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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Time to get this discussion/argument fired up. For a long time I have been pro paddle and I still think I am to a sense.

First let me talk about the advantages of paddling. Much lighter, simpler, less expensive kayak with less stuff to tear up and worry about. Much better in a marsh or other extremely shallow water or anywhere where you are paddling over submerged junk. More cockpit and deck space and i'm not sure how you would manage busting through the surf without a rod pod to keep those high dollar rod and reels from getting drenched with sand and salt if you turtle which will most certainly happen. Paddle kayaks are more maneuverable and I feel a better option for being tight to structure sheepshead fishing or even trying to stay directly over a brush pile crappie fishing.

Now the advantages of peddle fishing. The big one is Speed. The Hobie Revo and Outback are very fast kayaks and are right at home covering huge distances even when against current and wind. Hands free fishing. If you fish inshore saltwater you are dealing with wind of some sort almost every time you go out. It would be very nice to keep fishing while maintaining a slow peddling cadence against the wind without having to anchor or reposition between every cast. These kayaks also allow you to troll while holding the rods and at higher speeds as the hobie mirage drive puts out some serious torque for dragging big baits for pelagics or multiple rods inshore that would start to bog down a paddler. People say with a peddle kayak you are utilizing your legs which have stronger muscle than your arms and back. While this may be true I feel its a 2 way street. I think you are able to go at 100% for longer with a paddle kayak due to the fact that your muscles in your legs are so big they exhaust your entire body faster. Think of it this way. For those that have ever lifted weights, Squats are much more exhausting than bicep curls or lateral pull downs.

Now for you kayakers out there which do you prefer?? I especially want to hear from those that have went from paddle to peddle and what do you feel are the biggest advantages either way? Like I said I have been mostly pro paddle kayak but lately I have been feeling attracted to the 2015 Hobie Outback. For high current or windy conditions it would have to be sweet but I have some hang ups with peddle yaks to overcome yet lol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I agree. But if you are buying just one and are committed to yak fishing buy a paddle yak. You can fish everywhere. You are going to want to kill yourself fishing a marsh with a native propel or Hobie pro angler. Lol just more of my thoughts..
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I could buy 35 of my kayaks for the price of that thing not to mention gas, oil, registration, trailer maintenance and the joy of babying it everywhere you fish because it might get a scratch. But yeah I guess that would solve all the problems lol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Hobie outback you wouldn't need a trailer. A pro angler you may. They are barges! The outback rigged weighs 93 pounds so it's not light but the drive comes right out making them simpler to carry.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Yeah pretty much everyone I've ever seen has a paddle. For those that aren't familiar with the hobie mirage drive when you have one peddle all the way to the front and the other to the back the fins are tight to the bottom of the boat making launches and landings easier or if you need to grab your paddle and paddle over some shallow stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
There is a big appamatox river company demo day coming up in VA June 13 that I'm planning to go checkout, paddle and peddle some new boats and get a little weekend outing in. I know what your saying evblue about fishing places only a paddle would work. Sometimes I'm cruising along at 3mph and I all the sudden I hit something under water and wonder what would have I just done to a mirage drive..
 

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I have both and use them for different purposes. Bought a pedal/peddle yak 'cause my wrists and shoulders won't allow me to paddle long distances. Now that I have a pedal-driven yak, I use it to cover distance, and it's become an imp part of my bass fishing. Typically the first thing I do when I hook up to a big fish is start pedaling backwards to pull 'em out of structure. And pedaling has become so natural that I pedal and cast/reel all the time. First time I took my Native Mariner Propel to the marsh I realized very quickly this is not a good shallow water boat. Heavy boat with fixed rudder, you do NOT wanna be draggin' this through the mud at low tide. So use my Ride 135 (previously Tarpon 120) for that. Different boats for different scenarios, that solve different problems for me. FWIW // Joel
 

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I've never owed a peddle yak, but have been interested in them for a long while. I like the Native peddles because you can peddle backwards. I am still impressed with the Hobie peddle system. Pesky has one of those and his is super fast, with what looks like little effort.
 

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I have had all 3 kinds, (Tarpon 10, Hobie pro angler and the latest was the ocean kayak torque.) I am with C lane. They all have their place. Hands down favorite is the Torque for fishing. No work once you are on the water, just fish. Will never paddle again.
 
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