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How do you do it? Does anyone have fishable gloves? Saw some neoprene gloves at NSS that seem pretty nice. I also believe that if you wear warm enough gear and keep your core warmer your extremities stay warmer.
 

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I use Mechanix gloves. The pair I have been using the past few years was made leaving the thumb, fore and middle fingers exposed... they were marketed as gloves for framing houses. Mechanix discontinued them and redesigned them, the new ones are probably alot better for framing but not as good for fishing. I am going to experiment with clipping the fingers of the original mechanix gloves and see how that works. They are not some super insulated glove but they block the wind and hold in some heat and I dont lose any feel or add bulk to my hands. When it comes to staying warm, I use the less is more approach, I dont want my hands or body to get too warm, if you get too warm you sweat which makes you wet and wet makes you colder. If I am taking a long boat ride I will put on some fluffy insulated gloves that cover my entire hand. Whatever you decide on, carry several pairs incase one gets wet

 

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I've recently purchased and began using fingerless wool gloves and some of you may have seen in my trip reports. They work great. Fingers still get cold when they're wet if it's extremely cold though. Maybe the mitt style where you can alternate would be handy in this scenario. I favor the fingerless for tying flys and feeling the line though mostly. This post may be irrelevant if your a total spin fisherman.


Sent from my kayak...
 

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only thing i've ever found worked is the cheap small cotton gloves and bring multiple pairs... as one gets wet pull another pair out of a warm pocket and go again. anything warm and water proof is usually bulky. i use a pair of tight fiting rubber mechanics gloves that work ok but only the finger tips and palms are water proof not the backs of them.
 

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I don't wear gloves while actually fishing, only while running the boat. For those, I wear a pair of insulated rubber gloves made and sold for commercial fishermen. They are large and slip on and off with ease. IF my hands get cold (rarely ever happens) I will stick them in my pockets for a minute or two and get back to it.

As far as an insulating material, I highly recommend a good pair of merino wool base layers. You'll spend $100 for a decent midweight top and bottom (most you need in eastern NC) but the money is well worth it.
 

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I just fish at Belews and if my hands get cold I dip them in the water and dry them quickly. (that's only halfway tongue in cheek)

I have been trying some runners gloves my wife bought me with the fingers clipped but I have not really tried to fish with them on for any length of time. I just fish till my hands get cold, then take a break to warm them up and keep on going. I wear ski gloves when driving the boat.
 

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I use a hand muff like these:

http://www.cabelas.com/category/Mens-Handwarmer-Muffs/104041080.uts

I put a hand warmer inside and either wear it around my waist or clip it somewhere on the boat. I can't fish with gloves. The hand warmers are really, really warm and thaw out your fingers quickly. Was out on Norman saturday with 25 degrees and 30 mph winds to start. My setup did pretty well.

When I drive I have neoprene duck hunting gloves made for complete submersion. They work great except when you need to use a touchscreen.
 

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I sell a lot of fingerless fleece and wool gloves, as wademaster mentioned. Also sell a good many pair of "flip mitts" either by Simms or Chota. The mitt feature offer more warmth but tends to be a little bulky and can snag on stuff. The Chota neoprene gloves have been really nice for driving the boat and handling stuff around the water....but don't offer exposed finger tips for dexterity and knot tying. When your pull the neoprene glove off, your moist hands chill pretty quick. On a bad day, I like to keep a couple of the handwarmer packets in my jacket pockets so I can slip hands in there for a quick warm up. The packets will heat pretty well for quite a few hours. You can also buy larger heat backs called body warmers...

Several years ago, there were some fleece pouches on the market which would attach around your wrist. You could then put a handwarmer packet in each pouch on the inside of each wrist. They worked great. Although they did add some warmth, the main concept was to "trick" your body into maintaining an increased blood flow to the hands. As roostertail mentioned, the body diverts warm blood from hands and feet to keep core organs and brain warm. The heat packets on the inside of the wrists helped maintain increased blood to the hands. I found them to be really nice, as did several guides, and golfers. I don't think the fleece pouches are available any more....but I have seen some gloves and mitts with a pouch on the inside of the wrist for heat packs. There are probably several options that could be contrived to hold a heat pack there...without letting bare skin come in contact with the heat pack and run the risk of a burn. Some tight fitting jacket cuffs interfere with heat packs on the wrist.
 

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I bought some cheap fingerless wool/poly blend "gloves/mitts" (not sure you can really call them either). They have a thumb hole and just barely cover the first knuckles. I also make sure my jacket front pockets are available for my hands. Not just try to; if it is really cold, the pockets are a must. Hard to beat belly heat. :) I got a black (makes a difference even when it seems like the sun is providing little warmth) insulated all weather jacket from BPS that I usually wear.
 

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I use hot hands inside a pair of brooks running gloves. They're thin, but rated to 40 degree weather and w/ the hot hands my hands are plenty warm. This has worked for me as cold as 25 degrees. I like these b/c i can still cast my baitcaster and still have a good feel of the spool that I don't get w/ thicker gloves. Also, they are quick drying/water resistant which is a big plus.
 

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I've done quite a bit of wintertime and cold weather fishing and tried multiple styles over the years. My thoughts are....

Cotton - Only in emergencies
Cotton with a rubber glove on top - Bulky and not any warmer because the cotton still gets wet.
Neoprene - I don't like them. They feel too tight and I can feel moisture building up under the glove. They make me feel colder after a while.
Fleece - Good backup pair, but pretty worthless when wet.
Cabela's Guidewear - Pretty good glove. They stop the wind but aren't water proof. I have the glomitts and the thumb is annoying. Overall my second favorite
Ragg Wool - My absolute #1 all-time favorite. They stay warm when wet aren't too bulky. I'll only take them off if they are soaking wet.

Style - I definitely like 1/2 finger gloves over glomitts but own both kinds.
 
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