NC Angler Forums banner
1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well I now have a son and know one day he will want to fish . I know nothing of it I have caught a couple of small mouth bass on a spinner bait and several catfish nothing extremely big. My question is when is it to cold to fish,what good lures to use ,what attract them , and basically everything I need to know alos how to tie a good hook etc , website??? I had no father and never had anyone to teach me these things and want to be able to answer my sons questions when he ask. Your help and response is greatly appreciated.
 

·
Red X Angler
Joined
·
16,054 Posts
Check out my Blog here on Ncangler.
Fishing 101: A Beginners Guide
I am curently working on an easy to follow "beginners series"
Usually in fresh water around here if water temp is over 50 you're fine. Just know that fishing will be slower and you just about have to put it in their face for them to bite. Makes it tough for a beginner. Spring is the most active time. Starting in NC about mid March. For a beginner I'd say this time of year if you have access to a pond you'll have better luck. If fishing a river look for moving current and fish deep for Catfish with blood baits or cutbait. Panfish will respond best to live minnows, worms and crickets. Artificial baits are effective but presentation has to be slow and thngs like jigs or carolina rigged worms that can be pulled along on and just off the bottom.
I'm sure others will chime in as well.. Good Luck and Welcome !!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
175 Posts
First off welcome to NCAngler. There is a wealth of information on this site and you will have more dads willing to give more help than you will know what to do with. Different species of fish seem to be more active at different temperatures. So it comes down to what you can stand. One thing to keep in mind is if the wind is out of the East stay home as this is the worst time to go.
The easiest knot to tie is a trilene knot. Take your line and run about four inches of line through the eye of the hook. Double the line back along the line from the reel and wrap it around 5 to seven time. Then take that same end and double back to the loop that was made at the eye and push it through. Holding the end and the main line pull it down and you should be ready to go. Note this knot can be used for tying on lure, swivels, weights or what ever. I hope this helps
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
330 Posts
Catmando,

First of all, welcome to ncangler. I am sure you will find it to be a great resource to your future angling adventures and a great place to gather info to pass down to your son.
To answer your questions, it is important to note that fishing in lakes will differ from fishing in rivers/streams. It never gets too cold to fish, just uncomfortable to fish. Very few species stop eating in winter. They do get lethargic and less active in cold water temps but most continue to feed, only at a slower pace than during warm water conditions. Most fish will migrate in both lakes and rivers in colder water temps, generally, moving to deeper water. Successful winter fishermen not only change the lures they use but also the retrieval speed. The fish are less active so a slower retrieve is necessary to keep your bait in the strike zone longer. Smallmouth in lakes usually hang around rocky points. A deep diving crank bait or a plastic bodied jig are usually pretty good baits in winter fished deep (bumping the bottom). But it is hard to beat a live crawfish or salamander! Scent is also an important factor in waking up a lethargic fish. Catfish seem to bite just as well in winter as they do in summer. Again, they seem to like deeper water. If you can find deep water in a lake where a stream or river enters the lake, catfish often hang around these areas as these areas are a good source of food being washed into the lake. Catfish often lay in deep holes when they are not actively feeding. When they begin to feed they generally move out of the deeper holes in search of food. My favorite place to fish in a river is just upstream of a deep hole. Any bait with a strong odor seems to work well for catfish. (chicken liver, or cut bait).
You can't beat the flavor of a fish caught out of cold water.
Hope this helps you in your fishing endeavors.

Daniel Boone
Nantahala Fly Fishing Co.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Catmando

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,131 Posts
Catmando - Welcome to NC Angler. And congratulations on becoming a father!

Luremaker is absolutely right about the trilene knot, it's wonderful and easy to tie even at night. Sometimes a picture is worth a thousand words, so here's a link with some pictures on how to tie many of the most polular knots including the trilene.

Fishing Knots

Tight lines!
Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thank you guys very much for the replies, another question is cape fear a good place for big cats ??? I want to go somewhere different and try it out and my wife and I have a free day tommorow (no baby). She wants to go with me so if you could let me know if there are any hot spots etc how deep what bait to use shad ,livers ??? whatever they like whatever you know and again thanks very much i am sure you will answer or i mean hear alot from me and btw if any of you have questions regarding Reef tanks or anything aquatic I know alot not everything but ALOT it was my hobby but i had to give it up for now
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
330 Posts
in-fisherman mag covers the most freshwater species. Bass, Catfish, Carp, Panfish, Pike and Walleye, Trout, Salmon, it's a very good magazine for beginners and old-timers alike. Check out the website In-Fisherman you can even read some old articles. I wish I could tell you where to fish the cape fear but it's been along time. I once kayaked the white water section and seen alot of anglers with long surf rods fishing for big cats in the deeper hole's.

Good luck
Daniel
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,444 Posts
welcome to the site..mando

winter time is not the best time to try and learn how to fish. as the fishing is tough even for vetern anglers..imo use this winter to get your knot tying down. casting techiques tuned to a higher level..

and if your like the rest of us a chapter 11 file readied..as the tackle monkey will make this happen if you let him.;) lol

as for fishing on high rock it is slow right now the crappie bite should be picking up..

zooker
 

·
Red X Angler
Joined
·
16,054 Posts
Cape fear is a great place for Cats from what I hear. I havent fished it myself "yet"
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Hey Catmando,

I am also new to this forum and know nothing about saltwater. I recently moved to the "far east" from more northerly regions. With that out of the way, I have been fishing freshwater streams my entire life. My father taught me on small mountain streams, and I can't say enough good things about that type of fishing. Watch "A River Runs Through It" to get the picture. You usually will have active fish almost year round. Most fishermen aren't aware that smallmouth bass will become very active in water around 55 degrees. That kind of behavior has led some people to call them "green trout." They are a good species to train kids on because the smaller varieties (once again, in small rivers/streams) will hit lures up to and bigger than their body size. I have caught a three inch smallmouth on a four inch tube jig. I learned to fish catching 8" smallmouth on grubs and tubes. White grubs in the one-and-a-half to two inch size will catch fish all day, if your son is old enough to reel constantly. They are good because panfish will also hit them as will trout from time to time. It keeps your options wide open. Get a very flexible rod because kids find this more enjoyable and easy to cast (that usually means fiberglass - which also has the great benefit of not breaking when wacked on rocks and tree branches). Shakespeare sells an outstanding micro-fishing rig that is about 5 foot long, is a spincaster (thumb button), and will cast fairly long distances. It will also make a 10" fish feel like a monster. Mountain river fishing is sometimes better than catfishing for a little guy because the water is usually shallow enough (when you have been careful to find a long, expansive section of river) for the kid to wade out some, play with crustaceans, throw rocks, etc. Smallmouth are also fierce fighters and plentiful. I am assuming, of course, that all of this is available in the mountains of NC. I am new to the state and could be way off base. I also used to fish for catfish and catch them like crazy using two or three nightcrawlers wadded on a 2/0 hook, but sometimes catfishing is very slow - with a big payoff! As some of the others have said, fishing with crayfish is deadly and almost guaranteed for smallmouth - it can also be a lot of fun for kids to move around rocks trying to catch some.
Smallmouth will also keep you busy your entire life. Fishing for the big ones is more like hunting than fishing at times, but the catch is phenomenal. When they are young, however, they are like humans and are dumb and will take anything.
The great thing about fishing is that we are all always newbies. I have been fishing my entire life in the mountains and am now thinking of taking up saltwater (no mountains near me these days) and guess what - I don't know anything again. But your son will definitely appreciate what you are doing. I know that when my dad goes I am going to weep like a little girl when I think of him teaching me to flycast in the yard and the dozens of times we went to a riverbank together. Its a great thing for you and your son.
 

·
Red X Angler
Joined
·
16,054 Posts
yeah !! next time you have Hickory Farms sausage left PM me I'll give ya my addresss! LOL
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top