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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This year I am going to catch an old drum. My one setup is a penn battle 4000 spooled with 150 yards of 30lb PP on a 7 med heavy spinning rod. I have another setup that I am considering using but I want some opinions on if its too light. It a quantum smoke 3000 on a 7' med action rod. It currently has 100 yards of 20lb PP but is not nearly full and I am going to respool. If this setup is useable (this reel has a very strong and smooth drag 18lb I believe) should I pack it with 20lb or 15lb line? The smoke would be used for artificials but the penn may get used as a bait soaking setup some of the time.

By the way I know a big drum needs to be landed within 10 minutes or you could kill the fish. Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Basically I guess I am asking is a smoke 3000 is adequate for catching a big drum on artificials... and 15lb braid a good choice?
 

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I think this setup would work fine
Not for the fish. You need to go bigger, with a heavier set up.
These are the breeders you need to get them in quick & in good shape.

I use Trevela off shore jigging rod with Slammer 560 reel spooled with 50# braid from a boat.
Would you use a 3000 series reel to fight an AJ? I wouldn't. ........ ICM
 

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Well, it can be done with the 3000, earlier this year I brought one in with a 6'6' med with a 2500 loaded with 10# braid, but I exuasted the fish to get him in. Although the fish swam away on its own,I'm with ICM on this one. better to beef up the setup just to make sure the fish swims away healthy!
 

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It can be done friend, but always use a 4000 setup or better when doing this from a yak. A 5000 series paired with 30 pound braid is more appropriate from a kayak. Always fish for oldies from a kayak with a partner. Bagged a few last year, and i would not dare go alone. The biggest trick is not catching them, but its figuring out the anchor line situation. These fish will do multiple runs... to, away, and under your kayak, in all directions, and full 360 degree spins are not uncommon. If he wraps around your anchor line, then you could have a dangerous problem on your hands, or a lost anchor, or a lost fish at best..and sometimes 1 bite is all you get. Losing the anchor means the end of the session! I usually use 1 anchor for every 2 anglers, and connect the 2 kayaks by a rope/carabiner system. That way when someone hooks up, the other angler can quickly disconnect the anchor (or the rope) for the angler that is fighting the fish. If the un-anchored kayak is the one that hooks up, then all the other angler has to do is disconnect the carabiner and it's sleigh ride time. I use a crab pot-style buoy at the top of the anchor line to keep my anchor line afloat and visible. These fish will wrap you up on a small vessell much more easier than from a boat. I say this from experience. One night last september, i had 2 lines out with lupton rigs and one of them started peeling drag. My partner quickly paddled over and disconnected my anchor from my cleat, and pulled it up for me so i could go on a sleigh ride. Before i could even think to pull in the other lupton rig, the fish had wrapped around it multiple times. I had to cut the line, (while fighting a 40 pound fish from a 12' vessel) losing expensive tackle in the process. I just thought to myself, "thank god it wasn't my anchor line." Other than than that, you will normally be fishing for these giants in open water that is inhabited by large bull sharks, giant stingrays, and other nasty creatures. Always have a friend around just in case. I have an friend (who remains unnamed) and he prefers to carry a .38 pistol on our outings, just in case we get harassed by the man in the grey suit. The Neuse is one of the more diverse fisheries in the country, you never know what you might bring boatside. Not the most dangerous thing in the world, but it sure ain't the safest. It's also necessary to have another angler to get that photo op!!! I like your confidence brother... Let's find some this year!
 

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All of our fish are caught, photographed, and released in about 10-15 minutes tops. When he feels like he is revived, revive him some more just to be sure. Do not let go of the fish until he swims away with his own force. Usually that means you get soaking wet from all the tail slaps, but at least you know he is good to go when he does. Catching big drum from the kayak is one of the wettest, slimiest experiences you will ever have. Wear a bathing suit. lol. Also, if you go at night: use a bright marine light that is easily seen by other boaters and elevate it as much as you can. People zip around the river at night just like they do in the daytime, so be concious that you are in a small plastic vessel in a very popular playground.
 

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Would you use a 3000 series reel to fight an AJ? I wouldn't. ........ ICM


The reason i say that is because i have personally caught them on a 3000 battle and released them unharmed. Yes, it is not ideal but it will work. I never mentioned using the 3000 for AJ's i just said that it would work if it was his only option for a second rod.
 

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This year I am going to catch an old drum. My one setup is a penn battle 4000 spooled with 150 yards of 30lb PP on a 7 med heavy spinning rod. This setup would work for a heavy popping cork rig.

I have another setup that I am considering using but I want some opinions on if its too light. It a quantum smoke 3000 on a 7' med action rod. It currently has 100 yards of 20lb PP but is not nearly full and I am going to respool. If this setup is useable (this reel has a very strong and smooth drag 18lb I believe) should I pack it with 20lb or 15lb line? The smoke would be used for artificials but the penn may get used as a bait soaking setup some of the time.

IMHO this is to light of a setup to chase bull reds. Yes they are caught all the time on light tackle but usually while they are chasing puppy drum, flounder or trout, not chasing bull reds. 30 pound should be minimum on light gear and we try to have at least 200 yards of that in the event of a big girl taking off for parts unknown.

When we are soaking baits we use heavy conventional tackle with 25 or 30 pound mono and a med heavy or heavy jigging rod. They can take the torque that these fish give and bring them in pretty quick to the boat.

By the way I know a big drum needs to be landed within 10 minutes or you could kill the fish. Thanks!
Always great fun out on the river.
 

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Oh yea. I love the old drum in the surf. They hit and check out burning drag. They'll usually run a 100 yards and cut left or right where I fish. I love to feel the power of that tail transmitted down 12 or 13 feet of graphite.
 

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The reason i say that is because i have personally caught them on a 3000 battle and released them unharmed. Yes, it is not ideal but it will work. I never mentioned using the 3000 for AJ's i just said that it would work if it was his only option for a second rod.
It was a rhetorical question. Did not require an answer.
As to using a 3000 series reel. Sure it can be done, but not a good choice for either the fish or your reel.
Go bigger, shorten the fight, save the fish. That was my point. ....... ICM
 
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