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Anyone got ideas on how to mock a trailer up to carry about 4 or 6 kayaks? I've got some ideas in my head but would like some feed back and visuals if u gottem
Thanks
 

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Red X Angler
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I found this pic on the internet. Looks like a simple cheap utility trailer from somewhere like Harbor Freight tools with an extended tongue, uprights and crossbars that can be easily fabbed from metal/wood/pvc pipe.
How easy this is depends on how good you are with tools. I have wondered if there is a big enough market for these to try my hand at building something for resale myself...

Some Interesting Small Boat Trailers

added a link try that.......
 

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The Canoe/Kayak Livery nearby uses utility trailers with 2 metal uprights, and cross bars on each. Can't remember if they're welded or if they use the heavy duty threaded pipe/conduit. They can put up to two yaks on each "shelf", sideways, or 1 each top-down. I think they've got 4 levels, which means 8-16 boats. I'll see if I can get a picture.

Yak4fish has a commercially built kayak trailer - very sweet. Can launch/load directly off the back at a ramp. Not sure what his capacity is - would guess 4.
 

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I am about finished with my yak trailer. I will post some pictures tonight. I used a boat trailer, Pipe and Wood to make mine. The trailer was free and the rest cost me about 250 dollars. Pictures of it later today.
 

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Cool - looking forward to some homemade trailer pics. I use a rolling rack in the garage - makes loading/unloading there a breeze. Next step is to make launch&load easier (someday).

Here's a page for a commercial kayak/canoe trailer company. Mostly looks like mods to small boat trailers - plenty of ideas for do-it-yourself-ers...

Trailex Manufacturing and Trailer Sales
 

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Here's a small trailer I'm thinking of converting to carry my 14ft yak after I pick it up.

Harbor Freight Tools - Quality Tools at the Lowest Prices

The website has a downloadable manual for the trailer and with 3 extra extensions it can be made into a boat trailer.

What do y'all think? (Southern speak with a Canadian accent)

Kelley
 

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First thing I think is that you need a maple-leaf sticker for the prow of your red boat! :D

I really think the trailer approach has a whole lot of benefits. The only thing I'm concerned about is how it'll drive at highway speeds. Do we need to be concerned that it might be too light, and start bouncing? I don't know much about trailers...
 

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First thing I think is that you need a maple-leaf sticker for the prow of your red boat! :D

I really think the trailer approach has a whole lot of benefits. The only thing I'm concerned about is how it'll drive at highway speeds. Do we need to be concerned that it might be too light, and start bouncing? I don't know much about trailers...
Good idea on that Sticker. :rolleyes:

The thing about a trailer with an 860 lbs capacity is that there has to be some wieght and I don't think one yak alone would be enough. Ballast may be required.

The reason is that the springs wouldn't feel the weight and it would be like putting the yak on a trailer with no springs at all. :eek:

Kelley
 

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Red X Angler
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That will work but know the tounge will be too short so you will have to lengthen it first. Unless you add the kit you mentioned and then be sure to measure and allow. Fix a storage box on the tounge and the additional weight helps keep it straight on the road. Remember to always load tounge heavy and tail light so it doesn't sway at speed. You'll get bounce no matter what short of overloading the trailer, so keep that in mind when you build it. Cushion the yak mounts and make sure you have plenty of straps to secure things to allow for the bounce.
 
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If you use PVC (as I did), the horizontal pieces can be strengthened by using 1.25" PVC and running smooth steel pipe that's used for chainlink fencing through it. If you use some pop rivets every 18 inches or so the pipe and PVC become "laminated" into an extremely strong piece of tubing without adding a lot of weight. I modified a utility trailer to carry kayaks on top of a small power boat (Gheenoe with a 10HP) under. I can get 4 kayaks on top by pushing it a bit. The cross pieces are about 4.5 ft long and don't flex at all. I can provide a photo if it would help. Im took it on a tour of Florida from northern NC in Dec. and it worked perfectly.
 

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let's see it!
done! I also included a rack I designed and built for my small pickup.
the pickup rack is secured to the chassis tie-down points with ratchet tie-down straps. I'm sure the web straps would work but I replaced the webbing with Stainless cable. The rack is going no-where.
On the trailer set-up, I designed the corner posts that extend above the kayaks to be removable. That way I don't have to lift the kayaks as high. They're secured in place with clevis pins, retained by some chain so I can't loose them.
 

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I suggest reinforcing the horizontal, load bearing members with steel tubing. 1.25" PVC and smooth steel pipe that's used for chain-link fencing fit together snug and with some pop rivets every 18" or so becomes very strong, but is still light weight.
 
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