing one mentioned or photographed in the forum makes me skeptical.
One of my biggest reservations with them is cost. Add up the pieces and they aren't cheap. I have read about them in BTB (Beyond The Breakers) forums though. They aren't super popular, but because the back is complete sealed and the front has a bulkhead at your feet, they aren't just unsinkable; they perform almost normally when totally "swamped". Downside is that everything has to be either under a hatch or strapped to the deck. Only a little room for a daybag between your knees.
 

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You can purchase inflatables that are incredibly durable. I own 2 inflatable kayaks that will take about any reasonable abuse but they are for whitewater use and a real pain to paddle in flat water (they won't track worth a darn). Where you get into issues with the inflatables is that when they are made of materials that will last and resist damage they start costing $1000 or more. At that point you are well into the cost for a decent hard boat. They only make sense if storage is the biggest issue or you want something rubber to bounce off rocks in fast water.

If I had to purchase an inflatable for fishing right now I personally would lean toward the 1-man cata-rafts. They are drier as you are fully off the water, they have oar locks so you don't have to keep track of your paddle, and the tubes are less likely to be damaged because you are sitting on top instead of inbetween. As an added bonus I've seen these boats run class III whitewater with out issues.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
You can purchase inflatables that are incredibly durable. I own 2 inflatable kayaks that will take about any reasonable abuse but they are for whitewater use and a real pain to paddle in flat water (they won't track worth a darn). Where you get into issues with the inflatables is that when they are made of materials that will last and resist damage they start costing $1000 or more. At that point you are well into the cost for a decent hard boat. They only make sense if storage is the biggest issue or you want something rubber to bounce off rocks in fast water.

If I had to purchase an inflatable for fishing right now I personally would lean toward the 1-man cata-rafts. They are drier as you are fully off the water, they have oar locks so you don't have to keep track of your paddle, and the tubes are less likely to be damaged because you are sitting on top instead of inbetween. As an added bonus I've seen these boats run class III whitewater with out issues.
Something like this? http://www.amazon.com/Classic-Acces...qid=1365722823&sr=8-1&keywords=oswego+pontoon
 

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I have an Innova Twist. I got it for my company car trunk, since I can't take my hardshell with me on business trips. Used it once, and while it's not anything like fishing from my Jackson Coosa, it is very light (16 pounds) and will get me down the river or allow me to paddle through deep holes when wadiing and towing it behind. It tracks poorly, but otherwise handles very well. I would be reluctant to have that particular model as my primary yak, but a larger, more expensive one might not be that bad. For my purposes, so far, I am not sorry I purchased it, as it will allow me access to places I couldn't otherwise fish when on the road. Don't know about durability, yet, but it seems fairly tough.
 
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