NC Angler Forums banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
From what little I know, it seems the proper method for fishing live bait on Carolina rig, you basically fish right next to the boat while anchored. However after 30 minutes or so of slow fishing, I will start casting out some and drag back to boat and start re tying rigs. I will pick one up ever so often like this but looking for a better way.

I also put out a lite line for Spanish and one day the birds keep stealing my lite line baits so started hooking thru bottom near the vent which causing the bait to swim down some instead of staying on top. I ended up catching a keeper flounder on the lite line that day.

This got me thinking, by using a sliding float with a stopper on line where it keeps the bait 3' or so off the bottom, you could cover a lot of water while anchored without getting hung near as often. I only get out a couple of times a year, but haven't seem anyone trying this yet and figured there is probably a good reason.

So, what do ya'll think, anyone ever try this?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,379 Posts
The absolute best way to fish the reefs for flounder is by power drifting and fishing vertical. You're using your motor, usually in reverse to hold position on the structure whether it be a ledge or a reef ball. Watch your depth finder and when you pick up a fish mark that spot. I don't know about all units but Lowrance only requires a double tap of the enter button to mark a waypoint. If you catch one flounder from that spot, there are others. Keep working the area. Make sure you keep your baits as vertical as possible and you won't hang up near as much.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
525 Posts
Nearshore Flounder

I appreciate your creativity, however there are much easier ways to catch nearshore flounder. Most importantly, your bait (or lure) has to remain in contact with the bottom and a 35'-45' slip cork arrangement that leaves the bait 3' off the bottom is pretty much a waste of time. The good 'ol Spro bucktail tipped with a 4" Berkley Gulp! shrimp is hard to beat. Any color works, but white is best. If you are unsure as to the size of the bucktail you need to use, you can't go wrong with the 2 oz. size but I like to go as light as possible while still maintaining bottom contact. Flounder don't like high bottom relief, so concentrate on the concrete rubble and pipes at the local AR's (285, 315, 320, and 330) and steer clear of the airplanes, boats, and bridge debris found there. Drift, don't anchor, and use a drift sock if the wind, tide, and current move you too fast. Simple, easy, and effective.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,497 Posts
Dang good advice spot on :)

I appreciate your creativity, however there are much easier ways to catch nearshore flounder. Most importantly, your bait (or lure) has to remain in contact with the bottom and a 35'-45' slip cork arrangement that leaves the bait 3' off the bottom is pretty much a waste of time. The good 'ol Spro bucktail tipped with a 4" Berkley Gulp! shrimp is hard to beat. Any color works, but white is best. If you are unsure as to the size of the bucktail you need to use, you can't go wrong with the 2 oz. size but I like to go as light as possible while still maintaining bottom contact. Flounder don't like high bottom relief, so concentrate on the concrete rubble and pipes at the local AR's (285, 315, 320, and 330) and steer clear of the airplanes, boats, and bridge debris found there. Drift, don't anchor, and use a drift sock if the wind, tide, and current move you too fast. Simple, easy, and effective.
 
  • Like
Reactions: papadave and dbeam
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top