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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I read a NC sportsman article about red drum. It covered several aspects of fishing for red drum. One in particular caught my interest. The author was catching drum in a shallow area. Another guide was fishing with him and was using a topwater plug with holes removed as a popping cork. He got a fish and lost it as the fish cut the line on an oyster. The line was cut ahead of the plug so the drum was able to be tracked for several days by locating the plug. This showed the fish moving into the shallower area during high tide and then into holes close by when the water went out.
I've been wondering where the drum that I catch and miss or release go when the bite shuts off so I am going to try this. For scientific purposes only-wink.
Can't wait to hear the flaming.
Read the article.

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I just dont see how the fish will go into a "normal" pattern with this..He obvioulsly wont be able to feed so i dont think you will get a very accurate reading idk
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
No I'm not going to do this. I was just throwing it out there to see what kind of roaming I'd receive
It's a real article in NC sportsman:
http://www.northcarolinasportsman.com/details.php?id=181

"During several fishing trips, I watched my friend and fellow fishing guide, Graham Willis, chasing a drum that he fitted with an accidental tracking buoy,” Dietzler said. “He had hooked a red drum using a mullet fished with a float rig. The ‘float’ was a silver Top Dog with the hooks removed. The fish had broken the line and could be tracked along the same 100-yard stretch of bank every day by finding the lure.

“The other fish in the school stayed with that one, so we always knew where the school was located. It proved red drum use the same places every day.”

So here is a large and we'll respect fishing magazine that publishes this, "technique". I am 100% sure that most members here would get lampooned if they mentioned trying this.
I'll admit that I don't see it is a big deal. I've lost plugs to fish more than a few times and it happens to all of us. If it happened to me the way the article describes, and I could actually see and follow the float then why not? To do it intentionally? I'm undecided about how I feel. One one hand I think it would be interesting and fun. I don't feel it would likely harm the fish and I don't think the fish would change its behavior with a hook in it. Fish are about surviving day to day and they are remarkable at doing so. I caught a drum that was in a large school and it was missing nearly it's entire back half. I've got a picture of it too. On the other hand it seems a little like cheating and has some chance of being called cruel or abusive. Not by me but by others and I have to consider the opinion of others when thinking something through.
Then I just do it my way

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Have heard about the speckled trout tracking, and actually caught one at the Fig 8 bridge that someone tied fishing line through a hole in the fishes back to a drink bottle. Fish was skinny and sickly looking, disgusting!
 

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I find it interesting. Might do the same on some river bass to see how far they move with colder weather. Just try to grab the fish you tag after a couple of days and throw him on the grill or release him from the study.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I have been getting nowhere in trying to find out how wide spread this type of "tracking" is. I think there is too much room for mistreatment of the target. The plastic bottle is a good example of this.
This is just a guess but it would seem to me that attaching any buoyant material to a fish would hinder the swimming ability.
Maybe if there was a scientific way to attach something that would release itself (dissolve?) in two or three days could work?
My big question is why has all the info I've found mention crappie as the target fish? I don't know anything about crappie so maybe someone can tell me why this is used on them?

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with all the electronics on boats today, i dont see the need for any ameture tracking of fish, im not the best at figuring out how to catch em but it is a lot of fun learning from this forum and what little advice i get from it. just my 2 cents
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Accidental tracking buoy is different than intentional fitting a fish a float that may get wedged between oysters.
Or losing a topwater lure with a hook that will rust out.

Adding a new low to the sport of fishing.
You get my vote for SportsMan of the Year. …….. ICM
I am not clear who this is directed at or the implication of the post but, just to clarify my previous post, I am not in favor of this practice. As I mentioned there is too much room for mistreatment of the fish and getting anything attached to a fish caught up on structure such as oysters is a good example. I see no way to attach anything that would tether a visible device to a fish that isn't asking for trouble and potential harm. Even a super light hook, line and float that could be considered as safe in preventing such tangles etc isn't safe in my eyes at this point the. If some experts in this field, such as marine biologists, were to come out with a short term tracking method along the lines of this floating marker I'd be happy to try it. At this point I'd say no way.

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I have also heard of people catching a fish and hooking a small hook into the fin with a balloon or bobber attached for finding the school and I've caught a trout which this was done too. I don't know how long the fish had been hooked but dang do some people really want to do this??????
 

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I went out with Spec fever guide service last summer.

We encountered a red drum which was attached to a hook with a popping cork on it.

The charter captain followed the popping cork around, and we tracked the school. The captain was trying to hook the cork so that he could release the fish.... But every time his lure hit the water, another drum would grab it, and it would be fight on.

We already had our keeper limit for the day by the time he was able to snag the popper, and unhook and release the drum.

Method did work great, until we did freed him.
 
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I have also heard of people catching a fish and hooking a small hook into the fin with a balloon or bobber attached for finding the school and I've caught a trout which this was done too. I don't know how long the fish had been hooked but dang do some people really want to do this??????
It baffles me as well. This practice may be more widespread than I'd have ever thought. Maybe people that do this are just silent about it?
I wonder if it is legal?
How would someone figure out the length of the line, size of the float and so on? Intentionality attaching a long string and float is really new to me. Finding it in a large publication was a surprise because it had to prompt some people to try it out. They should have edited that segment of the article out imo.

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