NC Angler Forums banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,810 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Referencing my recent exploits at Ft. Fisher (http://www.ncangler.com/forums/f3/kfnc-meet-greet-early-report-fort-3854.html)...

If it was a cobia, you might be glad he didn't get into your net still alive. Never go to a gunfight with a knife! Cobia with life still in them have been known to rearrange a few things on a boat or a person.
Been thinking about that adage... I of course was not looking particularly for this gunfight, not sure I could have avoided it without sacrificing the fishing I was looking for... So... knowing the limits of my knives, when I wound up in a gunfight, what should I have done better?

Should I set a more sane time limit for playing a fish? If it's not showing definite signs of weakening after x-number of minutes, I oughtta cut him free? Or should I factor in identifying the fish (or hooked critter of whatever genus), again with a clause that if it remains unseen after x-number of minutes, I probably don't want to see it?

I'm not sure I want to add a fighting gaff to my rig right now... I was considering (even before this) that my next combo was gonna be one step more stout than what I've been using. Perhaps that would have allowed me to put a bit more oomph on this guy and worn him down sooner.

What's the common thinking? There's always a limit to the fight you're prepared to get into...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,131 Posts
Well I used that adage regarding your net. I was just thinking the net might not be a good idea for a live cobia. I use a standard gaff but because I'm in a 19CC and it doesn't have a fish box big enough for most cobia to go in while still alive, I keep him outside the boat till dead. I have another gaff that is on a line instead of a stick - I re-gaff him by hand with that and tie him off to a cleat. The danger there is it might attract sharks but I've never had that problem so far. Not sure I would chance it in a yak though.

As to fighting the fish, it sounds like you did fine up to the point you towed the yak (and that was understandable). You can catch a mean fish on tackle rated at less than 20% of it's weight - my 100 plus pound hammerhead last week on 20 pound tackle is proof of that. It's the end game (net) that elicited my comment.
 

·
Red X Angler
Joined
·
16,054 Posts
That's a tough call !! I'm of the mindset that I don't give until I land it, it cuts me off, or runs me outta line !!! I guess in a kayak that's not feasible, I guess I'd go with a time limit if sight unseen, or a line limit and then crank the drag down harder until he gives or the line does....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
493 Posts
Hey Lefty, I'm with sundrop on this one. I never hooked a fish I didn't want to get close enough to make the decision at the boat. Then, if it is not what I expected, I'd cut it off. If it hasn't budged, I would tighten her down until the fish or the line gave in. I had a 40 lb ray a couple of weeks ago at Oregon Inlet that stripped off almost all my line. I walked around in an arch, cutting the distance down and reeling in the slack. Once I started playing the fish, pulling and reeling, giving some line, then taking it back, he wore out and I was able to retrieve almost all of my line. That pull lasted over a 1/2 hour and my arms felt like putty. But, I saw it, I saved my line, and had great fun in the wrestling match.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,766 Posts
Lefty, hindsight is supposedly 20-20 but we both know better. From what I read you were doing real well for someone who hasn't been there and done that a few times. landing a big fish from a kayak takes more correct decisions and reactions than from anyother platform. The trick is wearing out a fish that can pull that boat around for the rest of his life. The only solution is to create more drag or if you have the line capacity... to bail out in shallow water or on shore. The trick to landing big fish on seemingly to light of tackle is to let him make his 1st run on a light drag. When he has run out of steam then you need to put more pressure on him and try and gain back as much line as you can. Each time he runs you put a little more pressure on him and try to get back as much line as possible. If you do this and work up to 50% of your lines breaking strength and he is still making runs then is the time to consider him either food or free. If you aren't going to kill him you might as well try to get as close as you can and cut the line. Now about the creating drag part... that's situational. Probably your best bet would have been to drag something like a flowtroll bait bucket initally and then and then after you realized that it was big and bad decide on whether to deploy some real drag on your boat or try and make a dash for shallow water. Things that you can use to put the brakes on your boat with are #1 a drift chute #2 a weighted anchorline. (Top three picks... al's kayak anchor:)....4' of anchor chain.... window sash weights) Way back in the pack.....a commercial anchor and somwhere in between ....a surf weight tied onto that other rod I know you had with you. Lay the rod down and put your leg on it to keep the angle of pull low and inline with the axis of the boat.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,766 Posts
The anchor pictured is actually the johnboat version. The tines are made up of copper wire so they will straighten out before you get enough pressure on them to get you in trouble and you can straighten them before deployment if you just want to put the brakes on a little. Instructions for making your on are somewhere on site.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,810 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks, Sinkerman, I do remember that anchor project. We discussed deploying my anchor (I've got a 1.5lb folding claw) but decided that the way he was running under the boat, we were afraid he'd be likely to tangle in the anchor line.

The idea behind towing me was to bring me shallow. We'd been watching on the depthfinder that he was keeping me in 3-5 feet of water, and he was real careful to not come more than about 2' to the surface. So we were thinking that if we could drag him into less than 2' of water, we'd at least increase our chances of getting a net around him. Dumb (and tired) me decided to change two variables at once and hold the spool (tighten drag) while the tow was in progress.

Thanks for the thoughts guys!
Kevin
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top