NC Angler Forums banner
1 - 20 of 26 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
106 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have never kayaked and fished at the same time. I have rented some and went out for excercise but never fished. It always seemed fun and a cheaper version of a boat, just with less place. What type of kayak should you get, is there much space? It just seems like space would be a major issue.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
You've come to a great place to learn, from folks with a lot more experience than me. I was in the same place as you a couple of months ago. You probably want a sit on top kayak. There are lots of them out there in a variety of price ranges. Most will carry a fair amount of gear. I can carry three rods, a tackle box, and a bait bucket pretty easily. Again, some of the folks here have lots more experience than I do, so you're sure to find the help you need. Good luck!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,911 Posts
I agree with actaylor - SOTs have lots of flat surfaces for mounting accessories, plus the tankwell for hauling tackle, coolers, bait buckets, etc... I also run with 3 rod holders, plus a fish finder on the deck, plus a crate in the tankwell and sometimes a bait bucket too. You've also got internal storage in the bow - extra clothes, food, camping gear, and such. You can't exactly get up and walk around the boat, but they're easy to store, easy to haul and easy to move in the water.

Here's a pic of the topsides of mine:


A recreational Sit-Inside Kayak can be a much more claustrophobic experience depending on model and size. They can be much, much tippier, but also much faster (skinny+long = fast = touring). They can (and often do) make decent fishing platforms, but their really made for paddling, where the SOTs are really made for fishing.

One man's (biased) opinion... Glad to answer any specific questions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,810 Posts
Although you can't get up and walk around the boat, getting out to wade actually is as easy as getting up. That's another advantage of the sit-on-tops -- incredibly easy in and out. And if you tip, you don't have to learn to "wet exit" or eskimo roll, you and the boat will simply part ways. Getting back onto the boat in deep water (above standing depth) is a specialized skill, but once you've done it, you don't have to bail the boat like you'd have to bail a sit-inside or a canoe.

If you can make it to the Raleigh area next Thursday, Great Outdoor Provision Co. is having a demo event at Lake Crabtree. Call them and let them know what you're looking for and they can bring it. Or Paddle Creek up at the Falls dam can arrange demos any day for a small fee (applicable to a boat purchase).
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,911 Posts
The other big benefit of the SOT is that they are self-bailing - any water that gets into the cockpit or the tankwell can drain out through the scupper holes. You have to pump or dump any water from a SIK. Not usually a problem in either one on flatwater, much more interesting proposition in the ocean. You can skirt a SIK, but again you create more space & mobility problems.

Anyway, I bought the story hook, line and sinker, and I've kept mine in the water a lot since I started.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
146 Posts
Younggun: Good advice already given by others, sit on top is the best way to go for the yak fishing. If you are used to fishing from a conventional boat, kayak fishing will require some adjustments in the way that you fish and the gear that you carry. And the wind will become your enemy moreso than in a regular boat. Kayak fishing will open up new opportunities to fish areas that are not accessible by most boats. And it's good exercise to boot.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,911 Posts
Hey Jeffonc, that's a nice looking portable kayak storage rack on wheels. You got a design plan for that? been considering building something similar for my 2 yaks.
Thanks. It wasn't so much something I designed as something that fell into my lap at the right time. In its former life it had been a rotisserie for my dad's frame-off car restoration project. A little vertical re-jiggering of the cross members and viola - an incredibly overbuilt, if not handsome, rolling kayak rack - should be good for a couple thousand pounds worth of yaks! Here's a few different views:

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,766 Posts
Younggun, here is a different view. Sit on tops are nowhere near as versatile as a decent sit inside with a large cockpit opening. That is my opinion. I guess you need to fish them both to see thru the fog. Buy what you think will work for you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,183 Posts
Younggun, here is a different view. Sit on tops are nowhere near as versatile as a decent sit inside with a large cockpit opening. That is my opinion. I guess you need to fish them both to see thru the fog. Buy what you think will work for you.
I am an SOT person myself, but sinker's quote brings Hisheirs to mind: He has exactly what is described and he actually looks more comfortrable. He can lean back and paddle or fish, whereas an SOT-er has to sit up straight all the time. He doesn't seem to have any space problems either, as his is a 2 person sit-in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,810 Posts
And you can see what Fojoloy accomplished yesterday with his sit-inside.

It all goes back to rule #1 -- get your line into the water.

You can spend a year (or more) debating which way to go. Don't. Don't try to find "the best" answer -- find some number of "good enough" answers and then pick whichever of those that you want -- doesn't matter which one at that point. Test-drive as much as you can, but don't wait months for those opportunities.

You will not have a 30-year mortgage on this boat -- if you fish it for a year or two and decide you want to switch for whatever reason, that ought to be a realistic opportunity.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,766 Posts
I've fished a keowee 2 from perception for many yrs. It is a two seater but fishes better with one person. Everything is in front of me when I'm fishing and I have never even wished for rod holders, much less a milk crate. Depth finder? I've weighed the pro's and cons and decided that I'd stick with my current method. (rod and reel) It only finds hungry fish. (Which is what you are looking for.) Looking at a depthfinder screen takes your eyes off of the water. If there are feeding fish nearby normally you will be able to determine that without a depthfinder/fish finder. In deep lakes sometimes a depth finder would be nice. I have found that deep lakes are generally not "the place" to really get the most enjoyment out of kayak fishing. I'd rather be where there are no jetskis and waterskiers. (not always possible to avoid all of that in the saltmarsh though.) Not only is the fishing generally better in those type places but the wildlife viewing opportunites are better. The "fishing kayak" (according to the marketers) is one that needs all sorts of "rigging" which they are happy to provide at your expense of course. It is hard to tell people the opposite is true when they have been exposed to the "system". Only by fishing both will you be sure of what is best for you. If you plan on going out in the ocean it is definitely not a Keowee 2. All boats have limitations and most have strong points. It is more of a matter of what fits your specific needs best.
 

·
Red X Angler
Joined
·
16,054 Posts
For a teenager on a tight budget ( I assume).. I'd watch Craigslist.com and buy something inexpensive and learn with it. Then when i really got into it and had some $$ saved up I'd upgrade. Keep it simple at first, 2 rods and a small cooler, you can carry basic tackle in your vest.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Younggun

·
Registered
Joined
·
106 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks alot guys. Your right sundrop tight budget. Id much rather spend money on a kayak than a purse for my gf. What you said helps out alot. Ill just go out this weekend or next at looking at some
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
852 Posts
I had the opportunity to try one a couple weeks ago. It had some good points, but this particular one also had some bad ones, particularly the seat. By the end of a couple hours of fishing it felt like I had worn all the skin off my tail bone. It was also not easy to get into or out of without practically falling over in the water. This was a 14' sit on top yak.

It was pretty stable for fishing while seated, although reaching behind the seat to get at the tackle box or rod in one of the holders did not feel very stable.

It may have been, and probably was just that particular yak, but I would not choose anything similar to that one. Look for one with a comfortable layout for you and nicely padded seat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,810 Posts
Seats are an important factor in a yak. You spend a lot more time there than you do in most boats. So it's very much worth being critical of the seat -- and if you have a chance to take a test-drive for several hours, all the better.

Reaching behind you can indeed be uncomfortable. Sometimes I turn sidesaddle if I know I'm going to rummage back there for more than just a moment. I did extend my flush-mount rod holders so that they were not so low and tight behind me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,993 Posts
Only thing I can find wrong with my Pungo 12 sit in, is that when my live well (laundry bag in tow) gets filled with fish --it is hard to paddle.:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,810 Posts
When I grow up I want to catch as many fish as Forrest. :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,766 Posts
One thing is for certain not one boat made will suit everybody. I have loaned my Keowee 2 to people to fish out of while I fished out of my Chinook (A large touring kayak). within an hour most of them were talking about how much easier the sea kayak looked to paddle. Most actually thought they were getting a bum deal. I generally let them get the feel for the keowee 2 and learn how to manuever & fish out of it. Then later in the day when I'm sure they think that they would be better off fishing out of the touring version; I offer to swap.
So far everyone has jumped at the chance and thought that would be the better boat. Trust me ....it is comical to watch people trying to figure out how to turn and manuever it...much less fish out of it. Most never stay in it more than 15 min. because all of the sudden things feel tippy and straight ahead is the only direction they can manage to go without a lot of fancy (LOL) paddling. Not only that but now they have to figure out what to do with the rod before they pick up the paddle. It looks easy, because it is easy... once you figure it out. Once you start to get comfortable with a new system of doing things, it is hard to start all over learning another system.
The point I'm trying to make is a begiiner probably shouldn't try to fish one style yak part of the day and then switch to try out another style in an effort to determine what is best for them.The tendancy is to go with what ever you tried first so you don't have to deal with learning a new system before you have the first one mastered.
If I were to jump on a sit on top in a river it would be a disaster. I would forget all about the rods behind me and they would wind up tangling with the first overhanging tree limb I encountered. All stars and falcon rods weren't built for wrestling trees. No reels that I can think of mention anything about being designed for bouncing along a river bottom.:eek: I would probably never get in another if that were to happen.:(
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,810 Posts
Yup, the low-hanging branches often found in rivers are not very good for mostly-vertical rod holders. Jeff almost offered such a sacrifice on Monday. I've been thinking of replacing my flush-mounts with Scotties so I can lay them down when I want to...

Get out and try some stuff. Acknowledge that you're probably going to make some less-than-perfect choices the first time out -- that's how you gain experience, that's how you learn, that's how you decide what works well or poorly for you. Do the best you can to "play the field" for a while; try to keep an open mind while you do, and decide ahead of time not to get discouraged. This is an experimental period, don't expect to win the Bassmaster on your first kayak test-fishing outing. Your goal the first several times out is to learn what this yak-fishing thing is about, not to catch a prize-winning limit.
 
1 - 20 of 26 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top