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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was just wondering how many Live Bait fishers we have on the site? I use both live and artificials as needed but most certainly prefer live bait. I am in the process of trying my hand at worm farming and am thinking of stocking some minnows and crickets perhaps.

I am currently setting up an old building to act as a Bait Store so to speak at my home. This is basically my go at live bait extended handling and keeping.

Anyone with expertise in keeping bait alive would be a wonderful asset to me.

Anyone like to swap some stories or tips about live bait fishing adventures?

Irish
 

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Many moons ago when I lived up near the Eno river, I use to raise rabbits and worms on a small farm. It was a great combination: I fed the rabbits, they fed the worms (their droppings). The worms fed the fish. And on a really good day, the fish fed ME.
 

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Hampsteads right on with that one. Rabbits make good worm farmers and their "fertilizer" won't burn plants like most. By the way you can sell your used worm bedding to local gardeners. It is a great fertilizer and soil conditioner. You might find that you can sell "soil amendments" to your live bait customers. Also if you have room for them you might want to plant a few catalpa trees . They grow fast and will start producing a supply of catalpa worms in about 3 or 4 yrs. These are a good drawing card as many people will drive a good ways out of the way to get them. There are a few sites on the internet detailing how to farm crickets and worms. I have had similar thoughts but you need a good location to support the volume I needed and there is already an established bait farmer in my vicinity. I decided that I wasn't as inclined due to the lack of potential customers and established competion so close by. A smaller operation like you are talking about would be a good outlet for fresh home grown organic vegetables.You could grow them yourself or work out an arrangement with someone in the vicinity.(Possibly someone who is buying your "soil amendments".) A combinatioin of growers might be the best way. Well I'd better give you a break. Don't want to turn you into a one man superstore! Good luck! I hope this works out the way you envisioned. Al
 

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I guess it's a good thing that I'm not in the rabbit and worm business. The way my fishing has been going lately, I would have to eat the rabbits.:D
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hey, thanks eveyone for the inputs. I certainly do appreciate them. My operation will most likely turn out to be a project that myself and Grandkids work, although I am not at all beyond selling a few worms, crickets, minnows or any other live bait to my fisher friends.
My are ais without any live bait farmers as far as I know. We have a store that sells it but never have seen any large scale operations.
Anyway, thanks to everyone and Please don't eat the rabbit unless I can partake also. LOL
Tight Lines fellas!
Irish
 

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I too, helped my dad raise earthworms years ago. My dad used a frame about the size of a mortar box...as a matter of fact, I think it was a mortarbox...anyway, he had ordered a few redworms from an ad in the back of a Popular Science magazine and tilled the soil, adding some corn meal for food and kept it covered so the soil would stay moist and cool. He said that feeding them kept them from wandering off...and it worked. We always had a good supply. We also used a telephone generator to find 'em in the wild. Occasionally found a colony of night crawlers 12" to 14" long and great for bass, by shuffling the leaves on a river bank.

The catalpa worms are a great bait too. I had noticed over the past 10 years the "toggle worms" as they were called in South Carolina, were on the wane...but was happy to find a tree full this summer on the White Oak river...right at the boat landing. (Thank you Jesus). I once saw a guy fishing off the 2nd Ave fishing pier in Myrtle Beach...."you gotta turn 'em inside out with a wooden match" he said...and he was catching spots with his secret bait!
 

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I have raised worms at my house and they are not hard if you have a place to keep them cool and no predators. Start out small with a large box w/ no bottom. Add 3"thick layer of dirt Add old blanket add dirt add news paper then dirt then news paper. Wet and add worms. Feed worms and that is all it takes use veg. scraps from the table and there is no need for anything else. Nature will take over. You will have all the worms you will ever need by next year.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks!

Thanks Zach!
The small worm bed we have now seems to be doing well. They are turning the bedding material into a nice dark color. Wife is hoping for some potting materials real soon now.
Granddaughter and I make branch out to a larger bed in a few weeks. So will give yours a try probably.
Appreciate the information!
Irish
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I really appreciate eveyone who has responded!
I am having a ball doing this with my 7 year old Grand-Daughter that wife and I are raising. Hopefully the other 6 Grandkids will want to become involved also.
I will let everyone know throughout the year of our progress and if you are in the Denton area, and we have worms, then stop by and grab a free box.
Irish
 
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