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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Or what in the world were those monstrous booms last night? I heard 3. First was at 10:36pm second was at 11:20pm and third was between 12:20 and 12:30am. I talked to numerous people this morning at church that heard it too so it wasn't my neighbors etc. It was a loud boom that rattled off like thunder after the initial boom. Lets keep from talking about homemade explosives on this thread.
 

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Yeah as far as we know lol. I wish they would come back! There was talk for a while about bringing a concorde back for air shows etc.
You can actually find the list of every SR71 built. That list shows where each one is or whether it was lost. Most that were lost will tell the general vicinity. A couple just say lost.
It is one of my favorite aircraft. I'd love to see one fly again, but I doubt it will happen. Way to expensive to operate.
Even when they were briefly called back into service in the 90's, only 3 were activated I think. By then most of them were already gone wherever they were going anyway. But it was an incredible aircraft. The Russians couldn't match it.

I guess we have so many satellites now we can be just as effective from space. Probably more so with what those satellites can see or sense that we don't know about. You have to realize the SR71 was an OLD aircraft. Early 60's. 50 year old airplanes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Yeah it was an awesome plane! For those that don't know about it still holds the official speed record for crossing the United States coast to coast. 64 minutes. If you have some extra time this is a very interesting video. [video=youtube;o_Gyd6EYuXI]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o_Gyd6EYuXI[/video]
 

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Actually got to see one land when we were stationed in England. They made everyone who was not involved with unloading the cameras and sensors leave the area. From a long way off, you could still see the heat shimmer coming off the air frame.



:p
You have to realize the SR71 was an OLD aircraft. Early 60's. 50 year old airplanes.

We still have a few old birds that will outlive us all
Sky Cloud Aircraft Vehicle Airplane
Sky Vehicle Airplane Aircraft Mode of transport
 

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Read something a while back that the SR71 airframes were structurally sound after all those years and the extremes they flew. Probably had some to do with the hot cold cycling of the titanium.

I miss seeing all the C-130's also . There used to be so many of them that flew around the house. Many of them are sitting around with cracked wing boxes. Another OLD aircraft.
 

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I'm jealous of those that have actually got to see one fly. I'm just stoked I got to see a B-2 fly.

Seen that one fly but only fly.
I was told by someone that actually worked on the that aircraft way early on that it could land at Goldsboro but the taxi ways couldn't handle it. I think he was talking about the gear spread. These planes are getting some age on them as well.
They started this thing way back in the 70's. Used to hear about the flying wing crashes out in California in the news but not much more that . Back when they still sorting out how to make a wing fly with stability.
 

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Major Brian Shul is the author of Sled Driver, a fascinating account of his experiences as a pilot of the SR-71 Blackbird.

"In 1962, the first Blackbird successfully flew, and in 1966, the same year I graduated from high school, the Air Force began flying operational SR-71 missions. I came to the program in 1983 with a sterling record and a recommendation from my commander, completing the weeklong interview and meeting Walter, my partner for the next four years He would ride four feet behind me, working all the cameras, radios, and electronic jamming equipment. I joked that if we were ever captured, he was the spy and I was just the driver. He told me to keep the pointy end forward.
We trained for a year, flying out of Beale AFB in California , Kadena Airbase in Okinawa, and RAF Mildenhall in England . On a typical training mission, we would take off near Sacramento, refuel over Nevada, accelerate into Montana, obtain high Mach over Colorado, turn right over New Mexico, speed across the Los Angeles Basin, run up the West Coast, turn right at Seattle, then return to Beale. Total flight time: two hours and 40 minutes.

One day, high above Arizona , we were monitoring the radio traffic of all the mortal airplanes below us. First, a Cessna pilot asked the air traffic controllers to check his ground speed. 'Ninety knots,' ATC replied. A twin Bonanza soon made the same request. 'One-twenty on the ground,' was the reply. To our surprise, a navy F-18 came over the radio with a ground speed check. I knew exactly what he was doing. Of course, he had a ground speed indicator in his cockpit, but he wanted to let all the bug-smashers in the valley know what real speed was 'Dusty 52, we show you at 620 on the ground,' ATC responded. The situation was too ripe. I heard the click of Walter's mike button in the rear seat. In his most innocent voice, Walter startled the controller by asking for a ground speed check from 81,000 feet, clearly above controlled airspace. In a cool, professional voice, the controller replied, ' Aspen 20, I show you at 1,982 knots on the ground.' We did not hear another transmission on that frequency all the way to the coast."
 

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Before I joined the USAF, I was an aircraft mechanic and I actually went through A&P school with one of the test pilots of that aircraft. I used to ask him from time to time "Hey Rev, how high and how fast could that thing go?" with which he would reply "real high and real fast". That made me chuckle and gave him a smile.
It used to be seriously interested in that aircraft. Did a lot of research on it....way more capable than what is on public record.

DR, you say you saw a lot of Herc's with broken wing boxes??
 

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That's just the thing, I haven't seen them. So I started asking around....Where are my 130's? I was told there was a dozen parked at what was then Pope with cracked wing boxes. Most of the rest were over seas.

About the only time I see one now is when Bragg will have night jumps going on. You'll have 15 or so C17's with a maybe 2 C-130's in the formation. They swing down by Seymour turn and come right over the shop cleaning the bellies with pine needles.
I love that stuff.

Now the F-15's, I get a free airshow on almost a daily basis but it's nothing like pre 9/11. But again, they aren't garrisoned. They are scattered around the globe.
 

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It is still Pope...just not Pope AFB. It is Pope AAF now (Army Airfield). I am still stationed here...since 2001 :) I have done my fair share of airdrops from 130's and 17's and all them DZ's.
We still flew them 130's with the crack...just had to limit the cabin load from 30K down to 12K. Those were all the early H models. Now we are on J models
 

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Read something a while back that the SR71 airframes were structurally sound after all those years and the extremes they flew. Probably had some to do with the hot cold cycling of the titanium.
I had read the same thing. The temperatures generated at speed had the effect of annealing the airframe which removed any stress and would have provided a nearly limitless airframe life. Found link..

https://books.google.com/books?id=R...#v=onepage&q=SR-71 annealed airframes&f=false
 
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